Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Wheelchair Racing

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    B.C.,Canada
    Posts
    202
    If I knew what I need I wouldn't ask hehehe
    what is normal for light training?
    Ok another quick question for kiran my last outing I put on 20km on a track (50 laps 400m track) My last kick, after a break, was 20 laps (8km) in 30 mins is this a good start point? am I a good candidate fro racing or do i need much more work to even try to compete. And as soon as spring hits I will have use of the track for training.

  2. #12
    Ian,

    8km in 30 minutes is a kick ass time if you're starting out. You're more than ready to compete. I did my first 10k competetively at 56 minutes. Keep in mind, everyone who starts out will have slower times and be seeded at the bottom. As much as you hate it, it's the start of anyone's race experience. If a person isn't willing to build a thick skin by losing a couple of times, it'll be hard if you choose to hit the big leagues.

    It's unfortunate that racing doesn't have as large of a following in Canada as it does in Europe or even the States. Because of that, the only place you'll find a lot of racers are in the bigger cities, those being Vancouver and Victoria. I'm unsure of anyone else who lives in Cranbrook. The only other areas outside of these two cities that have a fairly large WC sports group are either Kelowna or Kamloops. I think they have a better basketball program, but I do know of a couple of racers out there. Regardless of this fact, if you really want to get into racing, don't let this get in your way. Go online, and look up provincial records. (www.wcraceseries.com) Look at the times that guys in your class would have. I can't remember what level your injury is, but I'm guessing you would fall under the t54 category. (As long as you have most of your back muscles and some of your abs, you'll be considered a t54). Then, as suggested, get on rollers, and push, as much as you can. You want to work on volume right now, just to build up your endurance. The downside to training on your own is that you're missing out on learning the technique of the stroke, which is pretty crucial when you're starting out. The last thing you want to do is push huge volumes, but be pushing wrong. BUT!!!! Don't let this stop you. If you're really set on racing, and you want to see how the other racers do it, send me an address where I can send you some of the videos I have watched over and over again. I completely understand if you don't want to be giving out your address to a complete stranger, so I could get you contact info and see if they have some videos on hand that you could borrow.

    Then, in March, we are having our provincial training camp. This is for all sorts of athletes. The experienced show up to help out the inexperienced, which I think kicks some serious ass. Try to see if you can come down for that weekend, because it would be very beneficial to you. The biggest reason being that you will get classified here, officially, by a group of ppl who have been trained as classifiers. This puts you in a specific class (most likely t54) and then you'll get a series of standards that the top athletes in your class are achieving.

    If you can, show up for the Sun Run, which happens mid-April. It's our first big 10k, and it has the most attendance. Most of the new racers show up to this race because they get great support, and it's a positive experience for everyone.

    It sounds like you're really interested in this sport. Trust me, if you want to race, the time and energy you put into it will be worth it. I could go on about how much racing has affected my life, but this post isn't about me, it's about you.

    The times you are going to look up are provincial records. These dudes have been racing for quite some time. This is something you should be aiming for, not achieving on your first race. The reason I tell you to look up the times is because that will be your competition, not other local racers, because by the sounds of it, they are quite scarce.

    Let me know if I can be of any more assistance.

    Good Luck, it'd be great to finally meet you!!

    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." - Oscar Wilde

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    B.C.,Canada
    Posts
    202
    Kiran, thank you very much for all the information I'll try to remember to get hold of you nearer to the march and april events to see if I can make it down or not. But for now I'll start working on my cardio and keep praying the sun comes out so I can use the track. I have watched a bit of wheelchair racing on tv and online but its hard to tell if you are pushing properly without someone to critique it for you. My chair is somewhat out of date but still in very good shape so I hope to be able to use it. It's an old shadow chair with the front forks way more tilted upright than the newer chairs are. It does what I need it to so far and I'm too cheap/poor to buy a new one.

  4. #14
    Ian,

    We need to get you a loaner, buddy. That chair's wayyyy too old. I could prolly set you up with one of Kelly Smith's old race chairs. Most ppl starting out usually get his old ones as a loaner. There is only the issue of transporting it to you, and making sure it's a decent fit. Take measurements of this chair, see how much room you have on each side of you, btw your body and the bucket, and let me know. I'll track down the equipments dude, and see what they have on hand. If anyone's making a road trip to Cranbrook anytime soon, they may be able to help you out.

    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." - Oscar Wilde

  5. #15
    Ian,

    Here's a link to the Loan Program. I work with Richard personally, so I can see what I can do for you also.

    http://www.bcwheelchairsports.com/bc...ndingindex.htm
    Good luck..

    Kiran

    "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all." - Oscar Wilde

  6. #16
    How does everyone train for this esp in the off season when you have snow to contend with and no place to practice indoors. I use a handbike inside plus lifting some weights.
    I would like to get into some type of racing , not a full blown schedule, in the local area just try out a few local races in the season coming. Advice on where to start where to look. I do plan on doing a few local running events (like a 10km road course) but I would like to see how others race and how I stack up. I'm the only person I know of that does any kind of racing sports in my area or that even has a racing chair (its old but decent still)
    Any help would be greatly apreciated.

    [Jeff - I edited your post so it doesn't appear like a quote of canuck-off. You might get better answers that way. BTW, being a Jeff myself I noticed you spelling you name backwards. ]

    [This message was edited by Jeff on 01-31-04 at 12:52 PM.]

  7. #17
    I know there was a topic here about Bob Hall, but I can't find it. Anyone know what happened to him?
    Check out:
    http://www.wheelchairjunkie.com/bobhall.html
    He is a real adaptive sports pioneer and we ALL have a lot to thank him for.
    Carl

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •