New Statement on Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Issued

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EXERCISE, HYPONATREMIA, SPORTS, LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS Contact Information

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Athletes who drink excessive amounts of fluids during prolonged exercise—particularly novice marathon runners—can develop dangerously low sodium levels, called exercise-associated hyponatremia.




Newswise — Athletes who drink excessive amounts of fluids during prolonged exercise—particularly novice marathon runners—can develop dangerously low sodium levels, called exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH). Awareness of EAH is increasing, but athletes, coaches, and medical professionals need reliable information on the causes, recognition, prevention, and treatment of this potentially fatal condition.

To address this need, the July/August Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine presents a position statement on current understanding of EAH in endurance athletes. The statement summarizes the conclusions of a panel of medical and scientific experts who met at the 1st International Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Consensus Development Conference, held in Cape Town, South Africa, in March, 2005.

Exercise-associated hyponatremia happens when the body’s sodium level drops too low during prolonged exercise. When mild, EAH may have no symptoms. If sodium levels continue to drop, symptoms such as bloating, “puffiness,” nausea and vomiting, and headache develop. At later stages, confusion/disorientation, seizures, and breathing problems may occur, caused by swelling of the brain.



http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/513244/