Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 26 of 26

Thread: Bankrolling Myself

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by PN View Post
    Yes, you can keep your Medicare, but you will need to drop Part A. If I drop Part A, I will be on the hook for all of my medical expenses going back more than a quarter of a century. This was just confirmed in a phone call with Betty Smith at the Medicare Office. My understanding is that you will then be left with Part B. I would be better off waiting until I turn 65.
    That's quite strange. This link suggests otherwise https://www.medicare.gov/manage-your-health/i-have-a-disability/getting-medicare-if-you-have-a-disability

    "I’m under 65 and have a disability. I’d like to go back to work. Can I keep my Medicare coverage?
    Yes. You can keep your Medicare coverage for as long as you’re medically disabled. If you return to work, you won't have to pay your Part A premium for the first 8 ? years. After that, you’ll have to pay the Part A premium.
    If you can't afford the Part A premium, you may be able to get help from your state. You may be eligible for the Medicare Savings Program called the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program, which is a state program that helps pay Part A premiums, Part B premiums, and other cost-sharing (like deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments) for people who have Part A and limited income and resources."


    I'm certainly no expert, but I've never heard of Medicare part A coverage expiring and you suddenly owing for everything they covered. That seems pretty bizarre. The link would suggest that even your part A premium should be free for 8.5 years.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    "I?m under 65 and have a disability. I?d like to go back to work. Can I keep my Medicare coverage?
    [/URL] Yes. You can keep your Medicare coverage for as long as you?re medically disabled. If you return to work, you won't have to pay your Part A premium for the first 8 ? years. After that, you?ll have to pay the Part A premium.
    If you can't afford the Part A premium, you may be able to get help from your state. You may be eligible for the Medicare Savings Program called the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program, which is a state program that helps pay Part A premiums, Part B premiums, and other cost-sharing (like deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments) for people who have Part A and limited income and resources."
    Perhaps one may not qualify if their net worth is 7 figures. The representative at Medicare who I spoke with yesterday is also singing a different tune (reimbursement my medical expenses).
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
    --General George Patton

    Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
    ––Paul Nussbaum
    usc87.blogspot.com

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by PN View Post
    Perhaps one may not qualify if their net worth is 7 figures. The representative at Medicare who I spoke with yesterday is also singing a different tune (reimbursement my medical expenses).
    I'm fairly certain there are zero income or net worth limits on medicare. Certainly you can lose medicaid (which may be paying part or all of your premiums in some states, not sure about california) if your income or assets are too high, and you will eventually (after nine months of SGA) lose Social Security Disability payments if you are working (there is also no net worth limit to receive social security disability), but I've never heard of anyone losing medicare because they have too much money. There are billionaires who qualify for medicare. You have a slightly higher premium depending on your income, but you're not kicked out of the system.

    As I said I'm no expert, but it certainly sounds like you're not being given accurate information. Might be worth seeking professional advice since this is a big decision. Obviously you're getting some misinformation from the social security office, I'm not sure whom you would turn to for accurate information. Perhaps a disability lawyer would be somewhat familiar with the system?
    Last edited by funklab; 01-31-2020 at 05:48 PM.

  4. #24
    Another thought.

    Are you sure the person you were speaking too wasn't misunderstanding and telling you that you wouldn't qualify for Medi-Cal when you were asking about Medicare instead? I'm sure Medi-Cal has an income and asset limit.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    Another thought.

    Are you sure the person you were speaking too wasn't misunderstanding and telling you that you wouldn't qualify for Medi-Cal when you were asking about Medicare instead? I'm sure Medi-Cal has an income and asset limit.
    Definitely Medicare not Medi-Cal. I spoke with an ADA attorney yesterday. He recommended that I call Medicare.
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
    --General George Patton

    Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
    ––Paul Nussbaum
    usc87.blogspot.com

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by PN View Post
    Definitely Medicare not Medi-Cal. I spoke with an ADA attorney yesterday. He recommended that I call Medicare.
    Hopefully you don't get Betty Smith on the phone again.

    Let us know how it turns out!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •