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Thread: Zhang, et al. (2002). Changes of intracellular calcium and the correlation with functional damage of the spinal cord after spinal cord injury.

  1. #1

    Zhang, et al. (2002). Changes of intracellular calcium and the correlation with functional damage of the spinal cord after spinal cord injury.

    • Zhang Y, Hou S and Wu Y (2002). Changes of intracellular calcium and the correlation with functional damage of the spinal cord after spinal cord injury. Chin J Traumatol 5:40-2. Summary: OBJECTIVE: To observe dynamic changes of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) after spinal cord injury, and to study the relationship between the changes of [Ca(2+)]i and the functional damage of the spinal cord. METHODS: The rats were subjected to a spinal cord contusion by using a modified Allen's method. The [Ca(2+)]i in the injured segment of the spinal cord was measured by the technique of La(3+) blockage and atomic absorption spectroscopy at 1, 4, 8, 24, 72, and 168 hours after injury. The motor function on the inclined plane was measured at the same time. RESULTS: The spinal cord [Ca(2+)]i increased significantly (P<0.05 or P<0.01) aft er spinal cord injury. There was a significant correlation [P<0.05) between the changes of [Ca[2+)]i and the motor function. CONCLUSIONS: [Ca[2+)]i overload may play an important role in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Department of Orthopedics, 304th Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100037, China. yadong@public3.bta.net.cn

  2. #2

    Info on Pulsed Electromagnet Fields Altering Calcium in SCI

    A question for Dr. Wise Young:

    Some information was sent to me regarding a treatment called PEMF, which I know and have heard very little about. The document was dated September 15, 1985 and was sent to me via email by a person who is writing an article on SCI, "Care versus Cure". The letter was concerning functional recovery studies that were carried out on PEMF (Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields)in the early 80's. The report stated that at 4 hours after injury the percentage of cats receiving PEMF that recovered walking at 4 months after spinal cord injury was 78% (7/9), compared to 0% of the sham-treated controls(that did not receive PEMF). The letter stated that no pharmacological treatment including naloxone and methylprednisolone had up to that time exhibited that degree of effectiveness in similar animal studies. Can you tell me what happened with this treatment?
    Thanks...

  3. #3
    Redneck, I am not sure where you saw this "article" but it seems to have been an initial report that I may have written for the company called Diapulse, in support of their effort to get FDA approval for their device. It was an initial study that we had carried out but we were unable to replicate the results and I therefore never published the results. Wise.

  4. #4

    FDA approval of PEMF for SCI

    After a brief search, I found the report and yes, it
    was written by you,Dr. Young. One place it can be viewed
    at is www.racingsmarter.com/spinal_cord_injury.htm
    Further info can be found at www.racingsmarter.com/diapulse'sbiologicaleffects.htm
    I don't understand why this avenue of treatment was
    dropped/abandoned. However, since it's not a drug,
    it would not be likely to have a great deal of investors
    or funding for further research, and the FDA would not
    have had the incentive/pressure to approve it for the
    treatment of spinal cord injuries. I found other interesting
    articles on the subject...www.em-probe.com/message.html
    www.papimi.com/bioenergy/ppt/PAPIMIpresentation/tsld005.htm

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