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Thread: digital cameras

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    digital cameras

    Does anyone have any suggestions for adapting a digital camera to make it easier to focus and/or fire. I'm looking for some ideas. Any web sites?

  2. #2
    hey... photography is one of my hobbies; i haven't gone fully digital yet, but here's what i use...

    i have a simple digital point-and-shoot camera, an Olympus D-360L. nothing fancy, no zoom, autofocus, etc. basically point & click. i have a c6/7 injury and due to lack of hand function i can't press the shutter release... with this camera i've enabled the self timer & wait 10-15 seconds while holding it in the position i wanted. that method seemed to work well, but it got annoying & i felt pretty limited by it.

    what i use 90% of the time is a Canon SLR film-based system. I have an EOS Elan 7e body with a couple lenses: a 50mm prime and a 70-200mm zoom. again, the issue of pressing the shutter release comes up. what i stumbled upon was a remote cable switch that plugs into the side of the body, normally used with a tripod. but... it works extremely well for me to use my mouth... it's kinda goofy but if i rest the switch on one of my teeth it frees up my hands for stabilizing the camera, zooming, etc. the Elan 7e is one of Canon's autofocus bodies; when coupled with a compatible lens all that it takes to focus is pressing the shutter button halfway (also operable w/ the remote switch). one other crazy feature, that isn't necessary at all (but nice) is an eye-controlled focusing system -- when the shutter button is held halfway to enable the autofocus, the camera has a sensor built into it that will track your eye movement so whatever you're looking at will be the focusing point.

    -----------------------
    SUGGESTIONS:

    accessible systems: honestly, i have no idea. just go to camera stores & physically try out different options. it's all trial & error for what i've seen... but there is a lot out there!

    ok, i personaly am biased towards two major companies: Canon & Nikon. both have tons of options, accessories, and camera types. if you have limitations using your hands, opt for some camera that will work w/ some sort of remote shutter release. both Nikon and Canon have these. my suggestion, if you're set on digital, is to go w/ a Nikon Coolpix camera (any model)... they're great & i've seen them used w/ remotes (well, the 900 series at least but i think they're all compatible -- look into it first). also check out the Canon Powershot line... they're great as well but i'm not sure about the remote accessories though. also check out Olympus digital models... i don't know much about the current ones; sorry... but they're good as well.

    if you're thinking something more along the lines of digital SLR, be ready to shell out a LOT. a digital system + lenses will easily run you $3000-4000 on the low end, but it offers a lot of versatility (the Canon 1-D is $5500 w/o lenses... yikes!!!)
    --------------

    WEBSITES:
    makers:
    -Canon (www.usa.canon.com & www.powershot.com)
    -Nikon (www.nikonusa.com)
    -Olympus (www.olympus.com)
    reviews:
    www.photographyreview.com
    www.photo.net
    stores:
    -B&H photo (www02.bhphotovideo.com)

    ------------------------
    about digital... i have full intention of migrating to a fully digital system in the future, but the technology is developing quickly & i'm waiting for a 6+ megapixel body to be released before i consider it. currently the closest system i would look at now is the Canon D-30, but it's not cheap ($2500 for the 3MP body). mind you, this is an SLR system used with interchangable lenses. for me it is A LOT CHEAPER to shoot using film & develop on a PhotoCD (which has a standard max resolution of somewhere around 3000x2000 pixels -- MUCH greater than reasonably priced digital cameras will produce -- a 3 megapixel camera is somewhere around 2000x1500px).

    but it all depends what you want it for. if you're not planning on getting too serious & just want it for leisure and use on the web, get a one-piece digital camera -- it'll be MUCH cheaper than a SLR kit anyway. if you intend on making enlargements or want a ton of versatility in the picture taking process, go w/ film for now. as it is now, a 3 megapixel image will print well up to 8x10" 35mm negatives will give much more versatility (& are cheaper alltogether if you look at all the costs involved!!).

    hope this helped...

    have a merry Christmas & God Bless!!!

  3. #3
    Check out National Camera Exchange in Golden Valley. They can help you out. I know from personal experience.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    <<<what i use 90% of the time is a Canon SLR film-based system. I have an EOS Elan 7e body with a couple lenses: a 50mm prime and a 70-200mm zoom. again, the issue of pressing the shutter release comes up. what i stumbled upon was a remote cable switch that plugs into the side of the body, normally used with a tripod. >>

    WHERE did you find the shutter release cable and does the Canon have the dohinky on it to screw the cable into and to mount it on a tripod??? I have a tripod that I found that is perfect for getting in close with my chair to reload, change settings and whatever. But I am having the hardest time finding a camera with both the tripod mount fixture AND a shutter cable attachment point. We have tons of real beautiful birds that hang around our ground and mounted feeders and with snow on the schrubs in winter a gorgeous backdrop. I want to set something up so I can focus on one area and then wait, sitting about 10 feet back in the house and get pics without scaring some of the timid ones like Juncos and Titmice.

    Where did you get your set up? I'll be through southern Virginia in the next two weeks if it's a Mom and Pop shop only. But I really want to have this this winter. Thanks for any info you can give me.

    Sue

  5. #5
    sue,

    i don't know if i explained myself well enough... the RS60-E3 shutter release i have is specific to my camera. it is electronic and plugs into a mini-headphone-type jack on the side of the camera. i found a website that has a picture of the release cable:

    http://alaike.lcc.hawaii.edu/frary/elan7e5.htm

    you'll also notice an infrared, wireless, remote switch -- i don't own one but they're nice and allow you to be ~15 feet away from the camera. again, it is an accessory specific to the camera model, so it won't work on any others.

    this site has a number of views of my camera: http://www.steves-digicams.com/2001_reviews/elan7.html

    you'll notice in the "physical views" section, if you scroll down a little, two pictures next to each other of side views of the camera. the one on the right shows where the remote jack is (it looks like a little round button w/ the cap on).

    about the tripod mount, it's completely seperate from the shutter release and is in the standard location on the base of the camera (see the last picture under the "physical views" section of the above page). almost any tripod head works with mine.

    i purchased the majority of my equipment over the internet from a huge camera store based out of new york -- b & h photo and video. they have an extremely extensive selection of almost anything you could ever want that's camera-related. check out their website: www.bhphotovideo.com

    they're extremely knowledgable and will gladly help if you need anything... you can reach them via phone at: (800)-606-6969.

    let me know if you have any other questions

    ~scott

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Thanks Scott. Yes, on rereading your post I got the camera angle. My first 35mm was a Canon and it worked great right up until I dropped it about 50 feet to a sandy beach. The sand killed it not the drop. I'll check out that version here. There is a good camera shop near here but he doesn't always have the latest catalogs for all the companies. And these days the owner is spending a ton of time reading up on digitals. I want to stay with a regular old film camera for awhile longer. It seems the shooter doesn't have as much control with a digital as they do with a regular print. Geez, I was just thinking of how old I was when I first learned to take decent pictures. :-) Our 4-H club back in Wisconsin had a professional photographer volunteer to lead a group for a few years so we even got to develop some of our own stuff in his darkroom. Thanks again for the information. I appreciate it.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
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    cameras

    Thanks everyone!

    Weekender410 I have checked out National Camera Exchange and they are working with me. I only live a few miles away from them and they have been great help. I'll keep you posted on what I come up with.

    Thank again

  8. #8
    we bought a Sony Mavica FD87 about two weeks ago for my mom and dad for Christmas. We are all just amateurs to say the least, but I have been really impressed with the quality of the pictures and the simplicity of the camera. We have had a lot of fun with it over the past couple of weeks. Having the pictures on a floppy disk is great. I have not figured out how I will be able to use it, but it is still a lot of fun.

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