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  • Yes, I am more reluctant to fly since Sept. 11th

    6 24.00%
  • No, take me up in the air to my destination!

    19 76.00%
  • 0 0%
  • 0 0%
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Thread: Reluctant to fly the "Friendly" Skies?

  1. #1

    Reluctant to fly the "Friendly" Skies?

    With all the recent "events" that have happened since the tragedies on the 11th of Sept., I'm curious to see how many will be more reluctant to fly in the future.

    Thanks! I haven't made up my mind. I know as a quad, if the plane I was on was hijacked, I think my fear would be triple that if I were an AB. (since I am "stuck" in the bulkhead seat, and I fly have only flown alone as a quad). scary.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
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    If anything, it's safer to fly post-9/11 with the stricter security measures. If we live in fear, the bastards will have won.

    ~Rus

    "Because you're not promised tomorrow." ~ Stuck Mojo

  3. #3
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    To me

    Death can't be more uncomfortable, painful, mentally screwed up as being paralysed. At least when your dead you don't have to use digital stim.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Tara's Avatar
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    I won't fly anyways. What is up with that Washington chair? The few times that I have had to fly, I have ended up in tears from the embarrassment and frustration.

  5. #5
    Originally posted by Tara:

    What is up with that Washington chair? .
    Hi Tara, what do u mean, Washington chair?

  6. #6
    Senior Member KLD's Avatar
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    Air Security for People with Disabilities

    The following statement was issued on 10/29/01 by the Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Aviation Enforcement and Proceedings and its Aviation Consumer Protection Division:

    Recent steps have been taken to ensure new security requirements to preserve and respect the civil rights of disabled people.The Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) and the Department of Transportation's implementing rules prohibit discriminatory treatment of persons with disabilities in air transportation. Since the terrorist hijackings and tragic events of September 11, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued directives to strengthen security measures at airline checkpoints and passenger screening locations.In securing our national air transportation system, where much of FAA's efforts have been directed to date, steps were also taken to ensure that the new security procedures preserve and respect the civil rights of passengers with disabilities.

    This Fact Sheet provides information about the accessibility requirements in air travel in light of strengthened security measures by providing a few examples of the types of accommodations and services that must be provided to passengers with disabilities.The examples listed below are not all-inclusive and are simply meant to provide answers to frequently asked questions since September 11 concerning the air travel of people with disabilities.

    Check-in: Air carriers must provide, meet and assist service (e.g., assistance to gate or aircraft) at drop-off points.The lack of curbside check-in, for certain airlines at some airports, has not changed the requirement for meet and assist service at drop-off points.

    Screener checkpoints:Individuals assisting passengers with disabilities are allowed beyond the screener checkpoints.These individuals may be required to present themselves at the airlines' check-in desk and receive a "pass," allowing them to go through the screener checkpoint without a ticket.

    Ticketed passengers with their own oxygen for use on the ground are allowed beyond the screener checkpoints with their oxygen canisters once the canisters have been thoroughly inspected.If there is a request for oxygen at the gate for a qualified passenger with a disability, commercial oxygen providers are allowed beyond the screener checkpoints with oxygen canisters once the canisters have been thoroughly inspected. Commercial oxygen providers may be required to present themselves at the airlines' check-in desk and receive a "pass" allowing them to go through the screener checkpoint without a ticket.The limit of one carry-on bag and one personal bag (e.g., purse or briefcase) for each traveler does not apply to medical supplies and/or assistive devices.

    Passengers with disabilities generally may carry medical equipment, medications, and assistive devices on board the aircraft.All persons allowed beyond the screener checkpoints may be searched.This will usually be done through the use of a hand-held metal detector, whenever possible.Passengers may also be patted down during security screenings, and this is even more likely if the passenger uses a wheelchair and is unable to stand up. Private screenings remain an option for persons in wheelchairs.

    Service animals, once inspected to ensure prohibited items are not concealed, are permitted on board an aircraft. Any backpack or sidepack that is carried on the animal will be manually inspected or put through the X-ray machines.The service animal's halter may also be removed for inspection. Assistive devices such as walking canes, once inspected to ensure prohibited items are not concealed, are permitted on board an aircraft. Assistive devices, such as augmentative communication devices and Braille'N Speaks, will go through the same sort of security screening process as used for personal computers. Syringes are permitted on board an aircraft once it is determined that the person has a documented medical need for the syringe. Personal wheelchairs and battery-powered scooters may still be used to reach departure gates after they are inspected to ensure that they do not present a security risk. Any backpack or sidepack that is carried on the wheelchair will be manually inspected or put through the X-ray machines.Personal wheelchairs will still be allowed to be stowed on board an aircraft. Air carriers must ensure that qualified individuals with a disability, including those with vision or hearing impairments, have timely access to information, such as new security measures, the carriers provide to other passengers. For example, on flights to Reagan Washington National Airport, persons are verbally warned to use the restrooms more than a half an hour before arrival since after that point in time passengers are required to remain in their seats. Alternative formats are necessary to ensure that all passengers, especially deaf persons, understand new security measures, such as the one at Reagan Washington National.

    We hope this information is helpful to you. Members of the public, who feel they have been the subject of discriminatory actions or treatment by air carriers, may file a complaint by sending an email, a letter, or a completed complaint form to the Aviation Consumer Protection Division (ACPD).

    ACPD's e-mail address is airconsumer@ost.dot.gov and its mailing address is: Aviation Consumer Protection Division, U.S. Department of Transportation, Room 4107, C-75, Washington, DC 20590.Complaint forms that consumers may download and/or print are available at http://www.dot.gov/airconsumer/problems.htm

    Submit questions to: Marcie Roth, Director of Advocacy and Public Policy National Council on Independent Living 1916 Wilson Blvd., Suite 209 Arlington, VA 22201 (703) 525-3406 (V) (703) 525-4153 (TTY) (703) 525-3409 (F)
    marcie@ncil.org (E-mail)
    http://www.ncil.org

  7. #7
    Senior Member Tara's Avatar
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    The Washington Chair is a skinny little seat that you get strapped into and look like hannibal lector or something. There are 2 seatbelt strap things across the chest and lap. I live close to an airport that requires that I transfer out of the wheelchair and am carried up the flight of stairs in front of a window that the other passengers wait in front of. The baggage carriers who carry the chair up the stairs make comments the whole way like "ha ha good thing you are not as heavy as the last guy ha ha" everytime. I realize that it is the only solution that the airport can offer, but I find it incredibly dignity-bashing. And If I have to take a connecting flight........

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jeff's Avatar
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    Tara

    Unless you're on a big plane and get blessed with First Class, they'll strap you in an aisle chair anyway just to get you to your seat. I fly to VT all the time where a number of airlines land out on a runway and you have to be carried down the stairs instead of just out the door of the plane. It does make it worse. But it's worth it if you're visiting loved ones!

    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

  9. #9

    ok

    Nice article kld

    Yea we call them, aisle chairs. they dont know the first thing about using them lol, and esp for ppl who have no control over legs

    is Washington chair a Canadian thing?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Tara:

    The Washington Chair is a skinny little seat that you get strapped into and look like hannibal lector or something.
    I've never heard it called that but I know what you mean. I've heard 'aisle chair' and 'straight back.' I've often referred to myself as Hannibal Lector while being wheeled to my seat. I understand your embarrassment, but if adults stare, they're being rude and you can't tell them to piss off. Kids are ok cuz they stare anyway.

    But you do what's comfortable for you, Tara. We all have our own dignity thresholds. Going up those stairs can be downright scary!

    If you fly Southwest Airlines, you can wheel your own wheelchair right up to the first seat. (assuming you don't have a huge chair) Southwest doesn't have first-class and people choose their seats as they get on. The customer service is great with Southwest too.

    ~Rus

    "Because you're not promised tomorrow." ~ Stuck Mojo

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