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Thread: Eastwood Continues Disability Vendetta with 'Million Dollar Baby'

  1. #11
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    In my opinion -with all this controversy & publicity it all works to our advantage



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  2. #12
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Eastwood ripped over film's plot twist

    Eastwood ripped over film's plot twist


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    By United Press International
    Sunday, January 23, 2005


    Clint Eastwood is taking a few jabs for his latest award-winning film, "Million Dollar Baby," which was released in the United States this month.

    The Warner Bros. drama about a female boxer who asks an aging trainer to help her become a champion takes an unexpected turn when a leading character becomes disabled in a serious accident and wants to be put to death.

    Detractors say the studio, Eastwood and critics conceal a grim ending to promote euthanasia, the Sunday Telegraph reports.

    "Warner Brothers never tells you the truth
    http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-.../s_296072.html



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  3. #13
    A number of religious right-to-life groups are also upset because Eastwood's character is a Roman Catholic who attends Mass every day.
    Well, so am I, and I can tell you, you just don't find Catholics who go to Mass every day who are pro-euthanasia. That's just ridiculous. And you won't find Orthodox Jews or Muslims who eat pork at lunch, either. I mean, it just DOESN'T WORK THAT WAY...

    I find the whole concept as anti-Catholic as I find it anti-gimp, but then I admit the bias, in both directions.

    Agree, Max, this has been a good way to get the message out.

    Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.-- Søren Kierkegaard

  4. #14
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Million Dollar Baby Draws Flak from Spinal Injury Groups
    By James Wray
    Jan 23, 2005, 22:28 GMT



    Clint Eastwood's boxing drama "Million Dollar Baby" is under attack from The National Spinal Cord Injury Association.

    The award-winning movie, which is tipped for some Oscar gongs, follows a veteran fighter who works with a dedicated woman, training her as she attempts to establish herself as a boxer. Eastwood directed and stars in the movie along with Morgan Freeman and Hilary Swank.

    The part of the movie drawing flak is towards the end when one character suffers a spinal injury and pleads to be allowed to die.

    The association says this last scene is a "brilliantly executed attack on life after a spinal cord injury."

    Eastwood himself has kept pretty quiet on the matter and Warner Bros. has certainly not highlighted this part of the movie.

    The veteran actor said he was not pro-euthanasia and the movie just reflected some of the dilemmas people face in real life.

    You can find out more about "Million Dollar Baby" and read a review in our database.

    Million Dollar Baby Draws Flack from NSCIA

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    edited to fix URL/resize page

    [This message was edited by cheesecake on 02-01-05 at 07:47 AM.]

  5. #15
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Censure for Eastwood's euthanasia film

    Censure for Eastwood's euthanasia film

    Staff and agencies
    Wednesday January 26, 2005

    Clint Eastwood's Oscar-nominated film Million Dollar Baby has come under attack from far right and disabled groups in the US for its treatment of euthanasia.
    The boxing drama, which has seven nominations and for which Eastwood has already picked up the Golden Globe for best director, along with best actress for Hilary Swank, shows its leading character begging to be put to death after becoming crippled in a serious accident.

    Conservative television commentator Debbie Schlussel has described the movie as a "million dollar lie". She said it was a "cover story to suck moviegoers in for a nefarious message which supported killing the handicapped, literally putting their lights out."

    America's National Spinal Cord Injury Association accused Eastwood of a "disability vendetta". A spokesman labelled the film's final scene "a brilliantly executed attack on life after a spinal cord injury."

    Eastwood himself is nominated for best actor and best director for the film, which is based on a short story by the former fight manager and cutman Jerry Boyd, writing under the pen-name FX Toole. The veteran actor also took on producer's duties.


    http://film.guardian.co.uk/news/stor...399040,00.html



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  6. #16
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    Originally posted by fuentejps:

    nothingwrong w/ that. he helped die, i hope if the time ever comes and i cant do it myself, someone i luv helps me go.

    Don't worry fjps, I get the impression you wont have any trouble finding someone to help.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Mercy me

    Mercy me


    By Scott Galupo
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES


    "For the last seven years, I have not been able to eat, wash, go to the bathroom or get dressed by myself," said Christopher Reeve in dramatic testimony before the Senate in 2002. "Some people are able to accept living with a severe disability. I am not one of them..."
    Stop after that ellipsis, and you might read a validation of the pro-euthanasia ethos embodied - perhaps even espoused - in two critically acclaimed films both nominated for Academy Awards on Tuesday.

    http://washingtontimes.com/entertain...5159-3121r.htm



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  8. #18
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    “Piss on Pity�

    "Piss on Pity"
    Clint Eastwood's "Million Dollar" Snuff Film
    by Mickey Z.
    www.dissidentvoice.org
    January 24, 2005






    Fresh off some big Golden Globes wins, "Million Dollar Baby" seems poised for Oscar success...but not everyone is pleased with the boxing flick-cum-snuff film. If you haven't already seen the movie, be warned: The surprise ending is revealed in the next paragraph.

    Hilary Swank goes from trailer trash to number one contender in the first two-thirds of the film. Her relationship with her trainer (Eastwood) and her drive to succeed makes this part of the film enjoyable for anyone who happens to like boxing parables (as I do). Then it all changes. Swank gets her title shot and ends up paralyzed. After a long, horribly drawn-out series of hospital scenes, she convinces Clint (star, director, producer, and he even wrote the damn score) to disconnect her breathing tube. Clint, of course, obliges.

    "This movie is a corny, melodramatic assault on people with disabilities," writes Steve Drake in The Ragged Edge. "It plays out killing as a romantic fantasy and gives emotional life to the 'better dead than disabled' mindset lurking in the heart of the typical (read: non-disabled) audience member."

    It will likely come as a bit of shock to those unfamiliar with the disability rights movement, but not every disabled person would rather be dead (or even non-disabled). Dead people, you see, can't fight the power and raise hell. Thanks to activists from Lizzie Jennings to Rosa Parks, African-Americans can not only get on the bus, they can sit anywhere they damn please. "Folks with disabilities," says Lucy Gwin, founder and editor of Mouth Magazine, "still can't get on the bus."

    And here's a newsflash to those who think Christopher Reeve represented the disability rights movement: The crips weren't impressed with Superman's search for a cure -- in fact, they're not pacified by Jerry Lewis' telethons or legislature that honored more in the breech, and they want freedom for the two million Americans imprisoned in nursing homes against their will. Now. Those are among the many reasons Gwin started Mouth and, as she puts it, "lowered the level of discourse on the subject of the helping system." As the crip mantra goes: "Nothing about us, without us."


    http://www.dissidentvoice.org/Jan05/MickeyZ0124.htm



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  9. #19
    Someone sent me some blog entries on this, that are pretty good.

    (NDY is NOT DEAD YET)

    Now that the issue of spoilers has been done to death, I think I'll throw in a few comments about what a crap movie Million Dollar Baby is.

    Basically, it's the "Wallace Beery wrestling picture" that Barton Fink never got around to writing. Part of the reason for Eastwood's ridiculous and vile depiction of quadraplegia is that he's making a 1930s movie. He gets love from the critics for throwing in two "twists": the boxer's a woman, and Eastwood dares to be dark and kills her in the end.

    Let me point out a couple major points that Eastwood invents for this movie. First, it's been settled that people on ventilators have the right to demand the machine be switched off; we all have the right to refuse medical care. Second, bedsores are not exactly unknown to modern nursing. I imagine there are places where someone might end up losing a limb due to neglected bedsores within a few months of becoming paralyzed, but I'd say that doesn't speak well of Frankie's paternal care.

    Obviously enough Eastwood has artistic license to tell his own story, but there is a point to the changes he makes to reality, just as there is a point to the story he's telling: disabled lives are not worth living.

    Of course, you can tell me that that's not the point of the story - the important thing is the (creepy) fatherly relationship between Frankie and Maggie. That's what really pisses me off. Endorsing the death of disabled people isn't a point to be made for this movie - it's a cliche to be exploited, something that the movie simply takes for granted as true.

    FYI, I was actually at that little Chicago protest. It was a fun little event - very meta. Protesting film critics for praising a movie. It is a silly idea, but, of course, it worked; it got attention. Nothing the media like like a media story.

    Posted by Brian Zimmerman · January 25, 2005 03:43 AM
    we see eastwood creating a character that begs to be killed once she becomes a quadriplegic. i am asking the question about why eastwood made a film where a quadriplegic is killed, about a man that kills a disabled woman. the entire film eastwood constructs is brimming over with the belittling of women: "i don't train girls" (note, he calls women "girls", that maggie is the titular "baby", i suppose both because she is a she and because she becomes a quad); "you punch like a girl"; the issue of frankie's "daughter" - are we to believe that she is a fiction of the fiction? is it merely a plot device so that we see frankie recieving letters "from his daughter," through himself, of course, but in light of the daughter role that maggie takes on, that say "return to sender" - obviously telegraphing that maggie should be "returned to sender" thus frankie's arrival at the killing, out of the light, into the foregrounded darkness into maggie's room, and back into the light. here we see disability played to emphasize the devalued female.

    the film's other disabled character, danger barch, why "danger"? clearly it is meant to be ironic, he is only dangerous in the sense of a cautionary about "letting disabled folks live"; i could go into the "savings" that eastwood's frankie espouses every 15minutes, to emphasize the construction of "social dead weight", but you get it. danger is played for laughs, and a bit of sympathy. laughs because he is disabled, his sympathy through his maleness. so not only are disabled characters used by eastwood for their associations with "weakness" and "unworthy life" but also to refiy male privilege.

    i don't disagree with realish that this is a story, well acted and directed, but choices were made about which story to tell. had eastwood made a film valorizing a different "white trash" character, perhaps a member of the kkk, with certain moral conflicts, but killing a black person in the ring, i imagine the film would easily be read as racist - though it would still be "about indivdiuals, individual relationships, and individual choices."

    still, i can hardly believe that the film would have us believe that yeats wrote in gaelic.

    Posted by jonk · January 27, 2005 05:01 PM
    Crooked Timber/blog

    Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.-- Søren Kierkegaard

  10. #20
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Film Critics at Center of Controversy Over Eastwood Film

    Film Critics at Center of Controversy Over Eastwood Film
    credit: Aya Kawano




    By Brian Orloff

    Published: January 31, 2005 4:00 PM ET

    NEW YORK Clint Eastwood's drama "Million Dollar Baby" may be racking up the critical praise and plaudits -- including seven Academy Award nominations -- but it's what critics aren't saying that has become the real story, according to some. Critics' silence over the film's final emotional/ethical twist, is sparking ethical debate among activists and film critics alike. A group called Not Dead Yet has sponsored protests and picketing.

    "Any movie that sends a message that having a spinal cord injury is a fate worse than death is a movie that concerns us tremendously," said Marcie Roth, executive director of the American National Spinal Cord Injury Association.

    Thanks to the publicity, by now most readers should know that the film eventually raises serious issues surrounding assisted suicide or "mercy killing." Moviegoers, of course, like most Americans, split on how they feel about it. Was it wrong, in this case, for film critics to refuse to give away the ending? Are they taking too much of a pro-euthanasia stance? Can they even seriously review this movie if they don't discuss its key component?

    "I get angry when I feel that I'm getting told too much," Michael Miner, editor of the Chicago Reader, who wrote a column about this centering on local critic Roger Ebert, told E&P. "But in a case like this it's quite a bit different from the surprise in 'The Crying Game' or the surprise in 'The Sixth Sense.' You find yourself not able to talk about the philosophical core of the movie. This is not just a twist at the end. This is everything about the movie that makes people walk out thinking they've seen something wonderful."

    "Million Dollar Baby" tells the story of a struggling boxer, Maggie (Hilary Swank), who convinces hardened trainer Frankie (Clint Eastwood) to coach her. He reluctantly agrees, and she becomes a success and a surrogate daughter. But after a brutal punch leaves her paralyzed, the film's final one-third takes place in a hospital where Maggie confronts her future and Frankie decides she wants to die.

    Miner wrote about Not Dead Yet, which has protested critics' lack of disclosure, and the film's ending, commenting, "Thanks to the star power of Swank and Eastwood, the film was an endorsement of Maggie's death."

    He told E &P: "I think that's a flaw of the movie that stars ... tend to sweep argument away. What they do seems to be the right thing to do because they're doing it. But this can be said about a lot of movies."

    Ebert fired back, filing a column this past Saturday with the headline "Critics have no right to play spoiler." He wrote: "The characters in movies do not always do what we would do. Sometimes they make choices that offend us. That is their right. It is our right to disagree with them. It is not our right, however, to destroy for others the experience of being as surprised by those choices as we were."


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