Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: colonoscopy

  1. #1

    colonoscopy

    Since this topic has come up several times, maybe this will be of interest to some. I saw the internist yesterday to schedule a "routine" colonoscopy, as if any colonoscopy can be classifies as routine. He is the same guy I saw 8 years ago. He told me the prep has changed and a "drinking contest" is no longer necessary. I need to maintain a liquid diet for the 24 hrs. prior to the procedure. At 3PM drink 1 1/2 oz. phospha soda. At 4PM take 4 ducolax tablets. He waived the Fleets enema the next AM. The results will be the same, major toilet time, but the discomfort of drinking a gallon of liquid will be gone. BTW, I can have water ice or popsicle as part of my liquid diet, but nothing red.

  2. #2
    Free, good luck with drinking the Fleets prep solution. It is really nasty. You can try mixing it in carbonated apple juice or ginger ale, but that may sour you on those drinks forever. Get some extra when you pick up your supplies, as it is not unusual to vomit due to the taste, which means having to get down another dose. (Sorry for being so graphic!)

    Be sure to protect your skin from loose or incontinent stools during the prep, and you may want to consider using an adult diaper for the prep period. I hope you have some assistance for this.

    Be sure that there is a plan for monitoring you for AD during the procedure and taking immediate action if it should occur. You will be sedated and unable to direct your care during this time.

    (KLD)

  3. #3

    Spinal nurse--colonoscopy prep

    I didn't need adult diapers when I had the colonscopy 8 yrs. ago and I had to drink the gallon of poison. Is this prep that much more harsh. I do have decent sensation and bowel function and hope to be OK as long as I stay close to the bathroom. I called the internist yesterday and asked if I could take Immodium after the prep was completed, as I am concerned about mucous, but his nurse said it wouldn't be necessary, as I will be "cleaned out". Would Immodium the night before the procedure be such a bad thing? Where's Katy Couric when your need her?

  4. #4

    colonoscopy prep

    Free - I would suggest that you not take imodium during the prep time for this procedure. On the day following the procedure you may want to eat a diet of soft foods and avoid spicy or flatulence producing foods.

    This prep, from personal experience, did not elicit a harsh GI response but was most effective is clearing the colon of any fecal content. I did not find the Fleets phosphosoda unpleasant as KLD has stated. I found taking it, mixed in well chilled sprite, much more palatable than apple juice. The latter was much too sweet for my task; I had no problems with nausea.

    Did you have any problems with AD when you had the procedure 8 years ago? I would encourage you to be sure that everyone is aware of your risk for AD. Do you have written information that you can take with you? If not, there is information re: AD on the Paralyzed Veterans of America site: (for both the clinician and the consumer) at http://www.pva.org/NEWPVASITE/public...onsortpubs.htm CRF

  5. #5

    Thank you II, CRF

    KLD,scared me a little bit, especially since I never have involuntaries. At my level, t11-l1, incomplete, AD has never been a problem. I'm not looking forward to having this done, but I think it is the wise thing to do, now that I'm past 50. I'll keep you all posted, although I don't expect to remember anything, since they'll have an IV with valium and demorol. The last time I went to sleep, and I awoke to find that it was over.

  6. #6

    colonoscopy prep

    Free - thanks for the update re: your injury level. AD is a risk factor for persons at about the T6/8 level and above. So this is not something that you need be concerned about. I think your idea to have this done is good; this then becomes a baseline for future care and attention. CRF

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    11,007
    Sure beats drinking 4 bottles of citrate of magnesium like I had to a few months back (and the doc wanted me to down a 5th!). Free, if there is any mucous when you get there the doc and his crew will deal with it. I know I talked some during the test but I don't remember much after I asked what my blood pressure was when they started. I'm a C5-7 incomplete and they knew about AD. I also talked my insurance company into an overnight stay for the prep because of being a quad and the AD. Hey, it's cheaper than dealing with a quad after she's had a stroke. Not to mention that being above and beyond the call of duty for a family member caregiver.

  8. #8

    colonoscopy update

    I had the procedure today and it was uneventful. One polyp snipped. Come back in three years. The procedure itself is painless as they put you out, and wake you up when its over. The prep is the difficult part, especially for us. I used phospha soda (1 1/2 oz. and 4 Ducolax tablets). Fleet enema in the AM was also on the schedule, but they waived it for me. (Thank you) I was told to begin the phospa soda at 3PM; the Ducolax an hour later `. I started at 2:30. I would suggest starting even earlier, since it didn't fully leave my system until 12:30 AM. I was worried all night. I asked if I could take Immodium, but they said "nO". Apparently the medications pull the fluids from your system which cleanse your colon. Adult diapers or sitting on pads is necessary, because the stuff just drains out of you with no warning. Even if you don't get AD, I would recommend having the prep done in the hospital. There are so many transfers and clean-ups, it becomes a gymnastic ordeal. On the plus side there was no real discomfort or cramping. The best part is peace of mind. One less worry.

  9. #9

    colonoscopy

    Free - So glad you got through this ok and the report was good. Thanks for sharing your experience, as I think many others who have had similar questions will benefit from your suggestions and experience. As I read your post, however, I thought that you must be exhausted. Surprised that you are back to the computer.

    I would agree with the advice about being an inpatient for the prep. When you indicated your injury level, I thought that home prep would be manageable but your experience confirms my thoughts that all SCI should prep as an inpatient. For others who may read this, I would strongly advise that you ask your doctor to write an order/referral for an overnight inpatient admission for the colonoscopy prep. For those with insurance pre-certification requirements, this will probably take some perseverance and time. As soon as you know this is a procedure that you need to undergo, you should contact your insurance claims advisor/case manager, etc. to request this approval. CRF

  10. #10
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    11,007
    CRF, I had KLD help me through a lot of tests I had the past 6 months that included a colonoscopy. It was great knowing what to expect and what to know about in advance. While I'm incomplete enough where I have rarely had AD problems I found that mentioning that, skin problems from the prepping procedure (pressure sores if you try to do this on a commode), blood pressure problems from the major dehydration some go through, all helped the nurse manager at my private insurance approve me for an overnight very quickly. And my GI doc did write a script for an IV with potassium and I still scored an all time low of 47/42 when I got to the OR prep area. The nurses there asked about my normal pressure, 90/60, and why I was reading so low. I told them about the 4 bottles of citrate and that I probably would go back up if they opened the IV more. They did and I did.

    I suggest being very pleasant to whomever answers the phone for pre-certifications at your insurer and ask to speak to a nurse manager because of a long standing chronic condition. And women should ask their doctor before the procedure for a couple tablets of Cipro for afterwards or something similar because prep is not pretty nor nice to our bodies. Guys, it's up to you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •