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Thread: Anyone else have trouble with elevators?

  1. #1
    Senior Member SlomoScott's Avatar
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    Anyone else have trouble with elevators?

    ok, I've got a part-time job that will soon be full-time.
    right now, someone drives me to/from work, but I'm going for an eval and will have my van modified with high tech driving controls.
    The main door to work does not have a remote opener but my employer will fix that.
    for the most part I'm on my way to independence at work, BUT I work on the 2nd floor and I can't operate the @%$&*! elevator buttons! It is my Road Runner!

    I'm a C5 Quad, but that is only after some recovery. I spent almost 2 years as a C4, therfore I don't have the strength / flexibility of someone who has always been a C5.

    I am currently trying to use a stick with a vinyl tip to push the buttons, but I can't push hard enough to trip the button. Because of my leg rests, I can't get close to the wall so my arm is really stretched when I try to press the buttons.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    I know exactly what you're talking about. Try this:

    Instead of trying to push the button with part of your hand, try to use your elbow. Pull in so your shoulder lines up with the front of the elevator, you might just find that your elbow can easily find the button. Sometimes the button is too far away, but if I maneuvered my chair (like turning your chair into the side that the buttons are on at an angle, but still keeping the buttons to the side lined up with your shoulders) or leaned a bit , it did the trick. Quite a few times I found myself still in the doorway, so don't pull all the way in because the doors might shut and you might need the room behind you to get your elbow close enough to the buttons. You should have strong enough shoulder muscles to do that. I am a complete C5. Now I have the help of my service dog Dexter.

    Let me know how you make out. Good luck!

    -Lewis

  3. #3
    How high is the button and how high can you raise your arm?

    http://homepage.mac.com/bradd/Menu9.html

    Brad

  4. #4
    How many floors does the building have? Where I work, the elevator button is heat sensative...you only have to get about 1/2" from the button and it turns on. This can be done with your elbow or any body part. In addition, since we only have two floors, whenever anyone enters the elevator it automatically senses this with an electric eye and actives the button for the other floor. At a another rehab center that I know of they have 3 floors, and the elevator automatically stops at each floor in succession. This would be a reasonable accomodation by your employer as you must have access to your office.

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    what is your job?

  6. #6
    Senior Member SlomoScott's Avatar
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    sorry about the delay...it was a much more beautiful weekend than expected.

    I can lift my arm as high as my shoulder, I'm working on getting better. My problem is strength once my arm is stretched out. The button requires constsant pressure, I can't just "whack" it and have it work.

    My building has 3 floors Ground, 1, and 2. I enter on the 1st floor and work on 2.
    Thanks for the info on the thermal button...that's good info.

    I'm now working as a software engineer. I program in C for a subcontractor to the FAA. We are working on the next generation communication link between the ground and aircraft. Pretty interesting stuff.

    Anyone know if there is funding available for employers to modify the workplace?

    Thanks for all the feedback!\

  7. #7
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    if it does not mean major high cost to fix the elevator, and it shouldn't, your company should fix it. thats the law.

  8. #8
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    I use a lift that required constant pressure on the button. The lift manufacturer replaced the wiring and button so it was a button that only had to be pushed once. It should not be expensive to fix.
    Andrew

    "You can stand me up at the gates of hell
    But I won't back down"
    Tom Petty

  9. #9
    Senior Member SlomoScott's Avatar
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    Lewis is a genius!
    My elbow worked on the 2nd attempt.
    Hooray for small victories. Now I need to work on moving into the elevator quicker...right now I have someone hold the door for me.
    It's amazing that something as simple as pushimng a button could put me in such a good mood...now if only the Flyers could make it past the 1st round of the play-offs!
    thanks again, everyone.

  10. #10
    On most modern elevators the delay time for door closing is very easily adjusted. Ask your manager to discuss this with your building manager or maintenance people and contact the elevator maintenance company to arrange this. They should also know about how to set up the electric eye arrangement that I mentioned before for the interior elevator controls.

    Companies that put in accessibilty improvements are eligible for tax benefits. It is their responsibility to provide and pay for them though, both for employees and for customers. If they are an FAA subcontractor they also come under Federal access regulations as stringent or more stringent than the ADA.

    (KLD)

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