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Thread: CT scan results

  1. #1
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    CT scan results

    Hi can anyone help explain my CT results? They are as follows:

    Findings: There is exaggerated kyphosis demonstrated at the thoracolumbar junction. Tubular lucency with scleerotic margins project the pedicle of T8, T9, T10, L1, L2 and L3. Posterior decompression at the T11 level identified. Apparent anterior compression fractures of T11 and T12 identified, possibly burst fracture of T12. Posterior decompression at T11 delineated. Bone fragments project along the posterior elements from T7 level through L3 compatible with fusion. Some anterior end plate osteophytic spurring at T111/T12 identified. Sagittal reconstruction are not optimal for evaluation of the degree of compression and deformity of the vertebral bodies of T11 and T12. There are tiny bone densities which project along the posterior margin of the central canal at the T11 level. No apparent canal comptomise.
    Impression: Apparent remote injury T11/T12 with exaggerated kyphosis at the thoracolumbar junction and anterior compression fractures and/or burst fracture T11/T12 suspect. Posterior decompression T11 as well as posterior fusion multiple levels identified.
    Findings: There is normal aliignment. Vertebral bodies appear intact without acute fracture. No abnormal paraspinal soft tissue density.
    Impression: Negative CT upper thoracic spine imaging.

    studebaker911@hotmail.com

  2. #2

    Here is some of it (Dr. Young can help too)

    There is exaggerated kyphosis (OUTWARD ABNORMAL BEND) demonstrated at the thoracolumbar junction (WHERE YOUR THORACIC AND LUMBAR SPINE SECTIONS MEET).

    Tubular lucency with sclerotic margins project the pedicle of T8, T9, T10, L1, L2 and L3.

    Posterior decompression at the T11 level identified (YOU HAD A LAMINECTOMY AT THIS LEVEL IN THE PAST).

    Apparent anterior compression fractures of T11 and T12 identified, possibly burst fracture of T12. (YOU HAVE AN OLD COMPRESSION FRACTURE OF T11 and T12)

    Posterior decompression at T11 delineated. (REPEAT OF ABOVE)

    Bone fragments project along the posterior elements from T7 level through L3 compatible with fusion. (YOU HAD AN OLD SPINAL FUSION AT T7-L3)

    Some anterior end plate osteophytic spurring at T11/T12 identified. (YOU HAVE SOME OSTEOPHYTES OR BONE SPURS ON THE CANAL SIDE OF THE BODY OF T11 AND T12...CONSISTENT WITH OLD INJURY, ARTHRITIS OR JUST GETTING OLDER)

    Sagittal reconstruction are not optimal for evaluation of the degree of compression and deformity of the vertebral bodies of T11 and T12. (NOT THE BEST FILM TO DETERMINE HOW BADLY T11 AND T12 WERE DAMAGED)

    There are tiny bone densities which project along the posterior margin of the central canal at the T11 level. No apparent canal compomise. (YOU HAVE SOME SMALL AMOUNT OF BONE STICKING INTO YOUR SPINAL CANAL AT T-11).

    Impression: Apparent remote injury T11/T12 with exaggerated kyphosis at the thoracolumbar junction and anterior compression fractures and/or burst fracture T11/T12 suspect. Posterior decompression T11 as well as posterior fusion multiple levels identified.

    Findings: There is normal alignment. Vertebral bodies appear intact without acute fracture. No abnormal paraspinal soft tissue density.
    Impression: Negative CT upper thoracic spine imaging. (NORMAL POST INJURY FILM)

    (KLD)

  3. #3
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    CT Scan reply

    Can you tell from this CT result whether or not the spinal cord is intact? Would you have the bone fragment removed from the spinal canal? What next? Thanks....

  4. #4

    CT vs. MRI

    You cannot see soft tissue like the cord as well with a CT scan as you can with an MRI. You would need to have both studies to determine if you have any unresolved cord compression or impinging bone fragments that would warrent further surgery.

    I would also recommend getting at least 2 opinions prior to making any decision about further surgery. It sometimes works best to have these from two different disciplines...for example one a neurosurgeon who does a lot of spine surgery, and the other an orthopedist who specializes in spinal surgery.

    (KLD)

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