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Thread: Dietary glycine inhibits bladder activity in normal rats and rats with spinal cord injury.

  1. #1

    Dietary glycine inhibits bladder activity in normal rats and rats with spinal cord injury.

    There are two inhibitory neurotransmitters in the spinal cord: Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine. This very interesting study reports that when rats were fed on a standard diet or a diet with 1%-3% glycline, the glycine diet significantly reduced the intervals between bladder contractions and decreased the amplitude of bladder contractions in rats with spinal cord injury. This suggests that diet supplemented with glycine may be able to affect bladder spasticity in people with spinal cord injury.

    Miyazato M, Sugaya K, Nishijima S, Ashitomi K, Morozumi M and Ogawa Y (2005). Dietary glycine inhibits bladder activity in normal rats and rats with spinal cord injury. J Urol 173: 314-7. PURPOSE: The influence of dietary glycine on bladder activity, and on glutamate and glycine levels in the serum and lumbosacral cord was examined in rats with or without spinal cord injury (SCI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 84 female rats were divided into an intact and an SCI group. Each group of rats was divided into 7 subgroups. Two intact and 2 SCI subgroups were fed a standard diet and the remaining subgroups were fed diets containing 0.1% to 3% glycine. After 4 weeks isovolumetric cystometry was performed with rats under urethane anesthesia. Following cystometry glutamate and glycine levels in the serum and lumbosacral cord were measured as well as the glycine receptor alpha1 mRNA level in the lumbosacral cord. RESULTS: Dietary glycine (1% to 3%) prolonged the interval between bladder contractions in intact rats but did not change the amplitude of contractions. On the other hand, dietary glycine (1% to 3%) prolonged the interval and decreased the amplitude of bladder contractions in SCI rats. The glycine levels in the serum and lumbosacral cord of SCI rats on the standard diet were respectively 43% and 45% lower than those in intact rats on the standard diet. Dietary glycine (1% to 3%) increased the serum glycine level in intact and SCI rats but the glycine receptor alpha1 mRNA level in the lumbosacral cord was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary glycine crosses the blood-brain barrier and inhibits the micturition reflex pathway in the lumbosacral cord but SCI and/or dietary glycine do not influence glycine receptor expression. Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215, Japan.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Rick1's Avatar
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    What sort of dosing would be required to achieve the 1-3% (of diet) supplementation level?

  3. #3
    Rick, I am not sure. But it seems like a lot. Wise.

  4. #4
    Here's a site that lists the main food sources of glycine -

    glycine in food

    Wise, would you recommend a supplement for those folks who are vegetarians, since most of the food sources seem to be animal based?

    _____________
    What people say, what people do, and what they say they do are entirely different things. - Margaret Mead

  5. #5
    Marm, I find some of the recommended choices to be bizarre. Ostriches?

    It is interesting that most of the "herbal" sites on internet caution against using glycine as a supplement and it should always be done under the supervision of a doctor. On the other hand, other than the possibility of drug interactions, I was not able to find descriptions of glycine toxicity or any indication of toxic doses

    http://www.acupuncturetoday.com/herb...l/glycine.html

    The cost appears to be low. For example, 100 capsules of 1 gram glycine is less than $10. You can buy it in powder form for $16/pound.

    http://www.herbalglobal.com/Amino_Acids/Glycine.html

  6. #6
    Wise, I think the 'natural' sites give that precaution to pretty much everything they sell - gives 'em the 'out' they need.

    What - you've never had ostrich?

    _____________
    What people say, what people do, and what they say they do are entirely different things. - Margaret Mead

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