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Thread: ? on syrinx

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    saratoga springs, ny
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    187

    ? on syrinx

    Do they ever reduce in size on their own? I have a small syrinx (3mm). My neuro doesn't think it will grow....But i hate the fact that i have one.

    Just wondering

    I do go to cranial sacral therarpy in hopes that it imporve my flow of CSF and in return will address my syrinx.

  2. #2

    Syrinx

    It would be unusual for a syrinx to reduce in size on its own, and while it probably will not hurt, it is unlikely (and not documented) that craniosacral therapy would help this.

    Many physicians feel that if the person has no symptoms or only mild symptoms it is best to just watch the syrinx with periodic MRIs, and only intervene if it starts to enlarge or symptoms appear or get worse. There is some risk in doing the syrinx surgery, so this is the more conservative approach. A second opinion can always be sought if you are not sure of your physician's approach. (KLD)

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    saratoga springs, ny
    Posts
    187
    The problem is, that most insurance co. will not pay for an MRI just to keep an eye on a syrinx. It's been about ayear & 4 months since my last MRI & I would love to take another look at it. I guess if i made some false complaints i could get one.

  4. #4
    I agree with KLD. Most syrinxes do not go away spontaneously. As pointed out elsewhere, many result from cerebrospinal fluid flow into the spinal cord when their path has been obstructed around the injury site. Others may result from obstruction of the central canal. Still others that are localized only to the injury site may be due to loss of damaged tissues.

    Until fairly recently, because the success rate of surgery to eliminate syrinxes was low, most surgeons were reluctant to operate unless a syrinx was associated with progressive neurological loss. This is just beginning to change now because of the recognition of the role of spinal cord adhesions and tethering in syrinx formation.

    Angus, I am surprised that your insurance company will not pay for regular MRI of your spinal cord to check on progression of a syrinx. Are you sure that it is the insurance company and not your doctor? I cannot imagine that the insurance company would not pay for a scan if a doctor ordered it and said that he/she thought that it was medically necessary.

    Wise.

  5. #5

    Sad but true

    Dr. Young, unfortunately this is all too often the case. I have done a number of mal-practice expert witness cases where a physician's order for an MRI was turned down by an HMO because the patient had had one before, even if there was still no explaination for symptoms or symptoms progressed. Until HMOs are held to the same risk of loosing malpractice cases as private physicians (ie, jury decided settlements, not just binding arbitration), I am afraid this will only increase as more and more people are under the thumb of "mangled care". (are my biases showing???!!!)

    (KLD)

  6. #6
    I wonder if this is still the norm with insurance companies since you have written this post 8 years ago.
    "So I have stayed as I am, without regret, seperated from the normal human condition." Guy Sajer

  7. #7
    Unfortunately, it is still common to have to wait long periods of time or have an outright denial of a request or prescription for an MRI in the USA, esp. if you have an HMO/PPO.

    (KLD)

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