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Thread: So, when will Rutgers have wheelchair basketball?

  1. #11
    SledHockeyGirl, you have brought up some very good points. It would be nice if the state you reside in does not offer a wheelchair sports program, in order to keep you on a par with programs they offer for the able body students, they should subsidize your cost for having to go out of state. Now anyone from New Jersey who goes out of state has to pay higher non-resident tuition and in addition loses the state grant for higher education from his or her home state.

    [This message was edited by bigbob on 12-23-03 at 05:08 PM.]

  2. #12
    "College athletics used to be about participation and a well-rounded education. Today, that notion is about as quaint as doing term paper research in the library instead of on the Internet. Today, the college sports behemoth must be fed tons of cash -- for the $2 million football coach's salary, for the weight room and athletic department offices that get renovated five times as often as the cancer lab, for debt service on the stadium and arena, for 85 football scholarships, for booster club cocktail parties. These athletic programs have become corporations, and poorly run ones at that." complete story from Miami Herald

    08/03/2001 - Updated 10:10 AM ET





    Top college coaches getting top dollar

    By Steve Wieberg, USA TODAY complete article


    "By Peter Cosgrove, AP
    Florida State's Bobby Bowden was the first college football coach to hit the $1 million mark, while Florida's Steve Spurrier now tops the sport's salary list with a $2.1 million deal."

    "Count it out. Two million dollars. Guaranteed. What Bob Stoops will make as the University of Oklahoma football coach this season is more than the average American wage earner will see in a lifetime. It's roughly 25 times what the average college professor will pull down in the coming school year. The figure is so sizable it disgusts some in higher education - an example, they say, of how far many colleges and universities have strayed from their basic mission, from teaching and research to the pursuit of athletic reputation and the purveyance of entertainment."

    ________________________________________

    And There is no money for 5 students to play recreational wheelchair basketball at Rutgers

    [This message was edited by bigbob on 12-24-03 at 12:38 PM.]

  3. #13
    Another important aspect of providing greater opportunities in the school setting - especially in those areas that interest kids with disabilities, is that these kids will be more likely to attend those schools where their participation is encouraged. Also, with more schools having programs that are in state and AFFORDABLE, more kids and their families will not have cost as a barrier to higher education.

    Over 70% of people with disabilities are unemployed.

    More educated people with disabilities = more in the workforce = Less DEPENDENCE on Gov't = MORE INDEPENDENCE and Control of Lives = Less isolation/More Participation = More Civic Engagement = More Community Activism = More Political Leadership = More Power in Effecting Change = Faster SCI Cure.

  4. #14
    TITLE 34--EDUCATION

    CHAPTER I--OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

    PART 104--NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE--Table of Contents

    Subpart D--Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education

    Sec. 104.37 Nonacademic services.

    (a) General. (1) A recipient to which this subpart applies shall
    provide non-academic and extracurricular services and activities in such
    manner as is necessary to afford handicapped students an equal
    opportunity for participation in such services and activities.
    (2) Nonacademic and extracurricular services and activities may
    include counseling services, physical recreational athletics............

  5. #15
    Aside from the needed physical activity, and removing the inequities in physical recreation there is another area that is also important. I am an able bodied parent. Although I love my son very much, there are certain areas that I really feel inadequate in understanding on a first hand basis. My son had caught the attention of a veteran road racer at an event. He asked my son to join him, and his crowd in their weekly pushing workout. I was thrilled. I'm sure they had discussions that I would not have known how to understand or relate to first hand. This bonding is a very important part of the sport. Another thing is that when my son was on the Lightning Wheels team, it seemed like most of the other athletes were from wealthy families. They all had beautiful vans to carry the racer and all sorts of electric air compressors and other gadgets. At first they stared at us when I transported my son's loaned race chair with rear wheels resting on the trunk of my car and front wheel tide to the roof with thick yellow string. To me it seems that SCI does not discriminate, but yet I think wheelchair sports is only available to someone that comes from a wealthy family. I hope the State University takes on the challenge to find these handicapped students and give them the kind of educational and recreational experience that they are guaranteed.

  6. #16
    Senior Member poonsuzanne's Avatar
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    Originally posted by bigbob:

    It seemed like most of the other athletes were from wealthy families. They all had beautiful vans to carry the racer and all sorts of electric air compressors and other gadgets. At first they stared at us when I transported my son's loaned race chair with rear wheels resting on the trunk of my car and front wheel tide to the roof with thick yellow string. To me it seems that SCI does not discriminate, but yet I think wheelchair sports is only available to someone that comes from a wealthy family.
    Bigbob, people don't usually look at your wheelchair-related gear. People will normally dig into yours and your son's individuality, personality, ambitions, achievements, etc.. You will be welcome and admired by others in any circle of life if you possess the aforesaid qualities. Don't worry! Suzanne

  7. #17
    Suzanne, you are right in what you say, but I was trying to say that wheelchair sport is usually only played by the kids that come from wealthy families, and usually children from poor families don't get a chance.

  8. #18
    Senior Member poonsuzanne's Avatar
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    Bigbob, sorry that I misunderstood your post! My son, Richard, has not started any wheelchair sports yet, so it may be rather hard for me to realize that. Suzanne

  9. #19
    Money is a factor, but also, and more importantly, the discrimination between paraplegic and quadriplegics in wheelchair sports. There is much LESS access to these athletic sports, especially competive, for quads. There is a definite bias towards supporting paras in sports than those with more higher level injuries. I can understand why. It is much easier to support, since paras are mostly independent, less supports being necessary to enable them to participate. Paras are also easier to promote, and gain sponsorship for. Since it isn't that remarkable that a para succeeds in a w/c sport, their "achievements" can easily be promoted. Adding the "cripple" factor helps too, but we all know that that is merely a tool to gain sympathy from the public by workin the "hero" and "courage" myth. eh, if it helps to get the $$$, work it, but discrimination exists WITHIN SCI as well.

  10. #20
    Chick you are 100% right! There is discrimination. We can only work towards a perfect society and in the meantime try to make some changes.

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