Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Manufactured Homes - Can you remodel them?

  1. #1

    Manufactured Homes - Can you remodel them?

    So I have been looking for a place to retire to, and a house with 30+acres has fallen my way. My question is - it has a manufactured house (mobile home on a foundation) on it, and would need to be modified for handicap accessibility.

    Can this be done with these homes? The ramps and doors shouldn't be any problem, but the bathrooms and kitchen would need work.
    Anybody else live in a manufactured house or have had their house modified without any issues?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    3,940
    Blog Entries
    1
    Manufacture home and "mobile home with a foundation" are very different things. Manufactured homes are built like any other just mostly off premises then assembled on site in large sections. They can be modified like any other. Mobile homes are built on trailer beds and have different foundations and construction code from interior walls and ceilings and such.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    middle georgia
    Posts
    2,580
    agre with oddity but u should be able to modify whaat you need with those manufactured beams and reconfigure door way bathroom if you nee a roll in shower you could retile or you use a dumawall interlocking tile lots of opportunities
    show picture go for it

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    Manufacture home and "mobile home with a foundation" are very different things. Manufactured homes are built like any other just mostly off premises then assembled on site in large sections. They can be modified like any other. Mobile homes are built on trailer beds and have different foundations and construction code from interior walls and ceilings and such.
    OK- Thanks Oddity - Looked like a trailer w/o wheels to me.

    vjls - you are correct with the modifications. Have talked with 3 different contractors, and all say the same thing; the bathrooms in these houses can be modified, but can be tricky. What I also learned is that these houses are pretty expensive on the electricity. Not sure if its the way its floor plan is spread out, or if the structures have a lot of drafts.
    I'm thinking of having an energy audit done to get a better idea of what cash I gotta put out to make this home comfy.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    middle georgia
    Posts
    2,580
    Quote Originally Posted by graybeard View Post
    OK- Thanks Oddity - Looked like a trailer w/o wheels to me.

    vjls - you are correct with the modifications. Have talked with 3 different contractors, and all say the same thing; the bathrooms in these houses can be modified, but can be tricky. What I also learned is that these houses are pretty expensive on the electricity. Not sure if its the way its floor plan is spread out, or if the structures have a lot of drafts.
    I'm thinking of having an energy audit done to get a better idea of what cash I gotta put out to make this home comfy.
    I live in a modular years ago its was 6 inch walls I had the bottom of it surround by straw bales so wind could not get under. engry audit smart idea also u can get 1 of those thing u point at wall and ceiling and it well tell u hot cold spot u can get them at hd or lowes insulation and windows are always good ideas along with a good heating and cooling.

    keep us in loop I love remodeling homes everyone I have ever lived in redid


    BLACK+DECKER TLD100 Thermal Leak Detector
    by BLACK+DECKER
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,775 ratings
    | 113 answered questions
    Amazon's Choice for "camera detector"
    Was: $30.88
    Price: $29.42 & FREE Shipping. Details & FREE Returns
    You Save: $1.46 (5%)
    Get $100 off instantly: Pay $0.00 upon approval for the Amazon.com Store Card.
    Note: Available at a lower price from other sellers that may not offer free Prime shipping.
    Free Amazon tech support included

    Uses infrared sensors to measure surface temperatures
    Helps homeowners track down power-draining drafts
    Sold with a 5-step guide to fixing basic energy leaks and comes with the thermal leak detector
    Plugging leaks can save up to 20 percent on heating and cooling costs
    Backed by a two-year warranty

    › See more product details
    Compare with similar items
    New & Used (28) from $27.07 + FREE Shipping
    Report incorrect product inform

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by graybeard View Post
    OK- Thanks Oddity - Looked like a trailer w/o wheels to me.

    vjls - you are correct with the modifications. Have talked with 3 different contractors, and all say the same thing; the bathrooms in these houses can be modified, but can be tricky. What I also learned is that these houses are pretty expensive on the electricity. Not sure if its the way its floor plan is spread out, or if the structures have a lot of drafts.
    I'm thinking of having an energy audit done to get a better idea of what cash I gotta put out to make this home comfy.
    If it has electric heat it going to be expensive, as it's the highest cost per BTU there is.

  7. #7
    I live in a modular years ago its was 6 inch walls I had the bottom of it surround by straw bales so wind could not get under. engry audit smart idea also u can get 1 of those thing u point at wall and ceiling and it well tell u hot cold spot u can get them at hd or lowes insulation and windows are always good ideas along with a good heating and cooling.

    keep us in loop I love remodeling homes everyone I have ever lived in redid

    Yeah vljs - thank you for the response. I do have one of those handheld heat source detectors. Am sure the energy audit folks will cart around an upgraded model compared to the one I use.

    Rusty James - Oh yeah brother! I found out quickly how 'spensive that electric heat can be! I use a woodstove now to keep the electric bill down. This house has a fireplace, which I am not a fan of. However the masonry of the chimney doesn't allow for a woodstove to be used, and the firebox is really small for the fireplace. Almost an entertainment atmosphere use than heat source.
    Last edited by graybeard; 01-15-2020 at 08:21 PM.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by graybeard View Post
    I live in a modular years ago its was 6 inch walls I had the bottom of it surround by straw bales so wind could not get under. engry audit smart idea also u can get 1 of those thing u point at wall and ceiling and it well tell u hot cold spot u can get them at hd or lowes insulation and windows are always good ideas along with a good heating and cooling.

    keep us in loop I love remodeling homes everyone I have ever lived in redid

    Yeah vljs - thank you for the response. I do have one of those handheld heat source detectors. Am sure the energy audit folks will cart around an upgraded model compared to the one I use.

    Rusty James - Oh yeah brother! I found out quickly how 'spensive that electric heat can be! I use a woodstove now to keep the electric bill down. This house has a fireplace, which I am not a fan of. However the masonry of the chimney doesn't allow for a woodstove to be used, and the firebox is really small for the fireplace. Almost an entertainment atmosphere use than heat source.
    Not sure what you mean by the masonry chimney not allowing the woodstove use. If there's a code issue with that than you could in most cases slip a stainless steel liner in the flue. Wood burning is a PIA but there's nothing like it when the space doesn't have a tight envelope.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustyjames View Post
    Not sure what you mean by the masonry chimney not allowing the woodstove use. If there's a code issue with that than you could in most cases slip a stainless steel liner in the flue. Wood burning is a PIA but there's nothing like it when the space doesn't have a tight envelope.
    Yeah Rusty - guess I shoulda explained better - The masonry for the fireplace is not very high on the wall. The chimney itself - yes you are correct- a SS sleeve can be placed there for the flue. To use a woodstove, the height of the masonry is currently very low. I realized after posting that the fireplace is actually a gas fireplace. For the woodstove to be used, I would need to extend a floor protector outward maybe 3-4 ft and the pipe from the stove to the thimble would need to be 24" (fire code) if memory serves me. Wish I could remember how to post pics. Would better explain what I 'm trying to say.
    Last edited by graybeard; 01-24-2020 at 11:21 AM.

  10. #10
    Ok Rusty - I think I got the photo figured out:
    This is the gas fireplace: Not sure why the photo is so dinky....


Similar Threads

  1. Kitchen remodel pics
    By vsu in forum Housing and Home Design
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 09-01-2014, 02:29 PM
  2. Need help getting Transfer Board manufactured
    By kmiller7 in forum Equipment
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-10-2008, 12:36 AM
  3. Remodel Pics
    By gpbullock in forum Life
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-18-2004, 06:39 PM
  4. New Para with remodel questions
    By theocrat in forum Housing and Home Design
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-31-2003, 06:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •