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Thread: ssdi eligibility

  1. #1

    ssdi eligibility

    IM CURIOUS. A GUY HERE A WORK, HIS WIFE IS A WALKING PARA(SHE WALKS IN BRACES) SHES 10 YEARS POST AND CANT WORK ANYMORE DUE TO PAIN AND MOBILITY ISSUES. THEY TURNED HER DOWN FOR SSDI. SHE HAS SOME 125K IN INVESTMENTS, AND THAT WAS THE DENIAL REASON.
    DOES THAT SOUND RITE

  2. #2
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    Doesn't sound right. I don't remember any questions regarding bank accounts or investments on the forms for SSDI. Seems like if she is unable to work due to her disability, that should be the criteria.

  3. #3
    i thought that someone w/ sci was a slamdunk for ssdi

  4. #4
    More than 50% of ALL SSA claims are denied on the first round. There is SSDI as well as SSI. One is asset based the other is disability based. If she was denied based on assets, it does not preclude a disability decision from still being made. If she is deemed disabled, it will be 6 months before she receives benefits and 2 yrs until she gets Medicare.

    She should file an appeal, sooner than later.

    "A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles"....C. Reeve 1998


  5. #5
    Senior Member Kaprikorn1's Avatar
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    fuentes...I believe you're confusing SSDI (Soc Sec Disab Insur) and SSI (Supplementary Security Income).

    With SSDI, if a person is deemed disabled by soc sec admin, whatever percentage of disability they have...they can receive SSDI based on what their earnings were throughout their working life...modified by the percentage of disability. You can have millions in assets and still receive your SSDI.

    With SSI...you must prove need, disability, and lack of other assets in order to receive it. SSI is the "safety net" for those who have no or limited ability to pay for life needs. This also applies to medicare.

    Kap

    "It's not easy being green"

  6. #6
    Originally posted by Kaprikorn1:

    fuentes...I believe you're confusing SSDI (Soc Sec Disab Insur) and SSI (Supplementary Security Income).

    With SSDI, if a person is deemed disabled by soc sec admin, whatever percentage of disability they have...they can receive SSDI based on what their earnings were throughout their working life...modified by the percentage of disability. You can have millions in assets and still receive your SSDI.

    With SSI...you must prove need, disability, and lack of other assets in order to receive it. SSI is the "safety net" for those who have no or limited ability to pay for life needs. This also applies to medicare.

    Kap

    "It's not easy being green"
    no im not cofusing them kap. she worked for 10 years after her injury. so she has the credits for disibility. i thought it was odd.

  7. #7
    SSI is the "safety net" for those who have no or limited ability to pay for life needs. This also applies to medicare.
    Medicare is not assets based, Medicaid is. The guidelines for Medicaid eligibility vary from state to state. Medicare is received with retirement or disability and can be received in combination with Medicaid or alone.

    A good intacke at SS will process the individual for SSDI as well as SSI. This insures enough quarter as well as makes sure the individual receives maximum benefits. If anyone feels that SSA has wrongfully denied benefits, they should appeal. I have seen individuals on vents be denied benefits.

    "A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles"....C. Reeve 1998


  8. #8
    Here is a list of some books that are available on this topic. Check with your local library or bookstore. If they are not available go to Paralysis Resource CenterAn interlibrary loan may be possible.

    Medicaid/Medicare/Social Security Books


    · Cooper, Laura D. Insurance Solutions: Plan Well, Live Better. New York, NY: Demos Medical Publishing, 2002.

    Covers private health and disability insurance as well as Social Security Disability.

    · Conklin, Joan Harkins. Medicare for the Clueless: The Complete Guide to this Federal Program. New York: Citadel Press, 2002.

    · Davis, Mike. How to Get SSI and Social Security Disability: An Insider's Step by Step Guide. San Jose, CA: Writers Club Press, 2000.

    · Epstein, Lita. The Complete Idiot's Guide to Social Security. Indianapolis, IN: Alpha Books, 2002.

    Also covers disability benefits, Medicare and Medigap coverage.

    · Matthews, Joseph. Social Security, Medicare & Government Pensions. Berkeley, CA: Nolo, 2002.

    Covers disability benefits and veteran benefits.

    · Morton, David A. III. Nolo's Guide to Social Security Disability: Getting and Keeping Your Benefits. Berkeley, CA: Nolo, 2001.

    · Northrop, Dorothy E. and Stephen Cooper. Health Insurance Resources: Options for People with a Chronic Disease or Disability. New York, NY: Demos Medical Publishing, 2003.

    Covers Medicare, Medicaid, SSDI, COBRA.

    · Rosen, Diana. Social Security for the Clueless: The Complete Guide to SSA Benefits. New York: Citadel Press, 2002.

    Has a chapter on disability benefits.



    · Smith. Douglas M. Disability Workbook for Social Security Applicants: Managing Your Application for Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits. Arnold, MD: Physicians' Disability Services Inc., 2001.

    · Stein, Judith A. and Alfred J. Chiplin Jr. 2002 Medicare Handbook. Frederick, MD: Panel Publishers, 2002.

    Note this book is not a quick read it covers the actual law.

    · Tomkiel, Stanley A. III. The Social Security Benefits Handbook. Naperville, IL: Sphinx Publishing, 2001.

    Covers disability benefits and Medicare.

    "A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles"....C. Reeve 1998


  9. #9
    Are you sure she applied for SSDI and not SSI?

    She should receive SSDI despite her assests.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    I think there is a 6 month waiting period for SSDI, but otherwise she should probably get it. The best way is to go through a social worker at a rehab, or maybe a physiatrist's office could help.

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