View Poll Results: How many people were "incomplete" shortly after injury are now walking?

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  • I am incomplete and walking (>1 year after injury)

    81 30.45%
  • I am incomplete and walking (≤1 year after injury)

    78 29.32%
  • I am incomplete but not walking (>1 year after injury)

    55 20.68%
  • I am incomplete but not walking (≤1 year after injury)

    46 17.29%
  • I had a "complete" spinal cord injury and recovered walking.

    6 2.26%
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Thread: How many people are "walking quads"?

  1. #11
    Member beelady's Avatar
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    I have seen the results of the poll and have given my answer. I am wondering what my sons chances of walking are though, even with those percents. I have been afraid to get the answer from his Dr. at TIRR so pray everyday for him to move something. He broke C7 but has very good if not perfect arm movement but alot of weakness in his right hand. He has always had feeling in his entire body since the day of the accident but it isnt normal but still seems to improve, very slowly. He knows when he needs to cath and has pressure before he does his bowel program, His legs sweat (but at that time he was wearing tedhose) He has been injured 5 1/2 months. Do those signs point to a good chance of recovery or is this more typical and we still have to wait and see? Thanks I forgot to mention that he has abs and back muscles, at least according to the biofeedback he was hooked up to yet he is very weak. He can do "girl" pushups very well, practically to where he is sitting back on his legs....but not quite.

    [This message was edited by beelady on 05-27-03 at 05:38 PM.]

  2. #12
    Senior Member dogger's Avatar
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    Beelady , i am not going to try to answer your question about your son walking . what i will say , is that he is gaining recovery well beyond his injury level and can possibly expect this to continue , most likely in ''fits and starts ''. i still see small returns at 12 years post . i would suggest you try the chat room , there are a number of incomplete quads who lurk around there at times , and may be able to answer some of your questions .

    thank you
    dogger

    every day i wake up is a good one .

  3. #13
    Member beelady's Avatar
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    Originally posted by dogger:

    Beelady , i am not going to try to answer your question about your son walking . what i will say , is that he is gaining recovery well beyond his injury level and can possibly expect this to continue , most likely in ''fits and starts ''. i still see small returns at 12 years post . i would suggest you try the chat room , there are a number of incomplete quads who lurk around there at times , and may be able to answer some of your questions .

    thank you
    dogger

    every day i wake up is a good one .
    What is fits and starts? That is one I have never heard of.

  4. #14
    There is some data on this from the Model Systems Centers. According to their most recently published book (that is now nearly 10 years old), from 1972-1992, with over 5,000 cases included:

    For those admitted ASIA A, 88.8% remained ASIA A at discharge from rehab, 5.0% were ASIA B, 2.9% were ASIA C, 2.8% ASIA D, and 0% ASIA D.

    Fot those admitted ASIA B, 4.9% were ASIA A at discharge (worse), 48.9% remained ASIA B, 15.6% were ASIA C, 27.6% were ASIA D, and 0.7% were ASIA E.

    For those admitted ASIA C, 1.9% were ASIA A (worse), 0.8% were ASIA B (worse), 41.4% ASIA C, 53.3% ASIA C, and 1.3% ASIA E.

    For those admitted ASIA D, 0.5% were ASIA A at discharge (worse), 0.5% were ASIA B (worse), 0.8% were ASIA C (worse), 90.3% were ASIA D, and 6.5% were ASIA E.

    This does not specifically address ambulation, but most people who are ASIA Ds ambulate at least part time, although sometimes requiring assistance. We also know that that now days MOST people with SCI are incomplete at the time of admission to rehab (ASIA B-D).

    (KLD)

  5. #15
    Senior Member dogger's Avatar
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    Beelady , ''fits and starts '' = at intermittent times into the future , is probably the best i can think of offhand .i hope this expains , it must be an Aussie expression .

    thank you
    dogger

    every day i wake up is a good one .

  6. #16
    Beelady
    Hi...I'm 20/f. December 25, 2002 I was in a roll-over which resulted in a c6/c7 incomplete sci. I saw your post, it was eerie, felt like I was reading about myself almost. I have almost normal arm movement. My main prob is I don't have full finger extension in my right fingers. I also have sensation since the beginning and motor return to t-12 maybe L-1. No leg movement yet ...but I will!!! Anyways if you wanna talk let me know. Like I said, me and your son sound verrry similar....
    Thanx
    november

  7. #17
    Junior Member
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    Charlotte, NC, USA
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    Wise (and all),

    I surf this site alot but J, my paraplegic T5 complete ASIA - A buddy is too busy to come very often. If I could vote for him -- he is walking with RGO braces and walker - and he is now 4 years post injury.. learned to walk 3 months ago so it IS possible..

    Presbynurse

  8. #18
    Thanks, PresbyNurse.

    There is also the question of what methylprednisolone does for people who are incomplete. According to the clinical trials, people who were incomplete at the time of admission and receive methylprednisolone within 8 hours recover approximately 75% of the motor function that they had lost. Most of the Model System Data were collected before the methylprednisolone was being routinely given to people with spinal cord injury. Wise.

  9. #19

    Walked Quickly, Now Losing Function

    I have an incomplete C5-C6 with central cord syndrome and Brown-Sequard syndromes. I also have a small cyst in my cord at approximately C-6 which was originally a hematoma. I was told I would walk but that it would take months. I walked in a month-and-a-half. In the past two years I did three short triathlons. Last year was a struggle and I eventually had to stop training. I developed feelings in my arms like I was being bitten by fire ants whenever I was in the sun on a hot day. I started having issues with overheating. In the end, whenever I would work out in heat I would end up very sick and in extreme pain from my face down. It is winter now and is a blessing. My neurologist has told me that everything I described was due to aging with my SCI. He let me know that my mobility would decrease over time. I don't know if he is right. No one in Austin seems to know what to do with me. It would be ironic if I ended up in a chair after walking for so long.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Broknwing's Avatar
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    Kitty-
    you need to see a new neurosurgeon ASAP! anytime you've got a
    decrease in function that is NOT normal & is typically a sign of a syrinx. It sounds as if you've already been diagnosed with a syrinx but your dr is not treating it. I know there are others here more familiar w/TX and where you might want to go, but my firs guess would be to contact TIRR and see if they can recommend someone.
    'Chelle
    L-1 inc 11/24/03

    "My Give-a-Damn's Busted"......

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