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Thread: Which way do you curve?

  1. #1
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    Which way do you curve?

    In which direction does your scoliosis curve? My spine heads off to the right. Also, my torso is torqued to the right, so, if you look at me from the side, the right side of my body is in front of the left side. I'm right-handed, if that has anything to do with it.

    It's difficult to sit comfortably, and to reach things. I'm sure I'm not the only quad with this problem.

  2. #2
    My upper left curve presses against my left shoulder blade, the lower right curve is at the high lumbar level. Because my chin is aligned with my pubic bone, I don't "look" scoliotic although a trained eye can tell because my left shoulder is higher than my right, my neck kind of slants towrds the right and my rib cage is rotated towards the left.

  3. #3
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    Before my last spine surgeries I had severe kyphosis, which made me resemble the hunchback of Notre Dame. I also had a lumbar lateral curve to the left. I lived with the curvature for many years and became an expert at hiding the deformity with clothing.

    How noticable are your curves? Hmm, that could be taken the wrong way!!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member crashgirl246's Avatar
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    Crooked little girl..

    i use to have a perfectly "straight" (ill never be straight..haha) spine. now it goes from the left then to the right. my right hip sticks out to the right, then my upper body leans towards the left.
    Could this be scolios? When i stand w/braces, im all crooked too???
    Im a Para too

  5. #5
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    It's noticeable. Not as bad as those examples you see on websites dealing with scoliosis, but definitely easily visible to the naked eye.

  6. #6

    How to tell if you have scoliosis

    A scoliosis is a lateral curve of the spine. A kyphosis is a forward curve (convex to the front) while a lordosis is a backward curve (convex to the back). The normal spinal column should have a slight lordosis. The Scoliosis Research Society defines a scoliosis as a lateral curvature of the spinal column that exceeds 10 degrees. In many people, scoliosis may be combined with kyphosis and this condition is called kyphoscoliosis. Lateral x-rays are necessary to determine kyphosis.

    http://www.choa.org/library/conditio...reatment.shtml

    A curvature of the spine in scoliosis is often hard to see (particularly if it is mild). The spine often compensates for a curvature in one place with a reverse curve in the opposite direction at another level, i.e. an S-shape.
    Therefore, if a person is sitting or standing up straight, you often cannot see a curvature. However, scoliosis of the thoracic vertebra is almost always associated with a rotation of the vertebral bodies. This can be seen as a rotation of the rib cage. So, most doctors will ask a person to bend at the waist until the thoracic spine is parallel to the ground. He/she will then look down the midline of the back and note whether the rib cage is elevated on one side versus the other. When the rib cage is visibly rotated, this is usually indicative of scoliosis.

    The definitive diagosis of scoliosis is of course made with an anterior-posterior x-ray of the spinal column. As many as 1 out of 750 people in the United States have scoliosis, i.e. 350,000 people. It is more prevalent in females, close to 2% of school girls may have scoliosis. However, if only scoliotic curves exceeding 30 degrees are counted, only 0.2% of the population have such scoliosis. Generally, surgical treatment is not recommended until the curve exceeds 30 degrees although bracing and other approaches are frequently employed to prevent progression of slight curvatures. For obvious reasons, it is not a good idea to screen all people with x-rays and therefore many attempts have been made to develop devices that can measure scoliosis without x-rays http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/903997272.html

    To measure the severity of scoliosis, doctors usually measure three aspects of the X-ray.
    1. Take the largest curve, find the top vertebral body and the bottom vertebral body of that curve, draw straight lines through the lateral processes of these bodies. Where the two lines intersect, measure the angle. This is called Cobb's angle.
    2. To assess rotation of vertebral bodies, the following approach is used on anterior-posterior x-rays. The posterior spinous process (the part that sticks out the back) should be in the center of the vertebral body and it is usually of a certain thickness. If the spinous process is one thickness away from the midline, this is called a +1 rotation. If it is 2, it is called as +2. Usually, a +3 rotation is considered severe, representing a 40-60 degree rotation of the vertebral body.
    3. Other tilts, rotations, or kyphosis of the spinal column and the sacrum should be noted and measured, if possible. In a person with spinal cord injury and who cannot stand, the x-ray must be taken in the person lying on their back and their feet aligned. Deviations of the sacrum, shoulder blades (scapula), etc. from the horizontal are measured.

    Wise.

  7. #7
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    Ha. That's interesting. My PT in inpatient told me that scoliosis wasn't a possible complication.

    Eric Texley

  8. #8
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    So we shouldn't be x-rayed in a seated position to check for scoliosis?

  9. #9
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    scoliosis

    People, scoliosis is something very usual to happen after a spinal injury, and without exercise it happen often. I think you should check if your chair is right for you, and also to try to seat in regular chair for some hours in a day if its possible, this are going to make your back to work a little more and the muscles in the trunk will get stronger dellaying the scloiosis to happen. Another good exercise is to try to seat without back rest. Also lean forward and try to get back from this position, this one you may need help, someone to be in front of you. In the begin you can help with the hands but try each day to have less and less help. I am sure this are going to help to have better ballance and stronger back.
    Chris.

  10. #10
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    The "lopsided" feeling is damn annoying, isn't it?

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