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Thread: Foley cathether

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Foley cathether

    I plan to travel by plane. Some people in the women's support group suggest using foley cathether while traveling to solve the cathing problem. I never used it except the time when I was transferred from the hospital to the rehab center after I was injured. Do I need prescription
    to order it and the leg bag ? Is it easy to have the caregiver to put on and take out ?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
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    I think you can order both the catheter and the bag without a precsription. You'll need a syringe and saline solution to fill up the balloon that holds it in place. I've only used one a couple times, and they're pretty easy to put in and take out. The first time my Dad did it, the second time I did it myself, and I'm a quad. You insert it like a regular catheter, inflate the balloon with 5cc of fluid (I think that's how much it was, but you'll want to double check) then gently pull it until it catches. Hook it up to the leg bag and you're good to go.

    ~Rus

    "Because you're not promised tomorrow." ~ Stuck Mojo

  3. #3
    yes, u do need a script. it says right on the package via fed law (pretty stupid, hah). i justy found out myself.

  4. #4

    Indwelling catheter

    This can be a good way to manage on a long trip. Talk to your urologist, as they may want you to take a one time antibiotic in conjunction with this use.

    If your caregiver knows how to catheterize with sterile technique they can do it (it is more difficult for females than males). Clean technique is fine for intermittent cath, but not recommended for indwelling. If not, see if you have any nurse friends who will put in for you or teach your caregiver to do it.

    Remember you will probably need to put one in for the flight home too, so you need at least 2 kits. Your insurance may cover, but with a Rx you can purchase whereever you want (check prices). Generally they run $15-20.

    Recommend you get a silver coated catheter if possible (Bardix IC is a good one). Get it with an insertion kit...this should include a catheter, lubricant, sterile gloves, Betadine swabs, a small tray and a syringe filled with water. We always put 10 cc. in a 5 cc. balloon. Keep the syringe (in your checked luggage) to use in removing the catheter once you arrive.

    The leg bag will have to be ordered separately (it does not require a prescription). I can recommend either the Bard Flip-Flo or the Hollister leg bags.

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
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    I did get an infection the 2nd time I used a foley. I only used clean technique, but then sterile would have been near impossible. Besides, I ran out of externals and I had to go to work. What was I to do? I made sure from then on I ordered my externals well in advance.

    BTW, Hollister bags are great. They have nice, wide elast/fabric straps and an easy to open/close valve. Good luck.

    ~Rus

    "Because you're not promised tomorrow." ~ Stuck Mojo

  6. #6

    Foley and Traveling

    In talking with friends, a foley is the best way to go for the plane but if that is not an option, there are aisle chairs on the plane that you could use to go to the bathroom. It's a law that these chairs be on the airplane. In terms of the foley, they are covered by insurance and this place called UroMed will get the script for you, bill your insurance and ship it for free. They carry foleys, intermittant caths, leg bags, bed bags and things like that. Feel free to give them a call at 800-841-1233 and Anne M. is who does all the work on this stuff. Good Luck and enjoy the vacation.

  7. #7

    Flying

    I would not depend on aisle chairs on board the plane unless you are very strong. The cabin crew are NOT required to assist you in the transfer...only in wheeling the aisle chair. Once you get to the bathroom, even the so-called "accessible" airplane bathrooms can be a nightmare unless you are able to stand unassisted.

    (KLD)

  8. #8
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
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    True, there are airline employees who will lift you into your seat when boarding/deboarding, but the flight crew is not trained to do this nor would you want them to try. They'd probably pull their back put and sue you. The aisle chairs I've seen were never on board the plane. The ground crew brought them to the plane.

    ~Rus

    "Because you're not promised tomorrow." ~ Stuck Mojo

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