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Thread: My sister has been hit by a car......

  1. #1

    My sister has been hit by a car......

    On October 23rd, my sister was walking home from work and while standing on a corner to cross the street, she was struck, dragged and pinned under a car. Due to a two car collision and just the simple fact of being at the wrong place at the wrong time, my sister has been severely injured.

    After speaking with the doctors, her initial injuries were:

    A humerus fracture (Broken upper left arm)
    A completely mangled left leg
    and a broken neck (damaging her C4, C5 and C6 vertebrae)

    the doctors then gave us our new reality, my 41 year old sister, daughter, wife and mother of three will now be a quadriplegic.

    After initially trying to save her left leg, 6 days later the doctors came to the conclusion that it had to be amputated to avoid a infection taking over her entire body.

    A week later after attempting to realign her spine by used of a (correct me if I?m wrong) traction halo, they took her to surgery to stabilize and fuse her spine at that time the also gave her a tracheotomy. Even though she was breathing on her own when she was brought in the doctors said they didn?t want her to tire herself out so they put her on a vent.

    A month later my sister is healing well, and i am grateful for the baby steps she is taking towards recovery.

    Here's my question....Even though for this entire month my sister has been telling us that she can feel us touching her legs and arms; On November 22, my sister started to move what is left of her left leg. At first it was involuntarily while she was asleep. Then when she woke up, i asked her to do it again and voluntarily she slightly lifted her leg 4 times (and I caught it on camera)
    CAN SOMEONE PLEASE EXPLAIN HOW THIS IS POSSIBLE?? THE DOCTORS TOLD US THAT THIS WILL NEVER HAPPENED AGAIN. I AM EXTREMELY FAITHFUL AND I BELIEVE THIS IS A MIRACLE IN THE MAKING. CAN SOMEONE EXPLAIN IF THIS IS NORMAL OR NOT?

  2. #2
    Hi Makeda29,
    Sorry for the injury to your sister and that you find yourself here, but all the same Welcome.

    The first thing any newly injured person and her family need to know is that every injury is different and it is hard to predict just what kind of recovery may occur. Time will tell. Doctors can have an educated guess about what function will return, but it can take up to 1-2 years to know how much function will be regained. For now she needs to make the most out of her limited time in rehabilitation so she can function to her best ability.

    All the best to your sister and your family.
    GJ

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    I'm not going to speculate on your sister's specific injury. But I can tell you that it is possible for someone who will never walk again to still lift their legs. Many of us can do this by using our hip flexor muscles. That is still a good sign for someone with a C-level injury, but at this point it shouldn't be taken as a sign that her doctors are wrong or that a miracle is imminent. Both of you will need to be patient. As anyone here will tell you, each spinal cord injury is different. Some nerve pathways may survive.

  4. #4
    Where is your sister? Is she in the USA? Is she currently in a SCI specialty rehabilitation center? Does she have decent insurance? Is legal action being taken against the driver of the car?

    The responses above are correct. It is impossible to tell how complete the injury is initially. Most return occurs in the first 3 months post injury, but many continue to get slower (and smaller) return over the 2+ years post-injury. Right now it is critical that she get the best possible rehabilitation, and learn how to direct her care so that she remains as healthy as possible in spite of the injury.

    Is she still on the ventilator? If not, is her trach out? Have you asked about her actual ASIA score and AIS type of SCI (A, B, C, D, or E)??

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA
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    My first question also is, where is she? When you say her leg was mangled, what does that mean? Was it an open fracture that was contaminated at the scene?
    My son is a C-2 incomplete. So as not to be seen as an underachiever, he also crushed both legs (hamburger meat and cornflakes was how the trauma ortho described his legs), rupture his spleen, bruise both lungs and damage one kidney. The blood in the car confirmed that his legs were open fractures. We were told the day after that he would never anything, come off the vent, go home, have a life, anything and it would be best to take him off the vent and donate his organs. Nearly six years later, he is currently in his room, using his computer to whatever. He goes to school, eats what he wants, walks with a walker, but still also uses a power wheelchair.
    Every incomplete injury is different. The best thing you can do for her at this point, is to get her to a good SCI rehab facility as soon as possible. --eak
    Elizabeth A. Kephart, PHR
    mom/caregiver to Ryan-age 21
    Incomplete C-2 with TBI since 3/09

  6. #6
    Hi Makeda29,

    Sorry for your family's situation. Welcome to CC, it is a great place to learn more than what the doctors will tell you. As others have said - every injury/body is different. When my husband was first injured I wanted to know about others abilities with the same level of injury.

    As we were told in the beginning, it's a journey not a sprint. It's a slow process of healing. Attitude is huge in this process!! Stay positive for your sister. The first 6 months to a year were the hardest. Continue to tell her it won't always be this way, things do become easier.

    My husband was a pedestrian hit by a car, too. He was clipped at the legs: left was shattered below the knee and the right tib/fib was fractured, some damage at L2 and damage at C6/C7. I was told he was a quadplegic and would never feel anything below chest level. Soon after they bought him out of an induced coma he moved his right foot - slightly. The doctor told me it wasn't possible.

    He is a year and 8 months post injury and he has movement in both legs and arms. He is struggling with his right leg healing from the initial fracture but he can walk short distances with a walker.
    Our lives have changed drastically but we focus on the returns of function. There are things we can't do and there are things that we do differently. And everything takes a little longer to do.

    This is a great place for information and support. Wishing the best to your sister.

  7. #7
    It was a open fracture, and was very contaminated at the scene. all of her skin was gone, and after 4 debridements she was left with no more muscle just exposed bone a foot. But your son's story has given me so much hope!! May god continue to bless you. Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by ekephart View Post
    My first question also is, where is she? When you say her leg was mangled, what does that mean? Was it an open fracture that was contaminated at the scene?
    My son is a C-2 incomplete. So as not to be seen as an underachiever, he also crushed both legs (hamburger meat and cornflakes was how the trauma ortho described his legs), rupture his spleen, bruise both lungs and damage one kidney. The blood in the car confirmed that his legs were open fractures. We were told the day after that he would never anything, come off the vent, go home, have a life, anything and it would be best to take him off the vent and donate his organs. Nearly six years later, he is currently in his room, using his computer to whatever. He goes to school, eats what he wants, walks with a walker, but still also uses a power wheelchair.
    Every incomplete injury is different. The best thing you can do for her at this point, is to get her to a good SCI rehab facility as soon as possible. --eak

  8. #8
    Hi my sister is currently in the hospital ICU. The just closed her leg up by skin graft and she got her last surgery on her arm. Yes she is in the USA. We are working on getting her to a rehab center once she is a little more stable. Do you know of any really good ones in NYC. Yes she does have decent insurance, but that i sad if her insurance determines what kind of treatment she will get.

    I overheard the doctors talking and i did hear them say she is a B- ( i guess that mean a B closer to C). I never asked about a ASIA score. I will find out and get back to you.

    Thank you

  9. #9
    Here are some rehab centers in your area to interview:

    Burke Rehabilitation Center
    Tel: (914) 597-2500
    785 Mamoroneck Avenue
    White Plains, NY 10605
    URL:
    www.burke.org

    Burke Rehabilitation Center has brain and spinal cord injury inpatient and outpatient services that focus on helping the individual reach the maximum amount of independence. The multidisciplinary program is custom-tailored for each patient, and may include physical, occupational, respiratory, speech/language and recreation therapies, as well as counseling, social work, or other needed specialty services.

    At Burke, therapy takes place five or six days per week. Burke also offers a wide variety of education session designed for the patient’s family, so that they may better assist in the recovery process.

    Burke Rehabilitation Center is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), as well as the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).

    Helen Hayes Hospital Center for Rehabilitation Technology
    Tel: (888) 707-3422
    Address: Route 9W
    West Haverstraw, NY 10993
    URL:
    www.helenhayeshospital.org

    The Helen Hayes Hospital Center for Rehabilitation Technology provides physical rehabilitation for patients with both brain and spinal cord injury. The center’s focus is on using cutting-edge equipment and technology to restore as much function as possible to patients, allowing them to live active, productive, and independent lives.

    Every patient receives an individual plan that is developed by the physician and shared with the family and caregivers. Specialists that may be involved in the patient’s care include physical therapists, occupational therapists, respiratory therapists, speech pathologists, nurses, nutritionists, social workers, and prosthetists and orthotists.

    Helen Hayes Hospital Center also plays a major role in research, and is committed to contributing to the cures of the illnesses and injuries they deal with.

    Helen Hayes Hospital Center is operated by the New York State Department of Health and is affiliated with the New York Presbyterian Healthcare System. It is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), as well as the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).


    Mount Sinai Hospital

    Tel: (800) 637-4624
    Address: 1468 Madison Avenue
    New York, NY 10029
    URL:
    www.mountsinai.org

    Mount Sinai Hospital offers a residential program to patients with brain and spinal cord injury.

    The Brain Injury and Stroke Program accepts patients at all levels, from those who are in a coma to those who have higher levels of functioning. The Spinal Cord Injury Program accepts patients with all levels of injury. Using an interdisciplinary team, each patient program is individualized according to the patient’s needs.

    Mount Sinai Hospital is designated by the NIDRR as a Model System of Care for both Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury, and is the only Model System for both in New York State. It is also designated as a Research and Training Center.

    Mount Sinai Hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), as well as the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).


    Sunnyview Rehabilitation Hospital

    Tel: (518) 382-4500
    Address: 1270 Belmont Avenue
    Schenectady, NY 12308
    URL:
    www.sunnyview.org

    Sunnyview Rehabilitation Hospital is a 104-bed facility that serves brain and spinal cord-injured patients of all ages, at all levels of injury. Their motto, “enriching lives through greater independence,” sums up their commitment to help all patients live the most productive and functional lives possible.

    Using state-of-the-art equipment and technology, Sunnyview’s program comprises occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and hearing therapy, psychology, and counseling for both the patient and his or her family. Each patient’s program is designed to meet his or her unique needs. In addition, Sunnyview is supported by Ellis Hospital, St. Clare’s Hospital, and Albany Medical Center.

    Sunnyview Rehabilitation Hospital is consistently named one of the best rehabilitation facilities by U.S. News & World Report. It is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), as well as the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).


    Tricare Physical Therapy & Sports Rehab

    Tel: (914) 234-8800
    Address: 460 Old Post Rd, Suite 1C
    Bedford, NY 10506
    URL
    : www.tricarephysicaltherapy.com

    Tricare Physical Therapy is a leading edge facility in rehabilitation that offers outpatient physical therapy, training, and sports rehabilitation . We provide one on one care to our patients- a level of personal attention not found at most clinics. We do not use aides or assistants- your entire session will be with your therapist.
    We boast a treatment area of over 2,000 sq feet, including full gym, private treatment rooms, and state-of-the-art equipment. Tricare is dedicated to bringing you expert care in a professional setting- our clinic is located on the first floor, is handicap accessible, and has a free parking lot. All physical therapists are licensed and trained in the latest treatment and exercise techniques.
    Tricare is the only facility in Westchester offering the Optojump Next- a new technology developed by Microgate designed to provide objective data about the patient's physical abilities. Using the Optojump, everything from gait analysis to vertical leap test can be measured. In addition, a pre and post concussion screen can be administered, to help determine when an athlete is who has sustained a concussion is recovered.

    Outside of NY:

    Gaylord Hospital
    Tel: (203) 284-2810
    Address: Gaylord Farm Rd.
    P.O. Box 400
    Wallingford, CT 06492
    URL:
    www.gaylord.org

    Gaylord Hospital is a 109-bed facility that specializes in the care and treatment of both brain and spinal cord injury patients. The mission of Gaylord is to provide specialized care to each patient using an interdisciplinary team comprising physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech/language pathologists, psychologists, social workers, and other healthcare professionals.
    Gaylord has recently partnered with Boston Medical Center to become one of the country’s 14 Model Spinal Cord Injury System Centers.
    Gaylord Hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Services (JCAHO) as well as the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).


    Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation
    Tel: (201) 731-3600
    Address: 1199 Pleasant Valley Way
    West Orange, NJ 07052
    URL:
    www.kessler-rehab.com

    Consistently rated one of the best rehabilitation hospitals by U.S. News & World Report, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation is one of the few centers in the country to receive federal designation as a Model System for both spinal cord and brain injury treatment and research.
    Kessler’s Center for Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation provides an integrated program comprising medical, nursing, and therapy care, with each patient’s individual needs taken into consideration. Kessler has the ability to care for ventilator-dependent individuals, as well as individuals who have a concomitant brain injury.
    Kessler’s Center for Brain Injury Rehabilitation is designed to provide individual care for patients at every level of recovery, and is focused on helping patients gain independence, compensate for deficits, improve physical function and mobility, and overcome psychological and social problems that result from the injury.
    Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), as well as the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).

    All the best,
    GJ




  10. #10
    If sh's in nyc i would suggest she get into kessler in NJ it is much closer and they are much better at SCI REHAB
    T6 Incomplete due to a Spinal cord infarction July 2009

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