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Thread: I Had The Drez / It Works

  1. #1
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    I Had The Drez / It Works

    Just want to let you guys that the DREZ does work. I suffered that pain for 20 years and when I couldnt take it no more and to chicken to commit suicide. By the Grace of God I met Dr Blaine Nashold from Duke University who pioneer DREZ surgery. He performed it on Larry Flynt of Hustler magazine and he assisted DR Bullard here in Raleigh at Rex Hospital in mine. I got 100% relief as soon as I woke up in the recovery room. It was unbelievable at first, because I never thought there would be a cure for it. I dont suggest that you go to the first DR to have it done, but find one who has experience and good results to do the surgery. Now after they severe those nerves you will can almost gtd you will never walk again, but for most after 5 years, your not going to walk again anyway. I just want you to know that something can be done. I used to scream outloud too and feel like I was going to explode. Thank God it is over with. Sir Dzoker.

  2. #2
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    Where was your pain, and what nerves did they destroy?

  3. #3
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    What is the DREZ Procedure?

    The DREZ procedure is an operation for patients who have pain that never seems to go away. This type of pain is often called chronic, intractable pain.
    DREZ stands for dorsal root entry zone, which is the area of the spine where the surgery is performed. The dorsal root entry zone is the pain pathway to the brain. People feel pain when the pain signal passes from the part of the body that hurts to the brain along this pathway.
    If this pain pathway is blocked, then the pain signal cannot reach the brain and no pain is felt. In the DREZ procedure, this pathway is blocked deliberately to stop the pain signal from passing to the brain.
    For example, if you cut your finger, the pain signal moves up a nerve in your arm and across to your spinal column. It then travels into your spinal cord through the dorsal root entry zone and finally into your brain. Only then do you feel the pain in your finger.

    How Does the DREZ Procedure Block the Pain Pathway?

    In order to reach the dorsal root entry zone, the doctor removes a small piece of bone from the spinal column. This procedure is called a laminectomy. Once the dorsal root entry zone is visible, a small probe is placed in the area and the tip of the probe is heated. The heating process destroys a small part of the nerve root, which stops or slows the pain signal being sent to the brain. Pain is not felt if the pain signal cannot reach the brain.

    Can the DREZ Procedure Relieve All Types of Pain?

    The DREZ procedure cannot relieve all types of pain. It seems to work best in the case of pain caused by damage to the spinal cord or to large nerves that lead to the spinal cord.
    The Types of pain most likely to be helped by the DREZ procedure are:
    * Facial pain (Tic Douloureux).
    * Phantom limb pain (pain that occurs after an amputation).
    * Occipital neuralgia (a type of headache).
    * Trauma to the spinal cord or to large nerves that lead to the spinal cord.
    * Some types of pain caused by cancer.
    * Some types of pain caused by neurologic conditions, such as multiple sclerosis.
    Each of these conditions has a different success rate with the DREZ procedure. Your doctor can explain how much pain relief you are likely to experience following the DREZ procedure.

    Where Will My Incision Be?

    The DREZ procedure takes place on the spinal cord, which begins at the top of your neck and runs all the way down your back. The area of the spinal cord where the procedure is performed depends on the location of your pain.
    For facial pain and some types of headaches, the surgery is performed on the back of the neck, which sometimes requires the opening of the bone at the back of the head. This type of DREZ is called the caudalis DREZ.
    For arm, hand, chest and back pain, the surgery takes place further down the spine and is called a cervical, thoracic or lumbar DREZ. The cervical DREZ procedure is performed at the shoulder and neck level. The thoracic DREZ procedure is performed at the middle back level. The lumbar DREZ procedure is performed in the lower back, around the hip area.
    For leg and/or foot pain, the procedure is performed low on the back and is known as a conus DREZ.

    Will There Be Any Side Effects from the DREZ Procedure?

    With all surgeries, there are unpleasant changes known as side effects, as well as the possibility of complications. Below are side effects that you may experience following the DREZ procedure.
    Loss of feeling and temperature sensitivity
    The dorsal root entry zone, the pain pathway to the brain, also carries signals that tell the brain about sensation (feeling) and temperature. Once the dorsal root entry zone has been blocked and pain signals no longer can reach the brain, then sensation and temperature signals are blocked as well. For example, if you suffered facial pain that was treated successfully with the DREZ procedure, you no longer would feel pain in that area, but you will not have sensation or temperature sensitivity either.
    Weakness
    You may have weakness on the side of your body on which the DREZ procedure was performed. This weakness may also make it difficult for you to tell where your arm or leg is in relation to your body. Knowing where your arm or leg is in relation to your body is known as proprioception.
    People with normal proprioception can tell, with their eyes closed, whether their arms and legs are resting in their laps, on a table or extended in front of them. Those who have experienced a loss of proprioception cannot tell without looking where their arms and legs are. This loss of proprioception can make simple tasks such as walking, eating, driving, brushing teeth or combing hair more difficult.
    Even if you experience no loss of proprioception, you may have weakness in your arm or leg, which also can make everyday activities more challenging. These problems generally disappear within six months after surgery, but it is possible that they could be permanent conditions.
    Pain
    Like any surgery, the DREZ procedure causes pain from the incision, the cut made through the skin and tissue. You also may experience some local swelling and muscle spasms. After your surgery, you will receive pain medication to relieve this pain and any accompanying swelling or spasms. We will do everyting possible to keep you comfortable during your post-surgical recovery period.
    Other Side Effects
    In rare cases, more serious side effects and complications can occur. The doctors and nurses caring for you are well-trained to handle these situations. Agreat deal of time is spent monitoring your medical history, blood work and x-rays to prevent any serious problems.

    This Information is Provided via A Guide For Patients And Their Families in Regards To the DREZ Surgery at REX HEALTHCARE 4420 Lake Boone Trail Raleigh, NC 27607 tel (919) 783-3163 Dr. Dennis Bullard Raleigh Neurosurgery More Information Re DREZ Surgery for your Burning pain.

  4. #4
    Very informative, thanks for sharing your experience with us.

  5. #5
    Sir, thanks very much also. Wise.

  6. #6
    Thanks for writing about your experience SirDzoker, and thanks for the chat too!

    Mary

  7. #7
    Banned Acid's Avatar
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    So in other words a "phantom" pain can be stopped by destruction of internal systems.
    Yet the illogic of how so, if it were just "phantom", the destruction of internal systems to do with alike forwarding signals, seems not noticed.


    To take up the example of "cutting my finger": So if I cut my finger, instead of appreciating the systems damages info as something useful if wishing to try to steer along in the healing process,
    and also as an information source for what better to avoid doing at the time,
    I run to the doctor, to cut me a hole into the spine and cripple other systems, till I do not even feel the pain anymore.


    Next I might just stick my hand into boiling water, hit instead of a nail my thumb accidentally, have splinters in, and have broken bones,
    and not notice a thingie.

    As systems have been too crippled to even just notice that still.


    Great.


    But I might prefer to not mutilate and destroy systems
    I assume to be of high relevance for reprogrammer attempts.

  8. #8
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    Parker, CO, USA
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    I assume from your post that you were paralyzed prior to DREZ? At what level was your damage?

    I have a SCI at C5, but have no paralysis. However, I do suffer from severe central pain. Because I am extremely drug-sensitive, I cannot take most narcotics, so it has been very difficult to control. I am going to consult with Scott Falci, who has done research in DREZ.He has found that intramedullary electrophysiological guidance of the lesioning can greatly improve outcomes. Was this part of your procedure? Does anyone out there know anything about this approach?

    Has anyone else had DREZ for central pain without paralysis? Though the pain is bad, I am not sure I would trade it for the inability to use my hands.

    My pain is worst in my hands but includes my arms, lower legs, scalp, and face. I take Neurontin, Topomax, Ultram, and Methadone.
    --Robin

  9. #9

    DREZ or not to DREZ

    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Dzoker View Post
    What is the DREZ Procedure?

    The DREZ procedure is an operation for patients who have pain that never seems to go away. This type of pain is often called chronic, intractable pain.
    DREZ stands for dorsal root entry zone, which is the area of the spine where the surgery is performed. The dorsal root entry zone is the pain pathway to the brain. People feel pain when the pain signal passes from the part of the body that hurts to the brain along this pathway.
    If this pain pathway is blocked, then the pain signal cannot reach the brain and no pain is felt. In the DREZ procedure, this pathway is blocked deliberately to stop the pain signal from passing to the brain.
    For example, if you cut your finger, the pain signal moves up a nerve in your arm and across to your spinal column. It then travels into your spinal cord through the dorsal root entry zone and finally into your brain. Only then do you feel the pain in your finger.

    How Does the DREZ Procedure Block the Pain Pathway?

    In order to reach the dorsal root entry zone, the doctor removes a small piece of bone from the spinal column. This procedure is called a laminectomy. Once the dorsal root entry zone is visible, a small probe is placed in the area and the tip of the probe is heated. The heating process destroys a small part of the nerve root, which stops or slows the pain signal being sent to the brain. Pain is not felt if the pain signal cannot reach the brain.

    Can the DREZ Procedure Relieve All Types of Pain?

    The DREZ procedure cannot relieve all types of pain. It seems to work best in the case of pain caused by damage to the spinal cord or to large nerves that lead to the spinal cord.
    The Types of pain most likely to be helped by the DREZ procedure are:
    * Facial pain (Tic Douloureux).
    * Phantom limb pain (pain that occurs after an amputation).
    * Occipital neuralgia (a type of headache).
    * Trauma to the spinal cord or to large nerves that lead to the spinal cord.
    * Some types of pain caused by cancer.
    * Some types of pain caused by neurologic conditions, such as multiple sclerosis.
    Each of these conditions has a different success rate with the DREZ procedure. Your doctor can explain how much pain relief you are likely to experience following the DREZ procedure.

    Where Will My Incision Be?

    The DREZ procedure takes place on the spinal cord, which begins at the top of your neck and runs all the way down your back. The area of the spinal cord where the procedure is performed depends on the location of your pain.
    For facial pain and some types of headaches, the surgery is performed on the back of the neck, which sometimes requires the opening of the bone at the back of the head. This type of DREZ is called the caudalis DREZ.
    For arm, hand, chest and back pain, the surgery takes place further down the spine and is called a cervical, thoracic or lumbar DREZ. The cervical DREZ procedure is performed at the shoulder and neck level. The thoracic DREZ procedure is performed at the middle back level. The lumbar DREZ procedure is performed in the lower back, around the hip area.
    For leg and/or foot pain, the procedure is performed low on the back and is known as a conus DREZ.

    Will There Be Any Side Effects from the DREZ Procedure?

    With all surgeries, there are unpleasant changes known as side effects, as well as the possibility of complications. Below are side effects that you may experience following the DREZ procedure.
    Loss of feeling and temperature sensitivity
    The dorsal root entry zone, the pain pathway to the brain, also carries signals that tell the brain about sensation (feeling) and temperature. Once the dorsal root entry zone has been blocked and pain signals no longer can reach the brain, then sensation and temperature signals are blocked as well. For example, if you suffered facial pain that was treated successfully with the DREZ procedure, you no longer would feel pain in that area, but you will not have sensation or temperature sensitivity either.
    Weakness
    You may have weakness on the side of your body on which the DREZ procedure was performed. This weakness may also make it difficult for you to tell where your arm or leg is in relation to your body. Knowing where your arm or leg is in relation to your body is known as proprioception.
    People with normal proprioception can tell, with their eyes closed, whether their arms and legs are resting in their laps, on a table or extended in front of them. Those who have experienced a loss of proprioception cannot tell without looking where their arms and legs are. This loss of proprioception can make simple tasks such as walking, eating, driving, brushing teeth or combing hair more difficult.
    Even if you experience no loss of proprioception, you may have weakness in your arm or leg, which also can make everyday activities more challenging. These problems generally disappear within six months after surgery, but it is possible that they could be permanent conditions.
    Pain
    Like any surgery, the DREZ procedure causes pain from the incision, the cut made through the skin and tissue. You also may experience some local swelling and muscle spasms. After your surgery, you will receive pain medication to relieve this pain and any accompanying swelling or spasms. We will do everyting possible to keep you comfortable during your post-surgical recovery period.
    Other Side Effects
    In rare cases, more serious side effects and complications can occur. The doctors and nurses caring for you are well-trained to handle these situations. Agreat deal of time is spent monitoring your medical history, blood work and x-rays to prevent any serious problems.

    This Information is Provided via A Guide For Patients And Their Families in Regards To the DREZ Surgery at REX HEALTHCARE 4420 Lake Boone Trail Raleigh, NC 27607 tel (919) 783-3163 Dr. Dennis Bullard Raleigh Neurosurgery More Information Re DREZ Surgery for your Burning pain.

    THANK YOU! I'll be reading his article many times as will my wife as we ponder to drez or not to drez
    Gary Is = L-1 Para for 34 years.....................
    ~~~~~~~~~~

  10. #10
    Was it Larry Flint or Dr. Nashold who assited in your surgery?

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