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Thread: COG for new TiLIte

  1. #11
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    Raising your casters only will put the front wheels off 90o so would have to adjust the front barrel housing to be 90o .
    Ronnie,
    If you're not familiar with what this means, at the factory they make sure the vertical axis of the fork is perfectly perpendicular to the floor, so when the fork rotates around 360deg the front seat height doesn't change a bit. In addition to feeling a little 'bump' during fork rotation when the caster goes from leading to trailing (the seat height changing a bit), it can also cause caster flutter and premature beating failure (since the pressure isn't even on the fork stem bearings anymore.)

    The manual I linked earlier has detailed instructions on how to square the casters in section 11-6, 7.

    Its kind of a pain in the ass.

    You could avoid the need by simply adjusting the backrest to a more open angle, the angle it would be at if you raised the front using the caster holes. It's not ideal or exactly the same but might be much easier to deal with.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

  2. #12
    Agre with Oddity, Its a pain to adjust the front caster to be the same. Easier to open the bank andgle a bit.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    Raising your casters only will put the front wheels off 90o so would have to adjust the front barrel housing to be 90o .
    I have increased dump by 1/2" without adjusting caster angle. It's not the ideal 90 angle but I didn't find a difference in turning. But I like to keep it 90 degrees just because. Not sure why you call it a pain. On my TRA, it's just loosening a bolt, adjusting the caster angle, and tightening the bolt.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    It depends on the chair. This one might not be too bad. I've always had to break out the carpenter's square and get it up on a table to fiddle with it to get it exact. Eyeballing it is fine I goes but if I'm breaking out tools imma do it as perfect as I can manage. Relative to tweaking the back angle (especially with the new TiLite adjustable hardware) its a pain. (Btw they still haven't updated the manuals with the new backrest hardware. They should. In case they're lurking...hint hint.)
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

  5. #15
    I understand. If the adjustment is infinitesimal then you could spend a lot of time on it if you're a perfectionist. But I don't think it's that way on my chair. if I recall correctly, it's a tooth and groove design. Hence, you select the one position that is closest to 90 degrees. May not be as accurate as if you squared it with a tool. But it's much faster, easier, and probably no significant difference.

    I hit a pothole that sent my fork out of alignment so I have to adjust it back to normal. I'll report back what I find and try to take some pictures if feasible.

  6. #16
    Just adjusted the caster angle. I use a process as follows:

    1. Estimate by eye where the fork will be perpendicular to the floor.
    2. I sit in my sofa seat with the chair on it's back, loosen the caster using an allen wrench (see attached picture), adjust the angle, and tighten the allen wrench.
    3. Place the chair right side up on a flat floor and swivel the front end back and forth. Both casters should touch the floor at all times. If not, either your floor isn't perfectly flat or the casters are not aligned.
    4. Swivel the front end back and forth again. Verify that the front end swivels freely. If it's out of alignment, you may feels spots of resistance and/or spots of lifting up or dipping down while turning.


    If the chair passes tests in steps 3 and 4, then the chair is aligned. Otherwise, repeat steps 1 - 4. Each iteration takes about 1 minute.

    There is no tooth and groove. The adjustment is infinitesimal. But no big deal. It's a fast process. Takes me much longer to take the axles out of the casters to remove the dog hair than it does to adjust the angle.

    Putting the chair up on a table to use a square may be more precise. But, I could go through several iterations of trial and error to get the same result much faster with less resources, effort, and frustration.
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    Last edited by August West; 01-12-2020 at 03:57 PM.

  7. #17
    Senior Member pfcs49's Avatar
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    nice fan
    69yo male T12 complete since 1995
    NW NJ

  8. #18
    Was about to crop the fan out of the picture. But couldn't get myself to do it.

  9. #19
    Senior Member pfcs49's Avatar
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    I didn't have AC in any house until 1993.
    So I collected antique electric fans. I love that early industrial look they have, and with a good cord and some lubrication, they will run 80 years! It WAS a practical pursuit.
    Now, they're all in the basement...excepting 3 or 4 in the garage.
    I'd love someone to take them and I hear they actually have good value. I guess that shows everything is not yet corrupt in our country!
    69yo male T12 complete since 1995
    NW NJ

  10. #20
    Fans are an underestimated asset. They keep you healthy and comfy and pay for themselves. I keep my furnace fan on 24/7. It helps to keep the house less dusty and eliminate pathogens. I believe this is even more important for my dog than me. Because the dog is close to the ground where more pathogens can settle and accumulate. The ceiling fans reduce air conditioning usage and feel great all year. The tabletop fan helps to keep the house cool and fresh while cooking.

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