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Thread: My diary: Building a new home

  1. #41
    Senior Member krajaxa's Avatar
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    Wow,

    I was impressed by the vast amount of information you folks have described here...

    We are in process of deciding between adapting and building. I'm more inclined to building... One of the companies I work for builds homes and my boss just told me today he would build one for us. His general flexibility is one of the great pros. Yesterday, I just got to see the house they finished up and were showing at the Parade of Homes. It's not build as wheelchair accessible, but I saw that most of the doorways were wider that usually and I just fell in love with the master bathroom - plenty of space. There is lots of space in the kitchen, I really like the idea of two drawer dishwasher that pull out.

    Now my only question is, did you guys just go to the internet and found a floorplan you liked and had it adapted to your needs?

    We are still in process of looking for property, so we are definitely in the beginning stage.

    Good luck with your house Clipper, it's looking great!


  2. #42
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
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    Originally posted by krajaxa:

    Now my only question is, did you guys just go to the internet and found a floorplan you liked and had it adapted to your needs?
    In my case, this particular house had already been designated for this particular lot. We were given the opportunity to alter the plans, although we couldn't do anything that would change the "footprint" of the house. The inside was fair game. We had to pay architect fees to do this (less than $5,000). Building from scratch would have been too costly and too much of a headache, in my opinion.

    Below is a photo of the sink I have selected for both of the full bathrooms. It's a Murro Wall-Mount Sink made by American Standard. It measures 21 inches wide (15.5-inch bowl width, 22 inches front to back (13.5-inch bowl) and 5 inches deep. I'm also getting the pictured shroud/knee contact guard. American Standard has a nice feature on its Web site that allows you to search for ADA compliant sinks such as this one. My current bathroom sink also is an American Standard, but it's a bit too institutional-looking.

  3. #43
    Clipper, it does indeed sound as if you have thought things through very throroughly. I hope the remainder of the building process goes smoothly for you.

  4. #44

    Just a warning about pull down shelves...

    We had these installed in our upper cupboards to allow more accessible storage space but they are pretty much impossible for me (C 7/8) to use. We even removed one pneumatic ram to make it easier to pull down, but it's still very difficult. Also two of them are above counters with cabinets at the base so I can't get close enough to pull them down anyhow. An OT reccomended them and they sounded great bt in reality they aren't appropriate for me (maybe good for a para).

    "Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow"
    ~ Anon

  5. #45
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
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    Below is a photo of the cooktop that we considered. It's made by Dacor and has an even surface. The best feature is the touch top -- no pressure needed to activate the controls. I tried it out at a store and found it very easy to use, though quite pricey. It's a good alternative if you have little or no finger dexterity.

  6. #46
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    Clipper,

    Didn't read the entire thread so ignore the sugestions if the have already been posted. I'm on my third house so I have done a few adaptions. Definately slope the entire bathroom floor towards a barrier free shower drain. No threshold in the shower. Accidents can just be rinsed away. I had a Dacor cook top with the disapearing vent. The cook top was over priced, and didn't like the way it heated. Even sprung for the halogen burner. I like to cook but didn't like it. If you were considering the disapearing vent, unless it is against an outside wall the vent will have to be mounted under the cooktop or in a cabinet then piped out. Takes up room and may limit your foot room. I found a large overhead exhaust hood is cheaper and works better. Went to sell the house and the key board failed on the vent. Check out replacement parts and service charges from Dacor and make your own decision.The coolest thing I would suggest is X-10 Lighting and outlet controls. Go to Smarthome.com. You can control lights and appliances with table top controlers and tv learning remotes. You can dim almost every light you set up and can hook it into your computer. You can even have it turn on lights and appliances based on your routine.Its not that expensive, gives me more independence (and control) and definitley increases the value of the house. Sold two of my homes to abled bodied couples becaused they loved the bathrooms and the lighting features. Just my 2 cents..

  7. #47
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
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    Well, the first "significant" glitch has occurred. Both of my full bathrooms have rather large tiled roll-in showers. Unfortunately, the plans did not provide enough direction to the builders when the subfloor went in. This was only caught when the builder mentioned having to construct a threshhold at the entrance to each shower. Wrong!

    The subfloor of the shower should have been dropped below the subfloor of the rest of the bathroom to allow for the extra stuff that goes in under a shower (such as the pan). This results in the shower being slightly higher than the rest of the bathroom, thus the need for some type of threshhold to allow for proper drainage.

    Since ripping out the subfloor was not an option at this point, we decided on a different solution. Both bathrooms are fairly long, so the concrete guy is going to build a gradual slope in the bathroom up to the shower, then slope down as planned into the drain. The slope will be minimal and not noticeable. And no threshhold will be required.

    This obviously isn't the ideal solution, but it'll work out nicely. I hope to get photos up of the rough bathroom very soon.

  8. #48
    You have to watch them like at hawk at every step. Inspect, inspect and then inspect again at every stage. Take lots of photos too so you can keep records of what is behind the walls, etc. We had tile guys who tiled over electrical outlets in the bathroom. Having photos let us know exactly where they need to rip out tiles. Many similar issues can be saved by having lots of photos.

    (KLD)

  9. #49
    Senior Member ~Patrick~'s Avatar
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    I found this doing some research for other stuff. It gives alot of fine details you need to think of when designing a kitchen.

    http://www.bobvila.com/ArticleLibrar...leKitchen.html

  10. #50
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
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    Thanks, Pat. This is an excellent link.

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