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Thread: Welcome to the Acute SCI Forum

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Newsjunkie
    Hi all
    My brother in law sustained a c4-c5 injury at the end of January. He has made great progress and came out of ICU after about five weeks, trach removed and now breathing fine on his own. He has weak movement in his left arm at the moment and none in his right but we hope the physio and occupational therapy will help him to build strength and regain some function. We are based in Ireland and have been over and back a few times. We saw him out in a wheelchair for the first time last weekend and it was great to see him upright although it seems to be uncomfortable for his back.
    This is a fantastic forum with brilliant support and I am hoping to be able to pass the ideas and hope back to my brother-in-law.
    I answered in http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...559#post818559

  2. #42

    New SCI from Hong Kong

    Hi Dr. Wise,

    I am very pleased to be able to seek information from this channel at this helpless moment. My 29-year-old sister got a car accident while travelling Scotland on March 24th. She was severe injured and was just out of ICU few days ago. Doctor says that she gets spinal cord fracture in C4-C5 and broken spinal cord from C6-C7. She has undergone several operations for internal bleeding, broken leg, chest ribs and neck since then. And she will has another one for her front neck so as to allow herself to sit up as soon as possible. However, doctor here says given today's medical resouces / technologies now, my sister will not be able to walk again. My parents, sisters and my sister's friends who have flown to Scotland from Hong Kong after the accident, were shattered apart after hearing the bad news.
    Dr. Wise, could you please advise how we can do next? Is my sister really hopeless even in the future according to what doctor said? We understand that my sister can't leave Scotland until she has no problem breathing her own. And our plan is seeking doctors in China and Hong Kong, actually wherever are possible for treatment. Is there any doctor who has started stem cell transplant in Asia?
    Thanks for your taking time for us.

    Candy Kwok
    email: candy.kwok@pmp.com.hk

  3. #43
    Hi everyone! It's been a long time since I've been on this board...over 2 years as a matter of fact. I was browsing on the web tonight and came across this site. It was like going back in time for me, beyond two years ago to a time where I was so uncertain about my future as a quad (or tetra for you 'pc' folks!).

    I decided to check it out again and read this post of the man who was told by his doctors that this was it, no more recovery, yadda, yadda, blah, blah, etc., etc., etc...

    I had initially found Dr. Wise on the web so many years ago, when my fear of what the future held was nearly overwhelming...like so many of us, I was a very physically fit woman, strong and independent. 11+ years ago, I suffered a sci that changed my world, and as a c6-7, I became completely dependent on others for my most basic needs. What a trip that was, and I suffered from humiliation, rage, extreme vulnerability, depression at times, but it was all overshadowed by FEAR! My family shielded me from the worst news, and I later learned that the barriers posed could have been so great that the nursing home option HAD been tossed out there for consideration. My family became my shield, as I said, protecting my vulnerable mental state, which allowed me time to absorb all the stuff swirling around me, the doctor's diagnosis, and more importantly, the prognosis! I heard the same crap (pardon the slang but that's what it was!), and was even told that I better start dealing with reality and understand that I was never going to move from the neck down; that this was it...once I stopped crying, I got ticked and then became determined to not allow those words to define me or my abilities.

    So my long-winded reply to your post is to please tell your brother in law:
    Do not allow others to tell you what you will become, what you will achieve...be your own advocate, your own champion! I'm not saying that you will succeed in your journey to a recovery or that you will or will not walk again. I am simply stating that if you want to try, try!

    Newly injured folks are bombarded with all kinds of medical info, and learn that there is this whole community that makes you feel like a visitor to a strange land...it will take time to get a handle on this, but you will. You will become acutely tuned in to you, and after awhile, talking about you will bore you! Yet, you must become knowledgeable, you must tap into the hope that you can regain function and just simply try. It will take time and is trial and error. It's hard, no doubt, but so worth it! Acceptance of the status quo in sci's leaves one stagnant, and that is a terrible fate. I'd rather go out swinging, you know?

    Dr. Wise, about 9 years ago, I had emailed you about recovering function and using exercise/repetitive motion. Your reply gave me the green light that I had been searching for and I found it very motivational. To paraphrase, you told me that the two year window of recovery was not definite, that all sci's were unique and that exercising and using repetitive motion had been successful in returning function in lab studies using rats. You did not dampen my hope like all the other professionals, and I am grateful to you for that.

    While I may not be walking (yet!), I have made so many gains physically and mentally that the w/c is no longer an albatross...I don't seek out sci websites exclusively or anything like that. I work and live like everyone else, and every once in awhile, I come back and visit, occasionally throwing my two cents in.

    To all newly acquired sci's, hang in there and just keep moving forward. Your mind will catch up with your new reality and you will be ok if you fortify it with positive, healthy thoughts.

    One last thing...if you do not agree with a professional, a doctor, a therapist, an orthotic (sp?) dude, and even your w/c and seating person, speak up! I learned the hard way to say NO, and it cost me two surgeries and lots of bedrest about 6 years ago. I wish someone had told me it was ok to question/disagree with them if I felt they were wrong...they were as it turned out.

  4. #44
    Hello everyone!!!,I'm new around here as my close friend has been recently shot in the neck by accident w/a 40 caliber,his c4 and c5 have compression fractures and he has been paralyized below the shoulders since the accident about 5 1/2 weeks ago.he's in a nursing facility and is not getting the proper SCI rehab IMO,basically NONE!!!!,What can I do ??????he has parents and they seem overwlemed and don't know what to do(they're the ones who chose to put him where he is now)I gave them a bunch of info from the reeves foundation and there not being very proactive IMO,anyone have any suggestions where to start he has no insurance~thanks abunch~Paul

  5. #45
    Paul, you should probably continue to post on your previous thread as it will get more attention.

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=121578

    (KLD)

  6. #46

    Namaste

    Praise to you for being there to help us sitting in the dark and hoping, praying for some light. My 24 y/o nephew very recently suffered a C2 complete injury and is now vent dependent and my sister (his mom) and her husband and family are more than overwhelmed. They are so on their own and I am TRYING to help, but don't know how? He was discharged from ICU in Ventura (very caring wonderful staff in there) to a supposedly great rehab center near LA. But that center is filled with attitudes of gloom for him and insist that my sis and b-i-law take him home in their car!!!! She took all their classes, which they claim she passed and should be ready to care for him at home. This is an absolute impossibility with no way to get him there, no bed, no VENT, no wheelchair, no doctor, no home health aides, etc. She has had to stop working to be down there round the clock and wants to care for him; they're just nowhere near ready or able. The accident happened two months ago. Does anyone have any advice for how long it takes for someone to be able to come home? And how to set that all up? The current hospital provides NO discharge plan, no assitance in finding a medical team or home equipment or anything. Thankfully he has been equipped (by the kindness of a stranger) with a computer and a puffer-mouse and is already online! But this current hospital is supposed to be a rehab center yet they refuse to give him any kind of physical therapy because he is a 'C2 complete'. Does anyone have any advice? I'll be heading home soon (Seattle) but I can continue trying to find help long distance, or else connect her to this site. And actually, my nephew can join here if this would be a good place for him to communicate. thanks again for all everyone does here and I look forward to hearing from some of you soon.
    My prayers are with you all.
    - Mary

  7. #47
    What is this "great" rehab center?? Does not sound very great to me. Doesn't sound like Rancho Los Amigos, which would be my first choice in So. Cal. Craig in Denver or Santa Clara Valley in San Jose would have been better. Is he uninsured??

    The average rehab hospitalization for someone with a cervical injury, even ventilator dependent, is 6-8 weeks now days.

    (KLD)

  8. #48

    Brown Sequard Syndrome

    Dear SCI Nurse,

    Do you have any information about Brown Sequard Syndrome?? Prognosis? Forums? Success rates ??

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