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Thread: Manual Tire Chains?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Eagle River, AK, USA
    Posts
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    Manual Tire Chains?

    Does anyone know where to get chains (like for a car) that you can use on a manual chair? If you do are they more trouble than they are worth?

    Thanks
    JP

  2. #2

    Tire chains

    Most people I know just use knobby tires for the snow. I have seen (years ago) ads for wheelchair chains, but could not find anything on the web now. I did find this information:

    Brand Name : GROUND GRABBERS
    Description :
    Ground grabbers act like miniature automobile tire chains. Increases wheelchair traction in mud, sand, ice or snow. Simply roll onto the chain while guiding the elastic bands over the wheel. Designed for standard 24 inch wheels. Custom sizes available. Specify wheelchair manufacturer and size.

    Price :
    Contact manufacturer

    Price Date :
    DEC 1999

    Available from :
    Manufacturer.

    Manufacturer Information :
    G & R Specialties, Route 2 Box 140, Elgin, TX 78621, 512-285-5379.

    Brand Name : SNO-TRAKS
    Description :
    Sno-Traks are tire chains for manual and electric wheelchairs and scooters for use on snow and ice. Sno-Traks work in the same manner that automobile tire chains function, designed to prevent wheel slippage on slick winter surfaces. The small chains are fixed on water-resistant strips that go around the tire at up to 6 places on manual chair wheels, 5 on electric chair wheels, or 3 on scooter wheels. The strips attach to the tires by means of permanent adhesive backed strips that go on each side of the tire rim at strategic positions around the circumference of the wheel. The chain strips can be removed at any time; the adhesive strips stay on. Strips may be trimmed for a custom fit. Additional sets of adhesive mounting strips are available ($5.99) so that tire chains can be attached to different chairs. A waterproof storage pouch is included. COLORS (of strips): Black, navy blue, hot pink, hot green.

    Price :
    Contact manufacturer

    Price Date :
    DEC 1999

    Available from :
    Manufacturer

    Manufacturer Information :
    Handi-Trak, Inc.
    5150 N. 32nd Street
    Milwaukee, WI 53209
    800-726-7718, 414-466-8725, 414-461-8188 Fax


    An additional problem would be having to remove and reapply them whenever you go in/out of the house or other building...otherwise you would damage the floors.

    (KLD)

  3. #3

    MOUNTAIN BIKE/KNOBBY TIRES

    are what I use.

    "Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow"
    ~ Anon

  4. #4
    Senior Member ~Patrick~'s Avatar
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    Jul 2002
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    Lewistown,Pennsylvania
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    there is an article in this months Paraplegia News on this very subject. You can make your own for about $10.
    You need-
    12 "S" hooks
    6-12' pieces polypro hollowbraid rope
    12 pieces of plastic tube to cover hooks
    2-11" bungee cords

    contact:
    Paul Sandhofer
    PO box 91333
    Anchorage AK 99509-1333
    (907)344-3259

    ...act like a survivor not a victim.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tara's Avatar
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    "Huh Huh Huh.....so you got snow tires for that thing?"
    One of my all time favorite ignorant comments.....Great! Now apparently I could get some if I really wanted!!! lol.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Thanks for the input! I regularly use mountian bike tires on my xcore rims, but am moving into a new apt that has a ramp and parking lot that may get tricky some days. Yea Tara I get the same comment. I love it when people say that while they are staring right at what are pretty obviously mtn bike knobbys on my chair.

    JPW

  7. #7
    Update - Dec 2012 - Sno Traks and Ground Grabbers are no longer sold online. I can't find any source for them offline either.

    The DIY version was from Paraplegia News. It's now known as PN, but I can't find their archives to get to the article mentioned by ~Patrick~.

    Good point from Nurse KLD though....
    ''An additional problem would be having to remove and reapply them whenever you go in/out of the house or other building...otherwise you would damage the floors.''

    I'm lucky to have a spare pair of wheels and tyres that I plan to use with plastic cable ties or chains.
    I was going to use knobbly tires but struggled to find them in my size. The knobliest ones available were Marathon Plus by Schwalbe and cost over £60. So I bought cable ties for a few £ and some chain with small links for £4.
    Not yet got around to fitting them or trying out tho cos' the predicted snow didn't show up round my way (yet?).

  8. #8
    Update - Dec 2012 - Sno Traks and Ground Grabbers are no longer sold online. I can't find any source for them offline either.

    The DIY version was from Paraplegia News. It's now known as PN, but I can't find their archives to get to the article mentioned by ~Patrick~.

    Good point from Nurse KLD though....
    ''An additional problem would be having to remove and reapply them whenever you go in/out of the house or other building...otherwise you would damage the floors.''

    Re-damaging floors with cable ties (or chains?)

    I'm lucky to have a spare pair of wheels and tyres that I plan to use with plastic cable ties or chains so I wouldn't have that problem at home.
    Re- damage to shop floors. Hopefully they wouldn't cause visible damage to most shop floors (the cable ties)? Most of my local ones have what looks like very tough almost stone/marble like stuff.
    If they did damage floors, I guess I would just have to park outside the shop and ask if they could bring the stuff out to me. Not great but better (for me) than being trapped in my home.

    I was going to use knobbly tires but struggled to find them in my size. The knobbliest ones available were Marathon Plus by Schwalbe and cost over £60 a pair. So I bought cable ties for a few £ and some chain with small links for £4.
    Not yet got around to fitting them or trying out tho cos' the predicted snow didn't show up round my way (yet?).

  9. #9

    Post

    I've copied and pasted instructions for cheap DIY snow chains using plastic cable ties

    So even if the website closes/moves the info, we still have copy here. Thanks to Wheelchair Diffusion blog, part of USA Tech Guide by United Spinal.

    Start of copied text-
    Here is an inexpensive do-it-yourself solution that can increase your wheelchair’s tire traction by simulating tire chains and studs. The upfront on this process- This won’t get you to the top of Kilimanjaro but it will help in light snow or on paths that have not been plowed or shoveled down to the bone. It should work on almost all manual wheelchairs. The wheels on powered wheelchairs may limit the number of bands that can be applied but some is certainly better than none.

    How to do-it-yourself:

    1. Get your hands on some sturdy plastic/nylon wire ties that are long enough to go around the thickness of your wheelchair’s tire and wheel. Too long is OK since you can cut the ends off.
    2. Tie 25 to 30 ties evenly around each wheel and tire of a manual wheelchair. Powered wheelchairs and smaller tires will require less or may be limited by the wheel style so use your judgment on those.
    3. Make sure the tie heads (buckle) point slightly outward as in the image above and not downward under the tire. This will help dig snow while making for a smoother ride.
    4. Cut the excess on each tie away and you’re set. Go gettem Nanuk!

    A winter tip for manual wheelchair users: If you have a manual wheelchair with quick release wheels and some extra money or cool friends, get hold of an extra set of wheels and tires. Mount a set of knobby wheelchair tires with traction ties attached and keep around for a quick change as needed.


    Pic from article:




    Where did this cool do-it-yourself wheelchair traction tip come from? Correct, certainly not the wheelchair industry. It seems that cyclists in Europe figured this one out. Resourceful little devils aren’t they?


    End of copied text from:
    http://www.usatechguide.org/blog/whe...rove-traction/

  10. #10
    If you have 25" wheels, you could have a look at Schwalbe snow tires.

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