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Thread: Revealing The Covenant by Rusty Van Reeves...."What could be a more timely topic?"

  1. #1
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    Revealing The Covenant by Rusty Van Reeves...."What could be a more timely topic?"

    http://www.geocities.com/rustyvanreeves/review6b.html

    Author Rusty Van Reeves refers to Revealing The Covenant as a "medical thriller." Well it's true, though better terminology might have been "international business espionage thriller." Maybe that's too long, but such a description is apt.

    "'A lab in Mississippi, of all places...recently stumbled upon a cure for paralysis. From the reports I'm getting, they've successfully performed their little operation on a patient in a clinic in Europe. A rather simple operation using embryonic stem cells grown across a bridge of tissue.'" What could be a more timely topic? "The men looked at each other thoughtfully. Finally, Dr. Probst asked, 'Have they started their clinical trials yet here in the states?'"

    "With Dr. Kilmer's new operation and drug, the Club now had a foot in the door. Their continued DNA research at Rolan Oak, and their other discoveries still in the pipeline, placed them on the threshold of becoming a major force in the biotechnological revolution. That fact was not lost on the Consortium." The author's detailed explanation of the players and their behavior in his primeval plot makes for a splendid read. This is heightened by Reeves's personal experience. He is a person whose lifestyle could be enhanced were his fiction truth.

    Reeves energetically engages his rambunctious characters in air travel among Los Angeles, Munich, New York City, Jackson, MS, Myrtle Beach and Hilton Head. Multiple sub-plots develop, some marred by plunder, murder and deathly acts of God, some intriguingly adventurous, with a gentle blush of "boy meets girl." He precisely defines his characters through generous color and circumstance, leaving little to one's imagination. They each are easily recognized at every juncture as they appear.

    In Los Angeles neurosurgeon Dr. Michael Preston's professional and personal life was thrust into overdrive with a voice mail, "Dr. Preston, this is Simon Coker. I'm an attorney representing Stergis Braxton. I'll be arriving in Los Angeles tomorrow and would like very much to set up a meeting at your earliest convenience. I know this is short notice, but...It concerns embryonic stem cells and a cure for paralysis. Call me collect (601) 678-6789." Notice that area code.

    Michael Preston had been driver of the car in an accident that resulted in the paralysis of his younger brother Matt. Both young men's lives were dramatically altered. Michael chronically re-visits the scene, over and over. The surgeon would be charmed, drawn, into a different life tainted by espionage and deaths, toward the grail of paralysis reversal. From all such he would relish only brief respites.

    Author Reeves treats readers to a healthy dose of historical and experimental history. "Why can a lizard regenerate and "regrow" its tail? What properties in its DNA allow it to do this? With that we began an intensive study of lizards. Lizards probably arose from early eosuchian reptiles, which lived during the lower Triassic Period, about 220 million years ago. The inner lining of the human nose...has similar regenerative properties. We call the inner lining the olfactory mucosa." The "Club" partnership had set up a satellite laboratory in Switzerland to conduct surgery on animals and humans, "where the medical laws are much more lenient. The Republicans, the Catholic Church and the Right-to-life groups in this country don't appreciate our work with stem cells." The Club is an informal name attached to that group of partners who authorize and support the research projects. Its treacherous adversary, "the Consortium," a wealthy group of thuggish evildoers whose front is a moss-backed chain of HMOs, has only ill will for cures of any kind. Both of them are in a second generation. "The Consortium spent millions trying to shift the nation's focus from national health care reform to Whitewater. The Consortium proved it could play hardball, even with the White House."

    Reeves's plush talents still evolving, get a true workout before his readers' eyes. Characterization is one of the writer's long suits. Each time Chan and Nigel appear, conditioned readers will cringe at the mention of their names. In a faraway scene, "Lucky smoked a cigarette. Nigel sharpened his bayonet on sandstone. Off by himself, Chan sat meditating. The men had no way of knowing that age and a sense of his own mortality had rubbed the Major's rough edges smooth. Though he was still a war dog, his adrenaline no longer blinded him to the potential danger." Another is scientist Dr. Hans Kilmer's daughter, who, "held herself gracefully poised there in the moonlight." When Preston met Kayla her, "dark eyes examined him with a cunning that at first made him self-conscious, but then aroused him. Her eyes were like black pearls mounted on fine ivory as the light sparkled within them. She tossed her beautiful chestnut hair back over her shoulder as she nervously greeted him."

    Occasionally the author slides well-placed yet camouflaged clues into the thick plot. Recognizing this will remind a reader to question if he or she is observing an actual picture or being purposely thrown off.

    Rusty Van Reeves's Revealing The Covenant is a story of malevolence that captures the reader. If the book has a downside, it could be that a swirl of colorful characters, each one worth his or her own story, and the clever incidents, leave little time to savor interesting detail or circumstance. And too, within the detail, more foliage and more prelude leading to circumstance, would be enhancing. Nonetheless, it is clear the author knows of what and of whom he writes in his "medical thriller."



    Review of Revealing the Covenant
    Reviewed February 11, 2005 by,
    --Thurman Boykin for In the Shadow of Pulitzers

    ~ People acting together as a group can accomplish things which no individual acting alone could ever hope to bring about. - Franklin D. Roosevelt ~

    [This message was edited by Faye on 02-13-05 at 12:49 PM.]

  2. #2
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    Great book Rusty!!!!

    I read it over a year ago in Nov. 2003, while Jason attended an intensive therapy program in Anaheim CA
    I couldn't stop reading it....always anxious to find out what was going to happen next...

    Thank you for bringing this issue to the public, in an extra-ordinary book.

    Faye

    ~ People acting together as a group can accomplish things which no individual acting alone could ever hope to bring about. - Franklin D. Roosevelt ~

  3. #3
    I think I need to read this book!
    I didn't realize Rusty is a CareCure member

  4. #4
    i plan on reading this book, haven't gotten around to it yet since it came out...looks really good though...

  5. #5
    Thank you for posting the review.

    "We can all be angels to one another. We can choose to obey the still small stirring within, the little whisper that says, 'Go. Ask. Reach out. Be an answer to someone's plea. You have a part to play. Have faith.' We can decide to risk that He is indeed there, watching, caring, cherishing us as we love and accept love. The world will be a better place for it. And wherever they are, the angels will dance."
    -- Joan Wester Anderson- American writer, author

  6. #6
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    How about some more CC reviews?

    ~ People acting together as a group can accomplish things which no individual acting alone could ever hope to bring about. - Franklin D. Roosevelt ~ www.CureParalysisNow.org

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