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Thread: General Hugh Shelton, former chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff has spinal injury

  1. #1
    Senior Member bill1938's Avatar
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    General Hugh Shelton, former chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff has spinal injury

    God help this man
    Bill M.


    Retired Gen. Hugh Shelton Has Spinal Injury
    Tue Mar 26, 1:04 PM ET

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Retired Army Gen. Henry "Hugh" Shelton, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, suffered a spinal injury over the weekend and is being treated in a military hospital, a spokeswoman said on Tuesday.

    Photos

    Reuters Photo


    The general, a tough paratrooper who retired last September as the top U.S. military officer, was in stable condition at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington.

    "He incurred a spinal injury in a fall at his home on Saturday March 23. He is here pending further evaluation," a hospital spokeswoman said.

    She declined to give details of his condition or to comment on a television news report that the 60-year-old general had been treated in an intensive care unit and had limited use of his arms and legs following the fall off a ladder at his home.

    Known proudly as a "snake eater" with other members of U.S. special forces trained to slog through swamp and jungle on missions, Shelton was chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from October 1997 to September 2001.

    Before that he served in the U.S. Army for 34 years as a specialist in airborne strategies and special operation tactics, including service as commander in chief of the U.S. Special Operations Command from 1996-1997.

    Among his military awards, he received four Defense Distinguished Service Medals, two Army Distinguished Service Medals, the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star Medal for Valor and the Purple Heart.

    Since he left office and following the Sept. 11 attacks on America, Gen. Shelton has served as a television news commentator for NBC.

  2. #2

    Too bad

    for Gen'l Shelton. Hopefully he regains function.

    This could be, not to sound morbid, beneficial for us as another public person may be able to garner additional attention / progress towards recovery therapies.

    I hate to say it but the reality is that the more 'famous' an injury the greater attention paid.

    Onward and Upward!

  3. #3
    Chris,

    Damn that's cold...but probably accurate

  4. #4
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    i hope you don't really think they will let that man be paralyzed.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    His family needs some time to adjust before going public with anything. But yes, last I heard General Shelton was transferred from Fairfax Hospital where a lot of neck stabilizations are done to Walter Reed's newly reopened rehabilitation ward.

    Four star Shelton was a soldiers' soldier and did a lot for the everyday troop by raising pay more than at anytime since the Carter administration, improved housing and health benefits for all service people. He was special ops all the way and a real not an honorary Green Beret. He survived several wars and then a simple fall from a ladder at home has paralyzed him--hopefully temporarily.

  6. #6

    best case...

    is that the guy becomes an informed voice in the quest for SCI research, whether he walks or not. Worst case is gets well and then proclaims he accomplished the deed through sheer will power and determination.

  7. #7
    Senior Member KLD's Avatar
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    I hope they send him to a good SCI Unit at a VA hospital. I know from experience that Walter Reed is pretty much clueless when it comes to treatment of SCI. Often those who are celebrities don't go to VA hospitals because of the stigma that attends this, but excellent SCI care is available at many of the VA SCI Centers, and he won't not be their first SCI patient (as probably will occur if he stays at Walter Reed).

    I can't tell you how many patients I have had in the last two years who were over 60 and got their SCI falling from ladders at home!!! Please be careful out there guys, and don't let being macho stop you from getting a youger person up the ladder to trim your trees, hang Christmas lights, etc. etc.!!!

  8. #8

    Former top US general injures spine but improving

    Former top US general injures spine but improving

    By Sue Pleming


    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Retired Army Gen. Henry "Hugh" Shelton, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, suffered a serious spinal injury in a fall at his home over the weekend but was showing "some gradual improvement" Tuesday, a hospital statement said.

    Shelton, 60, a tough paratrooper who retired in September as the top U.S. military officer, was in serious but stable condition at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington after falling from a ladder at his Virginia home Saturday.

    "Shelton initially experienced partial paralysis, and is still experiencing weakness in his right leg and both arms, but has shown some gradual improvement," the military hospital said.

    "He has no problems with speech or breathing. He is alert, able to sit and is conversing with the medical staff and with his wife, Carolyn, who is at his bedside," the statement added.

    Defense officials told Reuters that Shelton, a towering man who previously also headed the military's elite Special Operations Command, had fallen from a ladder while pruning a tree at his home near Washington.

    Officials at Walter Reed said Shelton was transferred to the military center on Saturday after initial evaluation at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia.

    One Pentagon official who asked not to be identified said Shelton's medical condition had improved steadily.

    "He keeps himself in very, very good shape," said the official, noting that Shelton was a veteran of hundreds of parachute jumps in a long Army career.

    Known proudly as a "snake eater" with other members of U.S. special forces trained to slog through swamp and jungle on missions, Shelton was JCS chairman from October 1997 to September 2001.

    Before that, he served in the U.S. Army for 34 years as a specialist in airborne strategies and special operations tactics, including service as head of the U.S. Special Operations Command from 1996-1997.

    Among his military awards, he received four Defense Distinguished Service Medals, two Army Distinguished Service Medals, the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star Medal for Valor and the Purple Heart.

    Since he left office and following the Sept. 11 attacks on America, he has served as a television news commentator for NBC.

    17:58 03-26-02

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    KLD, I'm not thrilled with their neurology department but their physical medicine and rehabilitation department is really a lot better just in the 6 or 7 years I've been going there. Among other things they are open to alternative tretments for pain like accupuncture, the docs now do their residencies at facilities like NRH in DC, they have a huge heated therapy pool I wish I lived closer to and an OT department that was the first to make a hand splint I could wear and do its job. They are also participating in trials in different departments other than just malaria vaccines.

    The rooms aren't exactly luxurious and the food is gross but the staff I deal with has been very professional and they sit still and listen to the patient. Now if they could speed up the line at tthe pharmacy.

    There is a good VA hospital across from NRH and near the Old Soldier's Home but it is normally at full capacity with vets injured while on active duty. I know they are blending the 2 groups now but I haven't seen anything from the DC VA yet on if they have started this.

  10. #10
    Senior Member KLD's Avatar
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    Sue, the VA in Washington DC is not a SCI Center. Unfortunately the closest one to DC is either Richmond, VA or all the way to the Bronx in NY. SCI rehab is not to be done at a non-SCI VA hospital by regulation. Glad you have good experiences with Walter Reed. My comments are based more on the acute care that some of our active duty patients got their prior to being transferred to us.

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