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Thread: End of life decisions

  1. #11
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    Not only is it wise to have a directive in place while in command of falculties, and not on drugs, but also smart to have informed relative to help enforce this. My oldest brother was terminal, blind, deaf from antibiotics and in great pain with a dnr signed and notice put up in room--yet I had to physically restrain them from a code blue in the heat of the moment. They had already put him through it "because he's so young"! One of the hardest things I had to do, but his wishes needed to be respected.

  2. #12
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    Not only is it wise to have a directive in place while in command of falculties, and not on drugs, but also smart to have informed relative to help enforce this. My oldest brother was terminal, blind, deaf from antibiotics and in great pain with a dnr signed and notice put up in room--yet I had to physically restrain them from a code blue in the heat of the moment. They had already put him through it "because he's so young"! One of the hardest things I had to do, but his wishes needed to be respected.

  3. #13
    Member Slider82's Avatar
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    context

    A disabled person choosing assisted suicide because they have no money, family, or place to live is something that should NEVER happen. Personally I would never think about doing that under any circumstances but then I've been blessed with a great family. The scariest trend happening right now is that people's medical choices are being more and more limited on account of profit-driven health care, otherwise known as another shining example of free market enterprise. I honestly wonder if some day we crips are going to be pressurized into becoming human sacrifices for the profit motives.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Originally posted by chick:


    However, in the context of disability where there is no terminal illness or disease but only a chronic incurable condition, the issue may be less straight-forward. The desire to end pain and suffering may go beyond health and medically defined conditions. A disabled person's desire to end the pain of living with a severe disabling condition may require a deeper look at competence and informed consent.
    Why a deeper look and can you expound on the informed consent, Chick? I have never had a head injury, no chronic mental illness, IQ in the triple digits and updated my living will and advance directive and DNR two years post. I've volunteered and been in 2 clinical trials where I read every word of the informed consent before signing them and even asked a few questions.

    There are certain things that I do not want to go through. I feel the old body here and the adaptability and desire to adapt more mentally are just not there. Would I agree to an amputation of a leg at the hip due to HO? No way. Need the assistance of a vent due to a syrinx increasing upward? Not for me. ME! I know so many who adapt, grit their teeth and not only go on but enjoy the extra time, the challenges, etc. I'm not one of them.

    I guess I saw enough death and dying young that I was doing a fairly good job of enjoying all my days before my injury. Yep, even lazy stretch out on the sofa and snooze days. Hit an awful lot of my life goals of what I wanted to do and see and experience. I figure at this point that my DNR is rather explicit; DNR unless there is a very good chance that I will recover from whatever put me in the state of needing resuscitating and there is a real chance (over 50% not .05%) it will fix a good deal of my currrent disability. So hell yea, if I get a fetal tissue implant and react badly to the knock out juice feel free to jolt me a few times. But if I'm going down and out from full lungs from my 3rd bout of pnuemonia? Don't bother me. Been there, done that and it's ok on the other side.

    I'm not rich and I'm not poor but we have planned for future contingencies. No one is going to drive this bad ass broad into assisted suicide unless I want to go there. I worry more about docs who are afraid of being sued for someone's choosing self-suicide using pain meds the doc prescribed. That means the rest of will be living with a lot more pain that isn't necessary.

    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

  5. #15
    Senior Member Cspine's Avatar
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    you arent planning on 'checking out' early are you?



    'the voices in my head tell me to burn things..........'

  6. #16
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Cspine:

    you arent planning on 'checking out' early are you?
    I like reading the final chapter to see what happens. No, I'm not planning on ceasing to breath at the moment. But I am also not some mental midget that needs a group like NDY to tell me that. I resent their implication that I am too whatever to make my own choices.

    I redid my DNR two years post just to prevent someone from saying I made my decisions "in a state of depression too soon after injury to know their were other choices", blah, blah, blah.

    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

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