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Thread: internal morphine pumps

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Yorkville,NY ,USA
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    7

    internal morphine pumps

    I,m attending college right now, but I'm finding it terribly difficult because of the daze and lack of memory I'm suffering. 3600mg's Neurotin,60mg's Baclofen and evening doses of Percocet and Valium I'm sure aren't helping. I was wondering if anyone has any information as to what type of pain a Morphine pump might provide? Thanks, Tom

  2. #2
    What type of pain are you having problems with?

    David Berg

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Yorkville,NY ,USA
    Posts
    7

    morphine pump

    Both neuropathic and ,excuse me, but I don't know what the name would be for just common pain from smashed vertabraes and torn muscle. Tom

  4. #4
    Well, as I'm certain you already realize, the "normal" pain (sometimes referred to as nociceptive pain) is much easier to treat than your neuropathic pain. Any of a number of traditional painkillers may help with that part of your pain.

    The neuropathic pain is the real bugger. People have varying degrees of luck finding any degree of relief. Neuropathic pain from damage to peripheral nerves is stubborn, but occasionally it's a little easier to treat to some extent. This can include peripheral nerves just outside of the spinal cord. Neuropathic pain to the central nervous system is much more stubborn. You've already tried some of the things that help some people.

    Traditional painkillers, even opiates, simply aren't effective for most neuropathic pain. The object, then, is usually to find a drug that will help calm the nervous system. This can be a long and frustrating process, with varying degrees of success. And while any degree of relief is welcome, most only find partial relief. This is why I am so strong on advocating more funds for additional pain research. We need a drug that is effective for everyone. For now, the best approach is often a multi-disciplinary approach that can include anything from biofeedback to acupuncture to drugs to psychology to physical therapy. The one thing I caution against is surgery. There are only very limited circumstances where I see a place for surgery, such as terminal patients with a short life expectancy. The problem is that all too often the pain relief from surgery is temporary, and the pain can return more horrible than before.

    I'm guess I'm just rambling now, and I wish I had a better answer. Mary Simpson runs a site at http://www.centralpain.org, and also has an email list that is an excellent support network. She has a list compiled of drugs that people report has helped them with some facet of their pain. Keep in mind that this list is just a list of things that people reported benefit from and there's no way of knowing what type of pain each drug may have helped with. It's strictly anecdotal.

    I wish you well.

    David Berg

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