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Thread: Anti-depressants can cause gum and tooth decay.

  1. #1

    Anti-depressants can cause gum and tooth decay.

    Reported last Saturday on CNN Headline News: It was reported that anti-depressants can cause gum and tooth decay.

    I know that many of us are using anti-depressants to decrease nerve pain. This may explain why I have had two teeth already capped. It is recommended that those who are taking these medications, drink a lot of water to keep your mouth from drying up and brush your teeth at least twice a day.
    PN

  2. #2
    I just copied this over from the Cure Forum where it was not getting much attention.

    The mechanisms underlying tooth and gum decay are interesting. Antidepressant and other medications alter salivary quality and quantity. By the way, when these drugs are combined with smoking which is another known and well-established cause of tooth and gum decay, your mouth gets a double whammy.


    • Koller MM, Purushotham KR, Maeda N, Scarpace PJ and Humphreys-Beher MG (2000). Desipramine induced changes in salivary proteins, cultivable oral microbiota and gingival health in aging female NIA Fischer 344 rats. Life Sci. 68 (4): 445-55. Summary: Cyclic antidepressants are still a dominating group of psychotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of depression. One of their major side effect is salivary gland dysfunction (oral dryness, xerostomia), leading in humans to increased oral disease and dysfunction of speech, chewing, swallowing and taste. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of the long-term administration of the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine and the reversibility of this treatment following a 15 d washout period on specific salivary proteins, composition of oral microbiota, and oral health (gingivitis) of aging female F344 rats. Total salivary proteins showed decreased concentrations with age and desipramine. Similar SDS/PAGE protein profiles appeared in all phases but in different relative amounts with age and treatment. While certain proteins maintained steady levels (lactoferrin) or decreased with age and treatment (amylase), the synthesis of proline-rich proteins, high molecular weight mucin-type glycoproteins, and lysozyme was induced with desipramine and age. The oral microbiota was significantly changed with age and the administration of the antidepressant. The incidence of gingivitis with desipramine was highest in the oldest animals, For the different parameters measured, recovery was delayed with age. These data indicate, that desipramine has profound effects on salivary protein secretion. This may partially explain the changes in microbiota and the increased incidence of gingivitis. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&li st_uids=11205893> Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Claude Denson Pepper Center for Research on Oral Health in Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville 32610, USA. mmkoller@zzmk.unizh.ch


    • Koller MM, Maeda N, Scarpace PJ and Humphreys-Beher MG (2000). Desipramine changes salivary gland function, oral microbiota, and oral health in rats. Eur J Pharmacol. 408 (1): 91-8. Summary: Tricyclic antidepressants are still a dominating group of psychotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of depression. Oral dryness is one of their major side-effects, leading in humans to increased oral disease and dysfunction of speech, chewing, swallowing and taste. We previously reported that the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine desensitizes beta-adrenergic signal transduction in salivary glands. In this study, we evaluated the effects of this treatment on parotid and submandibular gland function, oral microbiota, and oral health in rats. Total protein secretion and salivary alpha-amylase was not affected by treatment, while cellular alpha-amylase and the content of epidermal growth factor was depressed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed increased secretion for proline-rich proteins and glycoproteins. Surprisingly, flow rates were temporarily increased. These alterations in salivary gland function may partially explain the observed changes in oral microbiota and the increased incidence of gingivitis. Under other nutritional conditions, desipramine might have more severe impacts on oral health. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&li st_uids=11070187> Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Claude Denson Pepper Center for Research on Oral Health in Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. mmkoller@zzmk.unizh.ch


    • McClain DL, Bader JD, Daniel SJ and Sams DH (1991). Gingival effects of prescription medications among adult dental patients. Spec Care Dentist. 11 (1): 15-8. Summary: The relationship between self-reported medication use (exposure to one or more drugs with anticipated gingival effect--antidepressants, diuretics, antihypertensives, hormones) and four measures of gingival conditions (plaque index, gingival index, calculus index, maximum CPITN score) was examined among 594 patients in 35 dental practices in two North Carolina counties. Patients with long-term medication use were compared to patients without long-term use on four measures of gingival condition. When controlling for sex and age within age group, medication use was a significant predictor (P less than 0.05) for elevated gingival and plaque index scores among the white less than 65 group. For the white 65+ group (N = 90), medication use was not a significant predictor for any index score. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&li st_uids=1948555> Coastal Carolina Community College, Jacksonville, NC.

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