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Thread: life expectancy after sci

  1. #1

    life expectancy after sci

    I thought that I was told at the time of my injury that as long as I took care of myself, I could expect to live a near full life span if not full. I did that life expectancy sheet and it is telling me that I can expect to only live to 37.6 yo. I don't want to only live to 37, someone please tell me that this is a worst case senario.

  2. #2
    Sebastiang,

    I think you and many others will prove these predictions to be wrong. I think that the site is giving far too conservative estimates of lifespan of people with spinal cord injury.

    Wise.

  3. #3
    Senior Member KLD's Avatar
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    Life span site

    This site is there primarily to serve as a resource for attorneys engaged in civil litigation (mostly personal injury lawyers). If you are a plantiff lawyer, it helps your case to show that the SCI reduces life expectancy. I use these types of numbers when I do expert witnessing, but include many other factors when I look at the individual person and their health care practices.

    Are you sure that 37 years was your life expectancy, or was this the number of years you are expected to live after TODAY? This is how I interpretted the info on that site.

  4. #4

    here is what it said, maybe I misinterpreted

    Life Expectancy = 37.6 years
    Worklife Expectancy = 28.9 years

    What is your opinion?

  5. #5
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    Plus Current ...

    I believe it's your current age PLUS 37.6 ... another thing that I noticed is you have to be one year post injury for it to compute. Beth

  6. #6
    I guess I'll be work on a 100/hr salarie to work only for 6 years and live another 40... 66 years sound like TOO much right?

    Life Expectancy = 40.1 years
    Worklife Expectancy = 6.4 years

    Me.

  7. #7
    The words "life expectancy" has a scientific meaning. It means the average age to which a person is expected to survive. That is at least how I interpreted the results of the survey. In my opinion, this site is underestimating the life expectancy of people with spinal cord injury. Life expectancy is based on the average survival of people in the past. I suspect that the reason why the life expectancy is low is because it took data from the late 1980's and early 1990's as its base. I think that the statistics have changed dramatically. Obviously, life expectancy does depend on the severity of injury and the level of injury. The three major causes of death from spinal cord injury are bladder infections, pulmonary infections, and suicide. All three are essentially preventable phenomena. Therefore, I think that this is something that is correctable if it is true. But I am still skeptical about the prediction.

    Wise.

  8. #8
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    Future Years

    According to this site, my husband's "life expectancy" is 27.8 - and he is 42 years old. The "life table" showing the statistics involved in calculating this "life expectancy" starts with his current age.

    Also, FYI - From the "Help Text" at this site, regarding outputs:

    Worklife Expectancy: The average number of future years of work. This value is computed for the current age and also every future age.

    Life Expectancy: The average number of future years of life. This value is computed for the current age and also every future age, and is often denoted by "e".

    Thanks, Beth

    [This message was edited by GermanyC4 on May 01, 2002 at 02:31 PM.]

  9. #9
    Just so that everybody knows what site is being talked about:

    http://www.LifeExpectancy.com/asp/sci/

    For comparison sake, here are the statistics reported by the National Center for Health Statistics

    All Americans, at Birth: 76.7 (1998)
    All Americans, at Age 65: 17.8 (1998)
    All Males, at Birth: 73.8 (1998)
    All Males, at Age 65: 15.9 (1997)
    All Females, at Birth: 79.5 (1998)
    All Females, at Age 65: 17.8 (1998)
    Source: National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 48, No.18

    You can also calculate your life expectancy without spinal cord injury from the following site for comparison: http://www.beeson.org/livingto100/default.htm

    Wise.

    PS I am moving this over to the Life Forum so that more people can see this.

    [This message was edited by Wise Young on May 01, 2002 at 03:05 PM.]

  10. #10
    Senior Member KLD's Avatar
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    Era of injury

    Several studies have shown that the era of injury is also important. Care is much better today, yet life expectancy information is based on those who have recently died and often have been injured for many years. If you were injured in the 1950s, care was much worse then, and we knew much less about complications and how to both prevent and treat them. It is very likely that people who are injured today (or in the last 10 years) will statistically exceed these numbers. For these reasons the Model SCI Systems Centers (encouraged by Dr. Mike DiVivo's work) are getting away from talking about life expectancy and instead reporting more information about mortality risk factors.

    Keep in mind that these numbers are an AVERAGE. There are many who will exceed this due to good genes and taking good care of themselves. There are many who will not reach this age due to neglect, suicide, and other poor health habits.

    In the USA, the life expectancy for AB men is about 74 (as I remember) yet we all know many men who have far exceeded this "expectancy".

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