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Thread: 25-year longitudinal study of aging after spinal cord injury

  1. #1

    25-year longitudinal study of aging after spinal cord injury

    Well, it seems that some things get better and some things get worse with time after injury. Adjustment, satisfaction with finance, eduction, and employment imporved. On the other hand satisfaction with sex, health, number of visitors, and health declined. Not much of a surprise.

    Krause JS and Broderick L (2005). A 25-year longitudinal study of the natural course of aging after spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord STUDY DESIGN:: Longitudinal; Survey. OBJECTIVE:: The purpose of this study was to investigate the natural course of changes in activity patterns, health indicators, life satisfaction, and adjustment over 25-year period among people with spinal cord injury (SCI) in the USA. SETTING:: The preliminary data were collected from a Midwestern United States university hospital of the USA, whereas the follow-up data were collected at a large Southeastern United States rehabilitation hospital. METHOD:: The Life Situation Questionnaire was used to identify changes in education/employment, activities, medical treatments, adjustment, and life satisfaction. RESULTS:: Adjustment scores, satisfaction with employment, satisfaction with finances, years of education, and employment indicators significantly improved over time. In contrast, satisfaction with sex life, satisfaction with health, and then number of weekly visitors significantly decreased and the number of nonroutine medical visits and days hospitalized within 2 years prior to the study significantly increased over the 25-year period. CONCLUSION:: Given the mixed pattern of favorable and unfavorable changes, the findings challenge the assumption that aging will inevitably be associated with the overall decline in outcomes and quality of life. SPONSORSHIP:: This research was supported by field initiated grants from the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services (#H133G970111 & H133G010009).Spinal Cord advance online publication, 15 February 2005; doi:10.1038/sj.sc.3101726. 1Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15711611

  2. #2
    Isn't this fairly across the board with aging in general?

    I mean even the AB's bitch about their aches and pains..and regret no longer being physically able to enjoy wild monkey sex.

    AND do alot of grotesque elective surgeries to try and stop the march of time across their face and bodies.

    They have done way too many studies on the personality traits of the disabled..this money should be and have been spent on the study of the paralysis instead of the person.
    JMHO

  3. #3
    Originally posted by Lindox:

    Isn't this fairly across the board with aging in general?

    I mean even the AB's bitch about their aches and pains..and regret no longer being physically able to enjoy wild monkey sex.

    AND do alot of grotesque elective surgeries to try and stop the march of time across their face and bodies.

    They have done way too many studies on the personality traits of the disabled..this money should be and have been spent on the study of the paralysis instead of the person.
    JMHO
    Yep, gotta agree with this opinion Lindox! My general complaints about life have to do with aging in general and not really about the stuff having to do with SCI in general, although my status as an SCI is in question, I only have a few discs that are "fried".

    Let's do a comparison of SCI vs. non-SCI in this particular study and I think we'll find it pretty much evens out simply because we're aging at this point, as much as we'd like not to be, well, that's just life .

    Jewel

  4. #4
    Tell me something I don't already know.

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