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Thread: Has anyone here visited project walk?

  1. #21
    Senior Member vgrafen's Avatar
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    Chris, sounds like you're an ideal condidate for PW: motivated and prepared, body and mind. However, if you've got some toe movement, you IS motor incomplete, man, and that's good, and I'm envious, and you stand a damn good chance of employing spinal plasticity to regain some function. Go get 'em, boy, and please report what happens, good and bad.

    You also raise a good point about rehab clinics and how long they'll be willing to hang in there with completes. I am the only complete in Nor Cal doing any treadmill walking, that I have encountered, I should add, and from what Davis, Enloe and Santa Clara tell me. Why? 'Cause nobody believes it'll do any good; clearly the word isn't out, so nobody asks for it and nobody prescribes it. I am anticipating the day when my PT says, 'v, we're not getting anywhere here, medi-care won't continue paying, and I'm not sure we're getting positive results, it's time to cut you off.' I hope toi god I have something tangible by then to show, but I may not, so I'll have to have something going at home, maybe FES. Still, it's a crapshoot and yeah, maybe it ain't fair, but it's the only game in town, and I'm in.

    vgrafen

  2. #22
    Vgraf, Thanks.

    And I think from your post below and from your thread about your recovery you have pinpointed the problem. Belief, or the lack of it from most of the sci community. And attitude towards recovery.

    Hope and hard work.

    I wonder why more (this community not withstanding) are not inspired to pursue these paths?

    Onward and Upward!

  3. #23
    Chris, why do you consider yourself motor complete? If you can move a toe, then there has to be some existing connections left and what you describe sounds very incomplete to me. I would be willing to bet that with the kind of function you describe, you will be at least standing on your own in a few months after intense therapy.

  4. #24
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    I see little reason to doubt that treadmill training would benefit some people, I went on a 3 month course 8 years that employed the Dikoul methods and learnt quite a lot. I knew before I went that I had muscles below the level of the break (c5/6) as I could feel pulsing when I tried to move them,the therapists there seemed to know where these muscles were and worked on them accordingly. This differed from the therapy I received after my injury in rehab because there they only worked on muscles they knew I had eg:shoulders biceps. The biggest improvement I got from the course was to my stomach muscles which went from a 28kg assisted sit up down to 4kg when I left.One of the other things that happened was that I could make my legs raise when I induced spasm and I also had a degree of control in that I could lift either my left or right leg on command (or both) but no control over how high they would lift, this is why I find projectwalks work interesting.
    The downside for me was that as the muscles strenghened so did the spasm and when I got home it was hard to find people to help with these exercises and gradually my workrate tailed off though I often wonder where I would be today had I been able to continue. If you have the time and the means these kind of exercises can pay dividends though I speak as somebody with an incomplete injury.

  5. #25
    Carl, thanks.

    You and Vgraf may be right in terms of incomplete but personally unless I'm able to voluntarily lift a leg, bend an ankle or bring my knees together the innervation to the muscles that require walking are, at this time, complete. Hopefully with therapy this will change.

    I wish there was such a place/therapy like PW for my hands though. Is anything more frustrating than quad hands?

    Onward and Upward!

  6. #26
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    Coordination dynamic therapy?

    Has anybody tried this???

    http://www.spinabifida-online.com/etreatment01.htm

    Eric Texley

  7. #27

    interesting

    I find all this fascinating, but I have a question. For a lower level quad, say c-5 to c7, don't you use your hands as much as possible already? I mean in everyday life, don't you use what you can of your hands, thumb, and fingers? I'm asking because while I can understand the concept of 'learned non-use' regarding legs, I wonder how this claim could be made to the upper extremities? I mean, you'll do everything your hands and fingers can provide so how can they have 'learned' to not be used?


    If you have the time and money I agree that the worst that will happen is that you may be healthier from the exercise. I think most people bristle at this concept because of the implication that if they'd have worked harder, they wouldn't still be in a wheelchair. We all know what bullsh*t that is. If sheer will and determination could make someone walk after SCI, Chris Reeve and Mike Utley would be dancing circles around their doctors by now. But it's surprising how much of the AB world believes it.

  8. #28
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    I think the same rules apply to your hands as the rest of your body, you tend to work around the deficiencies, I know I do and you do it unconciously. As I`m typing just now I`m not trying to use my fingers properly, I`m working around it. I remember when I left hospital they told me I could have a tendon transfer and I`m so glad that I never went ahead with it because I can manage most things with my hands the way they are using wrist flexion.

  9. #29
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    Tara,

    I'm sorry I missed your request. Sometimes I'm a little sporatic in my visits to Care/Cure. I just visited the New Mobility link to their Project Walk discussion, and it appears that Project Walk cost $2,000 a month and they like to train you if possible for a year. Or at least that's the impression I got from their self-description. I can give you Ted's email address if you like. Also, if you ever post me a question or a comment that I don't respond to, please email me at olddrooler@hcnews.com and I'll get right back to you.

    James Kelly

  10. #30

    . . . Based on my economics training at Mississippi State

    Celtic, from my understanding you can actually retrain the locomotive center in the spinal cord to be able to walk and that it does not necessarily require signals from the brain. Hand function, I believe will require signals from the brain and some sort of regeneration across the injury site to communicate with the hand and fingers for it to work.

    I believe this is correct. . . Maybe someone else or Dr. Young can confirm.

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