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Thread: Msra ? vre ? esbl

  1. #1
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    Msra ? vre ? esbl

    I am thankful that my recent adventures in acronyms are not what prompts this pose (I think I beat my RSV and pneumonia and may post about that separately), but I am curious about the nasty guys in the title bar. Are they:
    = urinary or whole body or some other kind of infection?
    = how often antibiotic resistant?
    = Usually acquired in the facility?
    = Deadly when antibiotic resistant?
    = Likely due to lackluster care and avoidable
    with the most hygienic care?
    Last edited by Random; 01-05-2020 at 07:21 PM.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Random View Post
    I am thankful that my recent adventures in acronyms are not what prompts this pose (I think I beat my RSV and pneumonia and may post about that separately), but I am curious about the nasty guys in the title bar. Are they:
    Quote Originally Posted by Random View Post
    = urinary or whole body or some other kind of infection?
    Most of these drug resistant "superbugs" can cause urinary tract infections, wound infections, lung infections (pneumonia), and septicemia (blood born) infections.

    Quote Originally Posted by Random View Post
    = how often antibiotic resistant?
    By definition, these superbugs have developed resistance to some or all antibiotics, and it also varies by the specific strain of that bacteria.







    • ESBL = enterobacteriaceae (such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Klebsiella pneumoniae) which also produce an enzyme called extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) which breaks down many common antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins.
    • https://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/ESBL.html





    Quote Originally Posted by Random View Post
    = Usually acquired in the facility?
    MRSA is more and more being acquired in the community, by exposure of broken skin to others with the infection, or from contaminated water such as in hot tubs, but it is also commonly acquired in health care facilities which do not screen all admissions for it, and isolate those who test positive.
    The other infections above are most commonly acquired in health care facilities, either by transmission, or by conversion of bacteria after prolonged treatment with antibiotics such as occurs in patients in the ICU, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Random View Post
    = Deadly when antibiotic resistant?
    Not necessarily, but they require "big gun" antibiotics for treatment if an infection develops, and run a much higher risk for septicemia and even death than infections with bacteria that are not highly drug resistant. Keep in mind that some people can be colonized with germs like MRSA and not get sick themselves, but can pass it on to others. Many health care professionals are chronically colonized in their nasal passages with MRSA.

    Quote Originally Posted by Random View Post
    = Likely due to lackluster care and avoidable with the most hygienic care?
    All of these bacteria above are transmitted by touch, so yes, poor hand hygiene can be a significant factor in transmission by caregivers or other people/patients with who are infected or colonized by these bacteria. Some can also be transmitted by inadaquate cleaning of surfaces such as side rails, toilets, sinks, overbed tables, etc. MRSA, for example, can remain on such surfaces for months and be transmitted by touching these surfaces. Acinetobacter can be in the soil, and can be acquired with dirty wounds such as occur in battleground injuries, or trauma where soil contaminates a wound. It also has the nasty ability to transmit it's drug resistance to other bacteria by plasmid transfer.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
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    Thank you so much kLD for your incredibly thorough answer. I am sorry for my clueless start, but I have not a question remaining.

  4. #4
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    Although I do return to wonder how the race survives against this onslaught. Is it just that most healthy people can just fight it off without knowing it?

  5. #5
    We created this situation with inappropriate use of antibiotics since the 1940s. Some may have had sub-clinical infections (with no symptoms), but most of these bugs developed in health care facilities, and have spread into the community by health care workers and patients discharged from the hospital when still colonized by these bacteria.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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