Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Unbelieveable!!

  1. #1

    Unbelieveable!!

    Check this out, I can't beleive all of these can thin your blood, and you should stop taking before surgery. All we're ever really told is aspirin, nasd's, etc. Why don't the doctors give us a list like this one? It also shows the ones we can take instead. This really makes me mad, especially when it's bleeding that causes scar tissue, which could cause more surgeries to remove more scar tissue that we could have possibly avoided.

    I wonder how many millions of people have taken these drugs or herbs prior to surgery, not having a clue. Especially us with all our spine related surgeries.

    Table 1. Preoperative Discontinuation Guidelines for "Blood Thinners"*#

    Aspirin-Containing Products
    Stop 14 Days Prior To Surgery***
    NSAIDs
    (Days Prior To Surgery To Discontinue Therapy)
    Miscellaneous Medications
    (Days Prior To Surgery To Discontinue Therapy)

    Acetylsalicylic acid
    Aggrenox®
    Alka-Seltzer®
    Anacin®
    Arthritis Pain Formula®
    Arthritis Pain Reliever®
    Ascriptin® products
    Aspergum®
    Aspirin products
    Axotal®
    Baby Aspirin
    Buffaprin®
    Bufferin®
    Cope®
    Darvon Compound®
    Darvon Compound 65®
    Darvon-N Compound®
    Ecotrin®
    Empirin®
    Equagesic®
    Fiorinal®
    4-Way Cold®
    Genprin®
    Goody's Headache 4-Way Cold®
    Goody's Tabs-XS®
    Halfprin®
    Lanorinal®
    Magnaprin®
    Measurin®
    Midol Max Strength®
    Norgesic®
    Percodan®
    Powder 4-Way Cold®
    Robaxisal®
    Roxiprin®
    Sine-Off®
    Synalgos®
    Triaminicin Cold®
    Trigesic®
    Ursinus Inlay®
    Vanquish®
    Zorprin® Ibuprofen (1 day)
    Advil®
    Bayer Select®
    Excedrin IB®
    Haltran®
    Ibuprin®
    Medipren®
    Midol Cramp Formula®
    Midol IB®
    Motrin®
    Nuprin®
    Pamprin IB®
    Rufen®
    Diclofenac (2 days)
    Arthrotec®
    Cataflam®
    Voltaren®
    Diflunisal (1 day)
    Dolobid®
    Etodolac (2 days)
    Lodine®
    Fenoprofen (1 day)
    Nalfon®
    Flurbiprofen (2 days)
    Ansaid®
    Indomethacin (1 day)
    Indameth®
    Indocin®
    Ketoprofen (2 days)
    Orudis®
    Oruvail®
    Ketorolac (2 days)
    Toradol®
    Meclofenamate (2 days)
    Meclodium®
    Mefenamic acid (2 days)
    Ponstel®
    Meloxicam (4 days)
    Mobic®
    Nabumetone (4 to 5 days)
    Relafen®
    Naproxen (4 days)
    Aleve®
    Anaprox®
    Naprosyn®
    Oxaprozin (12 days)
    Daypro®
    Piroxicam (14 days)
    Feldene®
    Sulindac (1 day)
    Clinoril®
    Tolmetin (2 days)
    Tolectin®
    Tolectin DS® Cilostazol (2 days)
    Pletal®
    Clopidogrel (7 days)
    Plavix®
    Dipyridamole (2 days)
    Persantine®
    Garlic (7 days)
    Ginkgo (2 days)
    Ginseng (7 days)
    St. John's Wort (5 days)
    Sulfinpyrazone (1 day)
    Anturane®
    Ticlopidine (7 to 10 days)
    Ticlid®
    * This is not an all-inclusive list.

    # Ingredients in these products (particularly over-the-counter products) may change and new products are continually being marketed; therefore, it is extremely important to read the label and/or package insert of all of the medications your patient may be taking to determine if they contain ingredients that may increase the risk of bleeding.



    Table 2. Medications that do NOT affect platelet function and may be used for pain relief in the presurgical setting*#

    Acetaminophen
    NSAIDs
    Miscellaneous Medications

    Allerest No Drowsiness®
    Anacin 3®
    Darvocet®§
    Datril®
    Esgic®
    Excedrin PM®
    Fioricet®
    Midol Multi-Symptom Formula®
    Midol Maximum Strength PMS" Pamprin®
    Panadol®
    Premsyn PMS®
    Tylenol® Choline salicylate
    Arthropan®
    Trilisate®
    Celecoxib
    Celebrex®
    Magnesium salicylate
    Doan's®
    Magsal®
    Mobigesic®
    Momentum®
    Trilisate®
    Rofecoxib
    Vioxx®
    Salsalate
    Disalcid®
    Salsitab®
    Sodium salicylate Valdecoxib
    Bextra® Propoxyphene §
    Darvocet®
    Darvon®
    Darvon N®
    Tramadol
    Ultracet®
    Ultram®
    * This is not an all-inclusive list.

    # Ingredients in these products (particularly over-the-counter products) may change and new products are continually being marketed; therefore, it is extremely important to read the label and/or package insert of all of the medications your patient may be taking to determine if they contain ingredients that may increase the risk of bleeding.


    Here are the herbal ones: GARLIC, GINKGO, GINSENG, and ST. JOHN's WORT. A recent study by Ang-Lee et al reviewed the literature on commonly used herbal medicines in the perioperative setting and developed guidelines for presurgical discontinuation of these products.8 Of the eight herbal medications studied, three herbs, garlic, ginkgo and ginseng, may have pharmacological effects on platelet function. Garlic may potentially irreversibly block platelet function and should be discontinued at least 7 days prior to surgery. Ginkgo has multiple potential mechanisms of action, such as altering vasoregulation, serving as an antioxidant, modulating the activities of neurotransmitters and receptors, and inhibiting platelet aggregation. In the perioperative setting, patients should be instructed to stop taking gingko a minimum of 36 hours before surgery based on pharmacokinetic data and the possibility for bleeding. Ginseng is composed of different ginsenosides that might block platelet aggregation in vitro. A study in laboratory rats showed that ginsenosides increased coagulation time of thrombin and activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT). Since the inhibition of platelet aggregation by ginsenosides is potentially irreversible, it is recommended that patients discontinue ginseng at least 7 days prior to surgery.

    The relevant pharmacological effects of St. John's Wort may not be directly related to platelet aggregation. However, the guidelines suggest that St. John's Wort should be stopped 5 days before surgery in patients who might need oral anticoagulation postoperatively because St. John's Wort may induce cytochrome isoform, P4502C9, which is responsible for warfarin metabolism.8

    I got this info from the University of Iowa's Health Care site, just typing in blood thinners in Google.

    [This message was edited by Monkeygirl on Jun 06, 2002 at 02:50 PM.]

  2. #2
    Wow, Thanks, Monkeygirl - good info for all! Don't ya love that Google?!

    _____________
    Tough times don't last - tough people do.

  3. #3

    Thanks MG

    That is a lot of info. Incredibly there are so many things which we are not aware of and many times some doctors don't take the time to tell us either.

    Your post also has helped me to find out more about what affects platelet count. Keep up all the great work you are doing. In helping yourself, you have helped us also.

    Raven

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •