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Thread: Combined use of body weight support, functional electric stimulation, and treadmill training to improve walking ability in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury

  1. #1

    Combined use of body weight support, functional electric stimulation, and treadmill training to improve walking ability in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury

    • Field-Fote EC (2001). Combined use of body weight support, functional electric stimulation, and treadmill training to improve walking ability in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 82 (6): 818-24. Summary: OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of an intervention combining body weight support (BWS), functional electric stimulation (FES), and treadmill training on overground walking speed (OGWS), treadmill walking speed, speed and distance, and lower extremity motor scores (LEMS). DESIGN: Before and after comparison. SETTING: Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen subjects with American Spinal Injury Association class C injury who were at least 1 year postinjury and had asymmetrical lower extremity function. INTERVENTION: Subjects trained 1.5 hours per day, 3 days per week, for 3 months. The training consisted of body weight-supported treadmill walking assisted by electric stimulation. Stimulation was applied to common peroneal nerve of the weaker lower extremity (LE) and timed to assist with the swing phase of the step cycle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: OGWS in the absence of both BWS and FES; LEMS, and treadmill training parameters of speed and distance. RESULTS: Over the course of training, there was a significant increase in OGWS (from.12 +/- 0.8m/s to .21 +/- .15m/s, p = .0008), treadmill walking speed (from .23 +/- .12m/s to.49 +/- .20m/s, p = .00003), and treadmill walking distance (from 93 +/- 84m to 243 +/- 139m, p = .000001). The median LEMS increased significantly for both the stimulated and nonstimulated leg (from 8 to 11 in the FES-assisted leg, from 15 to 18 in the nonassisted leg, p < .005 for each). CONCLUSIONS: All subjects showed improvement in OGWS and overall LE strength. Further research is required to delineate the essential elements of these particular training strategies. Division of Physical Therapy and the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. edee@miami.edu

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    This is a very insightfull thread! ALSO in the past several years since this thread some outstanding reseach was completed on the topic that is worthy of mentioning here:

    "Locomotor training progression and outcomes after Incomplete Spinal Cord injury"

    it's an excellent publication that relates to clinical feasibility assessment. I wanted to include this attachment but it was too large in PDF.

    Wise, if you have seen this publication, then I believe you may know that it highly supports the direction things need to go so people can get back on their feet again. If you have a way for me to attach this PDF of this increadable work without exceeding the space limit, I will be glad to share it!! Or maybe you have a copy already that you can share with the forum!!

    This is inspiring information to show how the progressions work!
    Last edited by Walker5473; 11-30-2006 at 12:17 PM.
    Helping people walk again

  3. #3
    http://www.ptjournal.org/cgi/reprint/85/12/1356

    I think you can download the report here

  4. #4
    Thank you! Being able to read this through the forum is great!!!!
    Helping people walk again

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