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Thread: Scientists Discover Molecular Switch That Can Help Repair Damaged Nervous System

  1. #1
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    Scientists Discover Molecular Switch That Can Help Repair Damaged Nervous System

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  2. #2
    Cool! I wish I knew what the drug is and what it's prescribed for.....



  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by FellowHawkeye View Post
    Cool! I wish I knew what the drug is and what it's prescribed for.....
    Found out. MS researchers have already started animal trials. https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.c...tudy-suggests/

  4. #4
    Please be careful taking it; it might lead to bleeding if you take too much

  5. #5
    Oh I didn't think I could be prescribed it and if I could it would be a low dose.

  6. #6
    I researched aspirin on wikipedia and found this: Low-dose aspirin use irreversibly blocks the formation of thromboxane A2 in platelets, producing an inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation during the lifetime of the affected platelet (8–9 days). This antithrombotic property makes aspirin useful for reducing the incidence of heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack, unstable angina, ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack.[142] 40 mg of aspirin a day is able to inhibit a large proportion of maximum thromboxane A2 release provoked acutely, with the prostaglandin I2 synthesis being little affected; however, higher doses of aspirin are required to attain further inhibition.[143]

    So I don't know if thromboxane is very similar to thrombin, but both prevent formation of platelets, it looks like. Would aspirin, which wasn't studied, be as effective as pradaxa???? Might be safer?

  7. #7
    I use Apixaban (Eliquiss), another NAO like Pradaxa. No noticeable improvement after one year.
    T4 AIS A since 07/05/2017

    "We lie the best when we lie to ourselves."

  8. #8
    I believe, that Aspirin and Eliquiss inhibit both different targets. And maybe it is not the blood clotting that needs to be inhibited. Potentially thrombin acts in other pathways as well ... just speculating here
    As difficult as it is; I would give science a few more years here

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