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Thread: Complete

  1. #1

    Complete

    Can somebody please tell me does complete mean you will never get any more feeling or movement back at all.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by KERRDOUGLAS
    Can somebody please tell me does complete mean you will never get any more feeling or movement back at all.
    According to the American Spinal Injury Association Classification System which has been adopted by ISCOS (International Spinal Cord Society) as well, "complete" is defined as ASIA A. This is when a person has some spinal cord level below which he/she has no sensory or voluntary movement. Since the S4/5 sacral segment is the lowest level of the spinal cord and this controls anal sensation and sphincter contraction, the definition of ASIA A is absence of anal sensation and voluntary sphincter contraction. While people with ASIA classification tend to recover less than patients with ASIA B (sensory preservation below the injury site and anal sensation/sphincter control), ASIA C (non-useful motor movements below the injury site plus anal sensation/sphincter control, less than 50% of the motor score below the injury site), ASIA D (recovery of motor movements exceeding 50% of the motor score below the injury site plus anal sensation/sphincter control), some people who are initially ASIA A can become ASIA B, C, or even D over time. In the Model Systems Database, about 5% of people with ASIA A classification become B, C, or D. However, in my own experience, as many as 17% of people who are ASIA A during the first 24 hours after injury and who received methylprednisolone will become ASIA B or C.

    Let me give an example because many people often do not understand the classification system. Christopher Reeve was ASIA A for over a year after his injury. He had no sensation or voluntary movement below C3 during the first year after injury. He had received methylprednisolone within 30 minutes after his injury. Over time, however, he began to recover function. If my memory serves me correctly, by the second year, he developed anal sensation, and therefore became ASIA B. He progressively got more sensation back so that he was feeling 3/4 of his body by 4 years. He also recovered some movement of his left index fingure and also some movement in his hip and knee muscles. He became an ASIA C.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 07-20-2005 at 10:44 AM.

  3. #3

    Thumbs up

    Thanks for the info Wise Young.

  4. #4

    Common?

    Is receiving methylprednisolone common procedure. How would you know if you received this?

  5. #5
    Senior Member BeeBee's Avatar
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    I understood that steroid application was pretty much standard procedure, but my son's medical records contain a line that says: "Steriods were not administered because the injury was thought to be too severe". I don't understand why they would decide that and not give him the medications. This was only a year ago.
    BeeBee

  6. #6
    In the USA, the use of steroids immediately after injury are considered standard practice except in a few circumstances. This includes the injury being more than 8 hours old prior to treatment (for example, someone laid out beside the road longer than this before being discovered), penetrating injuries (ie, gun shot wounds or knife wounds), and open head injury. In other countries this has not necessarily become the standard. This includes Canada.

    You or your physician can see if this was done in either the ER or ICU records, or in the discharge summary for the initial hospitalization.

    (KLD)

  7. #7
    Senior Member feisty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young

    Let me give an example because many people often do not understand the classification system. Christopher Reeve was ASIA A for over a year after his injury. He had no sensation or voluntary movement below C3 during the first year after injury. He had received methylprednisolone within 30 minutes after his injury. Over time, however, he began to recover function. If my memory serves me correctly, by the second year, he developed anal sensation, and therefore became ASIA B. He progressively got more sensation back so that he was feeling 3/4 of his body by 4 years. He also recovered some movement of his left index fingure and also some movement in his hip and knee muscles. He became an ASIA C.

    Wise.
    this was/is a really good example.

    thanks!
    An administrator made me remove my signature.

  8. #8
    Senior Member BeeBee's Avatar
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    He was transported immediately, so time isn't an issue. I got the quote from the ER record transcript. His surgeon seemed to think they were administered, but the ER records indicate otherwise.
    BeeBee

  9. #9
    Senior Member keps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donz
    Is receiving methylprednisolone common procedure. How would you know if you received this?
    I presume immediate steroid treatment is standard in the UK, as I received steroids as soon as it was realized I had a spinal injury.

  10. #10
    Senior Member jb's Avatar
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    kerr

    i'm 4yrs post and considered complete and i have significant motor and sensory return below my injury. i thought telling you might make you feel better. i know it's encouraging for me. never give up!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

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