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Thread: Dying on Your Own Terms

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Dying on Your Own Terms

    Dying on Your Own Terms
    Mon Sep 9, 2:05 PM ET

    (HealthScoutNews) -- Those who contemplate the circumstances of their own death can't be faulted for making sure that their wishes are honored.



    Unpleasant as the thought may be, preparing for such an eventuality by asking someone to be your proxy -- to make your health care decisions when you no longer can -- could be the greatest gift you could give your family and friends -- and yourself.

    Letting nature take its course isn't a pleasant prospect when the dying person is suffering, in a coma that's not likely to lift, or brain dead. A proxy with whom you've discussed this scenario can work with your medical team on decisions aimed at reducing your pain, supporting -- or ceasing support for -- treatment that's merely sustaining your life, but not bringing you closer to recovery.

    Your choice of a proxy -- potentially a very difficult, emotional job, should be carefully considered. Will he be able to even discuss this with you in a calm, reasoned way? Will she be able to commit her time when your 'time' is approaching? Do you want to name more than one proxy 'just in case'? Do you choose a friend or a family member?

    Consider your options well -- but do consider them.

    ==============================
    "Experience teaches that, of all the emotions, fear stands alone in its power to move us, or to capture us in its grip forever. In a world of terrors, there is nothing more fearsome that the unknown...especially when what is unknown is ourselves." Outer Limits(Fear Itself)



  2. #2

    Good warning...

    If it had been 100% my decision at the time of my SCI I would have told the docs to take me into surgery, put me under, remove whatever organs they could take for transplants, and just let me go.

    Getting my advance directive after I had my SCI felt a bit like locking the barn door after the horse has bolted, but I have made it clear to refuse all heroic treatments, feeding tubes, tracheostomies, etc.

    Right now I'm not living on my own terms; dying on my own terms is the best I can hope for.

  3. #3
    Hi, StarlightAngel.

    Nicely put, very well written, and you seem like one gutsy lady! By the way, I am wondering if you are using voice recognition software, and if so, which one.

    PN

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