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Thread: Botox injection for bladder problems

  1. #1

    Botox injection for bladder problems

    Saturday, 25 May, 2002, 23:57 GMT 00:57 UK
    Botox injection for bladder problems
    Botox is used for cosmetic surgery

    Botox injections used to reduce facial wrinkles can help treat bladder complaints, researchers have found.

    The use of the botulism toxin has rapidly become one of the world's most popular forms of cosmetic surgery.

    The use of botox injections can offer many of these patients a safe, but temporary, solution to this embarrassing problem

    Professor Michael Chancellor But researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have found that injections of the same toxin can help treat people who suffer from an overactive bladder.

    Botox injections have shown promise as a treatment for a variety of problems with the lower urinary tract.

    Professor Michael Chancellor, an expert in urology and gynaecology at the University of Pittsburgh, said: "Bladder dysfunction affects a staggering number of people worldwide.

    "The use of botox injections can offer many of these patients a safe, but temporary, solution to this embarrassing problem."

    In the study, 50 patients were injected with botox into the bladder or urethra.
    The patients suffered from a variety of conditions, including multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury and stroke.

    Incontinence

    However, in each case they were suffering from involuntary contractions of the bladder muscle.

    This either caused incontinence, or an inability to completely empty the bladder.

    Forty-one of the 50 patients reported a decrease or absence of incontinence after the injections.

    The improvement was seen within seven days of the injection and symptoms were alleviated for approximately six months.

    None of the patients experienced long-term complications from the treatment.
    Botox acts by binding to the nerve endings of muscles, blocking the release of the chemical that causes the muscle to contract.

    When injected into specific muscles, the muscle becomes paralyzed or weakened, but leaves surrounding muscles unaffected, allowing for normal muscle function.

    Details of the study were published at a meeting of the American Urological Association.

  2. #2
    Sorry folks - I just can't get my mind around injecting botulism toxin into a body - even at homeopathic doses, and even tho I've read all the studies, and talked with people who have done it. It just creeps me out! Does anyone else feel this way, or am I being just a little neurotic?

    _____________
    Tough times don't last - tough people do.

  3. #3
    I had it injected in my bladder a few months ago but didn't get any results from it, but glad I gave it a try anyway it was a pretty simple procedure.

  4. #4
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    botox

    I just seen about botox for the bladder on the evening news .My husband is sci and he has had botox injections a few time in his arms for spastisisty and he will be getting more soon it works.He will be useing it as a threapy .His insurance pays for it he is on medicare and gate way which is welfare

  5. #5
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    University of Pittsburgh researchers use botox to treat overactive bladder
    ORLANDO, May 25 - Botulinum toxin A (BTX) injections, commonly known as botox, show promise as a treatment for a variety of lower urinary tract dysfunctions, according to a study presented by University of Pittsburgh researchers at the American Urological Association Centennial Celebration Annual Meeting. Results will be published in abstract 98 in the AUA proceedings.
    "Bladder dysfunction affects a staggering number of people worldwide. The use of botox injections can offer many of these patients a safe, but temporary, solution to this embarrassing problem," said Michael Chancellor, M.D., professor of urology and gynecology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

    In the study, 50 patients were injected with BTX into the bladder or urethra. Patients suffered from a variety of voiding dysfunctions, including multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke, overactive bladder, and interstitial cystitis (IC). Each experienced involuntary contractions of the bladder muscle, which either caused incontinence typified by either uncontrolled voiding of urine or the inability to completely empty the bladder.

    Forty-one of the 50 patients, or 82 percent, reported a decrease or absence of incontinence after the injections. The decrease was seen within seven days of the injection and symptoms were alleviated for approximately six months. None of the patients experienced long-term complications from the treatment such as stress incontinence or urinary retention.

    BTX acts by binding to the nerve endings of muscles, blocking the release of the chemical that causes the muscle to contract. When injected into specific muscles, the muscle becomes paralyzed or weakened, but leaves surrounding muscles unaffected, allowing for normal muscle function.

    Common urologic conditions like neurogenic detrusor hyperreflexia and overactive bladder are caused by involuntary contractions of the detrusor muscle, which controls the bladder. This new therapy helps alleviate the contractions, restoring normal bladder function.

    Over 17 million Americans suffer from overactive bladder, a condition that significantly affects the patient's quality of life. An estimated 80 percent of these patients do not seek help or treatment for this condition. Overactive bladder is characterized by the following conditions: frequency, urinating more than eight times in a 24 hour period; urgency, the immediate and strong urge to urinate; and urge incontinence, the inability to suppress urgency resulting in the leaking or loss of urine.


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  6. #6
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Overactive Bladder Treated by Botox. Botulinum toxin A (BTX) injections, commonly known as botox, show promise as a treatment for a variety of lower urinary tract dysfunctions, according to a study presented by University of Pittsburgh researchers at the American Urological Association (AUA) Centennial Celebration Annual Meeting.
    "Bladder dysfunction affects a staggering number of people worldwide. The use of botox injections can offer many of these patients a safe, but temporary, solution to this embarrassing problem," said Michael Chancellor, M.D., professor of urology and gynecology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

    In the study, 50 patients were injected with BTX into the bladder or urethra.

    Patients suffered from a variety of voiding dysfunctions, including multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke, overactive bladder, and interstitial cystitis (IC).

    Each experienced involuntary contractions of the bladder muscle, which either caused incontinence typified by either uncontrolled voiding of urine or the inability to completely empty the bladder.

    Forty-one of the 50 patients, or 82 percent, reported a decrease or absence of incontinence after the injections.

    The decrease was seen within seven days of the injection and symptoms were alleviated for approximately six months. None of the patients experienced long-term complications from the treatment such as stress incontinence or urinary retention.

    BTX acts by binding to the nerve endings of muscles, blocking the release of the chemical that causes the muscle to contract. When injected into specific muscles, the muscle becomes paralyzed or weakened, but leaves surrounding muscles unaffected, allowing for normal muscle function.

    Common urologic conditions like neurogenic detrusor hyperreflexia and overactive bladder are caused by involuntary contractions of the detrusor muscle, which controls the bladder.

    This new therapy helps alleviate the contractions, restoring normal bladder function.

    Over 17 million Americans suffer from overactive bladder, a condition that significantly affects the patient's quality of life. An estimated 80 percent of these patients do not seek help or treatment for this condition.

    Overactive bladder is characterized by the following conditions: frequency, urinating more than eight times in a 24 hour period; urgency, the immediate and strong urge to urinate; and urge incontinence, the inability to suppress urgency resulting in the leaking or loss of urine.

    Results will be published in abstract 98 in the AUA proceedings.

    May 26, 2002

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  7. #7
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Botox Helps Some Urinary Problems

    Botox Helps Some Urinary Problems

    By Jeanie Davis
    WebMD Medical News Reviewed By Gary Vogin, MD



    May 25, 2002 -- Botox isn't just for crow's feet anymore. Strange as it may sound, people with serious bladder problems may get some relief from a Botox injection.


    Botox -- one of the world's most toxic substances -- blocks the ability of nerves to tell muscles to contract. "Wherever you put it, that muscle will not be able to contract until the nerve grows back in about four to six months," explains Michael Chancellor, MD, professor of urology and gynecology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.


    He presented his study at the American Urological Association annual meeting today.


    "It's pretty cool," Chancellor tells WebMD. "People think Botox is just for facial wrinkles. But just like the face, the bladder and other internal organs are mostly made of muscle. When those internal organs spasm, Botox can quiet them down."


    Chancellor's patients had a variety of disorders -- multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke, and overactive bladder. They also had urinary problems caused by muscle spasms in the bladder or in the sphincter, which is the valve that controls urine release. Some were not able to control their bladder -- what's known as "urge incontinence." Some were completely unable to urinate and needed a catheterization.


    "These were not people with a mild problem," Chancellor tells WebMD. "They had tried every drug out there without success."


    After receiving Botox injections into the bladder or the urethra, 41 of the 50 patients -- 82% -- reported a decrease or absence of their urinary problems, he reports.


    "Approximately two-thirds of the patients had significant improvement," he tells WebMD. Also, none of the patients had any long-term complications, such as stress incontinence -- a minor leakage problem that occurs when you laugh, sneeze, or cough.


    "If you've tried exercise and pills, if you're really miserable and changing diapers a couple of times a day, Botox may be able to help you," he says.


    The downside: it's an invasive procedure (it needs to be done under light sedation), it must be redone every six months or so, and it's expensive, says Chancellor. "Insurance companies don't want to cover Botox. That's been the biggest problem."


    "Certainly it's a viable option, even though the duration of effect may be relatively short-lived," says Niall Galloway, MD, medical director of the Emory Continence Center at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.


    Trouble is, too many patients wait too long before getting treatment for their incontinence problem -- which makes it harder to treat, Galloway tells WebMD. "They are looking for a resolution to problems that oftentimes have been there for as long as seven years. With almost everything in medicine, the longer you have it, the harder it is to reverse it simply. So if you get on the problem early -- certainly within months -- it's easier to treat."


    While there are numerous treatments for urge incontinence, the problem is also related to drinking excess fluids such as coffee or soda, or eating chocolate, spicy foods, and fruits rich in potassium -- all of which stimulate bladder contractions.


    Incontinence problems sometimes are caused by another condition such as pregnancy, uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts, urinary tract infections, a constipated bowel, or bladder tumors, Galloway tells WebMD. "You need to be quite clear that it is a bladder problem, not another condition that is causing similar symptoms."



    © 2002 WebMD Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    You're not being neurotic, Marmalady. I had several series of shots in my right hand and arm for a contracture. The last series WAS the last series. I completely lost one of the pronator muscles in my wrist. I can't pick up hot drinks anymore with that hand because it just wants to flip over. I'll chance cold but I've been burned once. And for cosmetic uses? No way! It's serious medicine and should be in the "last resort" column IMO. I also read an article after losing that muscle that botox can travel within the body. That was enough to tell the neuro to forget it and he was really good at this stuff.

  9. #9
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    i had this procedure done it worked for me but it wore off atfter 5 months

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