Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Home Health when you're employed?

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Senior Member pixyvixen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    the dirty south
    Posts
    148

    Home Health when you're employed?

    So my boyfriend has a question, and it is this: when you're employed and no longer qualify for medicare/medicaid, how do you have a home health aid? I mean, how do you pay for it? Does private insurance take up the cost? How do you continue to get the help you need without having to drain your pockets?

    I guess this could lead into a whole new discussion of being forced to depend upon the government because it's all or nothing when it comes to government help. Grrrr.

  2. #2
    pixy - this is where the system is messed up. i'm right there too... it's like the government will only help if you're below poverty, and so if you want to work as a disabled citizen, which is hard enough, they do drain your pockets. where's the incentive to work? it's a stupid catch-22.

    i know medicare has a form of copayment if you're over a certain level, which unfortunately is ridiculous b/c you have to disclose EVERYTHING to them, therefore eliminating privacy, much less any independence. they get to be the deciding factor in everything.

    i HATE government systems... it's gotten to the point where i've paid out-of-pocket the last month or so b/c the state agencies around here have been such a pain. hopefully in due time i'll pull in enough income to deal with this on my own. i dunno, it's very frustrating to me too... & finding *reasonable* helpers? that's another story... ugh.

    good call on checking with insurance though... and maybe investigate if your bf's work has any form of coverage... it's worth a shot!

    regardless, i'm right there with ya. what's your bf thinking of doing re: work?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,516
    Insurance usually only pays if the person you hire is an RN. They won't pay for anyone else. Indeed, this is where the system is totally fubar.

  4. #4
    I haven't read the Medicaid rules recently, but I doubt that there have been changes. In the red book put out by the SSA which describe work incentives, look up reg. 1619 A&B. These explain how you can keep your medical benefits once you begin to work. You can make the case that without these benefits you will be unable to work, even if you get insurance, because of the ongoing need for supplies and equipment. If I recall correctly, Medicare can be maintained for nearly 5 years after you exhaust your trial work period. Contact your Board of Social Services, Independent Living Center, or SSA directly at (800) 772-1213. However, don't be surprised if no one there can help you. Also some states have contracts with disability agencies to help you advocate for these benefits with Social Security. I don't remember the name, but the acronyms is WINS. Post again and let me know what you find, and I'll try to do more research.

  5. #5
    Medicaid for the Working Disabled

    Pixy et al,

    South Carolina has a program I recently found out about called Medicaid for the Working Disabled which allows a person to make up to a little over $40k a year with an asset limit of $4000. Basically, housing and such are considered living expenses and do not count against your assets. Try contacting your Medicaid office and asking specifically about "Medicaid for the Working Disabled." Perhaps your state has a similar plan.

    -Steven

  6. #6
    TICKET TO WORK

    SSA has a new work "incentive "program that allows for continuation of benfits for a longer period of time. The program is being implemented slowly with specific states participating each year. Go to www.ssa.gov to see if your state is currently acepting individuals. These changes are an attempt to break away from gov't benefit enslavement! To many people want to work but are trpped because of this issue.
    Also, your bf can try to get a PASS plan approved by SS throught your state VR office. This MUST be in place before employment is accepted. It allows you to "spend down your income and assets" if they are necessary for employment. A good PASS plan can leave you with minimal $$$ gain on paper and allow you to continue to receive SS and medicaid.The hitch here is a GOOD VR counselor who an write an effective PASS plan.
    Keep us posted and good luck.

    "Don't worry about the world coming to an end today.
    It's already tomorrow in Australia!"----- Charles Schultz


  7. #7
    Originally posted by Steven Edwards:

    _Medicaid for the Working Disabled_

    Pixy et al,

    South Carolina has a program I recently found out about called Medicaid for the Working Disabled which allows a person to make up to a little over $40k a year with an asset limit of $4000. Basically, housing and such are considered living expenses and do not count against your assets. Try contacting your Medicaid office and asking specifically about "Medicaid for the Working Disabled." Perhaps your state has a similar plan.

    -Steven
    wow, this would be a miracle. I'm going to research this state. It depends on your state pixy, every one is different.
    Interesting South Carolina has set these amounts. Thx Steven.

  8. #8
    Hello
    I run a "domestic household" business for my PCA's. I do their accounting/taxes/etc. At first it was difficult to figure everything out, but now I'm doing "ok". I no longer receive SS as I make money. I got a letter that said because I make substantial wages I no longer am disabled and therefor do not need SSDI. I payed back overpayments in both SSDI and Medicare amounts.

    If you keep medicare, you have a monthly premium you must pay. (as ssi or ssdi no longer picks up tab).

    My private insurance pickjs up most evcerythjing, but I haven't been in the hospiotal or have major things done, so its not been bad. The premiums copme out of paycheck, just like anyone else, you know.

    I do not get help w homehealth as you must be "hopmebound". I spose if you had someone top help you fight youn could get it. So, I put ads in publications, put flyers up at public places/stores etc and hope for calls. I have good response with my adds at drugstores/grocery stores. Having your own business is great for your managerial skills LOL.

    But I love working/being independant and I would not change it for the world. Being off the system will be your greatest accomplishment if you can do it. Our world is so backwards. Support your boyfriend if thjis is what he wants. When you do it alone, it is very hard, so stand by your man! Good luck!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,516
    Originally posted by Lizbv:

    I got a letter that said because I make substantial wages I no longer am disabled and therefor do not need SSDI.
    Yeah, I'm not "disabled" either. Makes me wonder what this wheelchair is for.

  10. #10
    Originally posted by Clipper:

    Originally posted by Lizbv:
    I got a letter that said because I make substantial wages I no longer am disabled and therefor do not need SSDI.
    Yeah, I'm not "disabled" either. Makes me wonder what this wheelchair is for.
    hehe

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •