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Thread: Elliptical trainer

  1. #11
    dogger,

    I thought I addressed this but obviously I wasn't clear in my previous thread.

    No. As a quad without enough hand grip or strength using the levers is more difficult and less beneficial imo.

    The purpose of this (elliptical session) is to gait or simulate walking. Hence the need for the motor. Trying to simulate the same by using upper body strength defeats the purpose (this is not an upper body workout) and is more difficult while swinging in the harness and keeping ones legs at the right height/angle, etc. so that they don't hyperextend, etc. while pushing / pulling on the levers.

    As a walking quad you may have a different experience / opinion. But as a complete injury this has been my experience.

    your welcome,

    Chris

  2. #12
    Senior Member Janet McDonald's Avatar
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    Yes, Dogger

    Many patients who are not able to use automated arm swing due to knee or trunk instability, anxiety, or many other reasons are told to use the handlebars mainly for balance, which still allows a loose movement of the shoulder, elbow, and ankles. If the patient has the impression of progress, the patient may start holding the automated arm swing by moving the patients hand in the right direction and rhythm arm swinging is imitated and initiated. A Quadripedal reflex is where the arm swing comes in and the forelimb movements are coordinated with the legs.

    Janet

  3. #13
    Piela,

    paras yes, quads no.

    This is a home based system not in a clinic with lots of assistance. The idea is for this individual to be able to do this by himself eventually. Of course arm swing is better but initially and for safety reasons I think stationary bars are better. So, when purchasing one which one should be bought initially? Stationary.

    I wrote my response (which I'm now regretting) to The Mom for her purposes in setting something up for her son (quad) presumably at home - not in a clinic.

    The Mom, apologies. I should have written you in private topics vs. public forum.


    ...next time

  4. #14
    Senior Member Janet McDonald's Avatar
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    Chris D,

    You might want to try a parallelogram to avoid swinging in your harness. It's very useful for quads.

    Janet

  5. #15
    Senior Member Janet McDonald's Avatar
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    You can have stationary bars with optional arm swing. Why wouldn't you want to have this option when you start to have the impression of progress?

    Janet

  6. #16
    Senior Member dogger's Avatar
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    sorry if i confused this issue, to be honest , i had never heard of an elliptical trainer before i found CC and never knew that motorised versions were available until reading this thread . my question was aimed at trying to obtain more information . to reverse ''learned non use '' and stimulate ''central pattern generators '' is mechanized input enough , or does there come a stage when input from the person's muscles are required ? i was also thinking of my own experience , i walk without swinging my arms [ along with other gait faults ] , and feel this [arm motion] is an important part of gait .

    thank you ,
    dogger

    every day i wake up is a good one .

  7. #17
    Senior Member Janet McDonald's Avatar
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    Yes, Dogger

    Many of the locomotion people are indeed entraining quadripedal locomotion rather than bipedal locomotion. You might try doing a search on reciprocal reflexes and quadripedal reflexes. I believe that L2 stimulation will be very important for your locomotor training.

    Have fun,

    Janet

  8. #18
    Senior Member Janet McDonald's Avatar
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    Dogger,

    I believe the mechanized arm swing would be enough...you will still be using your arm swing muscles. The mechanized arm swing will guide you threw the proper arm swing for you locomotor training. I hope that answers your questions.

    Good night,

    Janet

  9. #19
    Piela, Janet,

    Who made you the resident expert?

    Do you even have a home based setup as I described?

    Have you personally ever tried or engaged in a harnessed elliptical training session?

    I don't buy it Janet. I think you're shooting from the hip and not giving realistic, practical advice.


    Dogger,

    yes, this idea is designed to reduce learned non-use and induce central pattern gait training. Motorized or not the idea is to practice walking for those who cannot normally.

    Additionally, the motor can increase / decrease speed which I believe is very interesting. The faster I go the more "natural" the motion and it feels like my body is re-learning at a faster rate (hard to describe).

    Obviously, if muscle innervation is present then hopefully one could "walk" without the motor turned on. Make sense?

    As far as arm swing I really don't think it matters in / on this apparatus - at least not initially or in my case.

    Hopefully this clarifies. Good luck.

  10. #20
    ChrisD,

    When you're on the elliptical trainer, do you try reverse motion? (peddling backwards?)

    Do you think it would be a benefit to reverse motion from time to time?

    The reason I'm asking is it seems the muscles are quick to tire when peddling backwards.(working different muscles?)

    I wasn't very popular when I made the kids do backwards skating drills during hockey practices. (Legs get the "burn" very quickly.)

    Thanks. lway

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