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Thread: Community Campaign Increases Booster Seat Usage

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Community Campaign Increases Booster Seat Usage

    Community Campaign Increases Booster Seat Usage
    Library: MED
    Keywords: BOOSTER EBEL LAP BELTS HARBORVIEW CAMPAIGN
    Description: Despite evidence that children aged 4 to 8 years old are not adequately protected by adult seat belts, few of these children ride in booster seats. A community booster-seat campaign can significantly increase the use of booster seats and protect children from motor-vehicle injury and death, according to a new study by researchers at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center.



    Contact:
    Susan Gregg-Hanson
    Harborview Medical Center
    206-731-4097

    Community Campaign Increases Booster Seat Usage

    Seattle -- Despite evidence that children aged 4 to 8 years old are not adequately protected by adult seat belts, few of these children ride in booster seats. A community booster-seat campaign can significantly increase the use of booster seats and protect children from motor-vehicle injury and death, according to a new study by researchers at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center.

    The two-year study compared communities in the greater Seattle area, where a booster-seat campaign was begun in 1999, with communities in Portland, Ore., and Spokane, Wash., which served as control sites. Drivers were surveyed in their vehicles when picking up children at child-care centers and schools, with data recorded at baseline, and then 15 months after the start of public-education efforts.

    The educational campaign in the Seattle area brought together community groups, parents, health professionals, community-outreach workers, educators and law-enforcement professionals. TV, radio and print media participated, and educational materials were provided in multiple languages.

    The investigators observed 5,600 children during baseline and follow-up periods, and 3,600 children were eligible for booster seats, based on their ages and weights. Eighty-five percent of drivers agreed to take part in the survey.

    Booster seat usage in the Seattle area nearly doubled during this period. It rose from 16.7 percent to 27.8 percent during the 15-month intervention, compared to an increase from 17.3 percent to 22 percent in the control sites.

    Booster seat usage was greatest for children aged 4-6 years old (26 percent) and relatively rare for children 7-8 years old (9 percent). Booster seat use was more common when the driver wore a seatbelt.

    Washington is the first state to have enacted booster seat legislation. The state's Anton Skeen Law, named in memory of a boy who died in a car crash but would have been saved in a booster seat, takes effect July 1, 2002.

    The study was conducted by Drs. Beth Ebel, a University of Washington (UW) assistant professor of pediatrics; Thomas Koepsell, a UW professor of epidemiology; and Frederick Rivara, a UW professor pediatrics and adjunct professor of epidemiology.

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  2. #2
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Computer Modeling of Injury Mechanisms Shows Booster Seats Protect Young Passengers

    Computer Modeling of Injury Mechanisms Shows Booster Seats Protect Young Passengers
    Library: MED
    Keywords: BOOSTER EBEL LAP BELTS HARBORVIEW
    Description: Lap and shoulder belts, while proven to save the lives of adult passengers, do little for children too small to be protected by seat belts alone. Now, using a computational model, researchers at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center in Seattle have evidence of just how important it is for children between four and eight years of age to be put in booster seats when they ride.



    EMBARGOED UNTIL MAY 7, 2002

    Contact:
    Susan Gregg-Hanson
    Harborview Medical Center
    206-731-4097

    Computer Modeling of Injury Mechanisms Shows Booster Seats Protect Young Passengers

    Seattle -- Lap and shoulder belts, while proven to save the lives of adult passengers, do little for children too small to be protected by seat belts alone. Now, using a computational model, researchers at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center in Seattle have evidence of just how important it is for children between four and eight years of age to be put in booster seats when they ride.

    The investigators studied the response of a 6-year-old child in a frontal collision by using a computer model of a crash dummy of a child that age. The dummy was tested in four seating positions:

    * In a booster seat with adult lap and shoulder belts;
    * Without the booster seat, seated upright, with lap and shoulder belts;
    * Without the booster seat, slouched forward, with lap and shoulder belts;
    * Without the booster seat, and with a lap belt only.

    The computer crash-test results showed a significant increase in injuries when the child dummy was not in a booster seat. Without the booster seat, the shoulder belt caught the child's neck as the head pitched forward. Peak force to the neck was 56 percent greater than it was when the dummy rode in a booster seat.

    With the dummy slouching, the lap belt rode up off the pelvis and over the softer abdomen, resulting in a 22 percent increase in abdominal penetration during impact and placing 200 percent greater force in the lower cervical spine. When the dummy rode with just a lap belt, the torso bent forward over the belt, increasing force to the lumbar spine by 66 percent.

    "Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of injury and death for children 4 to 8 years old,"says Dr. Beth Ebel, the study's principal investigator, Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center and a University of Washington (UW) assistant professor of pediatrics. "Our study shows that children this age who are only restrained in adult seat belts aren't adequately protected. They're at significant risk for injuries to the neck, abdomen and lumbar spine unless they're riding in booster seats."

    Washington is the first state to have enacted booster seat legislation. The state's Anton Skeen Law, named in memory of a boy who died in a car crash but would have been saved in a booster seat, takes effect July 1, 2002.

    In addition to Ebel, the study was conducted by Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center physicians: Allan Tencer, Ph.D., a UW professor of orthopaedics and sports medicine; and Drs. David C. Grossman, a UW professor of pediatrics; Charles N. Mock, a UW assistant professor of surgery and epidemiology; and Frederick Rivara, a UW professor of pediatrics.

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