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Thread: Fractured tibia

  1. #11
    I didn't think you could live link a product...bought mine from the company..

    http://www.bledsoebrace.com/products/original-knee/

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by airart1 View Post
    I didn't think you could live link a product...bought mine from the company..

    http://www.bledsoebrace.com/products/original-knee/
    no leg braces there. thanks
    Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

  3. #13
    I got the findings online of the xrays. The one of the ankle area:

    FINDINGS:There is a mildly displaced spiral fracture through the distal tibial
    diaphysis. The bones are demineralized. Distal fibula appears intact.
    Severe degenerative changes are present at the tibiotalar joint.

    IMPRESSION:
    1. Mildly displaced spiral fracture through the distal tibial diaphysis.


    The tibia-fibula xray

    FINDINGS:
    Oblique fracture of the distal tibial shaft is appreciated. The fibula is
    intact. The medial and lateral malleoli are unremarkable. The proximal
    fibular shaft shows a nondisplaced fracture. Joint spaces are preserved.

    IMPRESSION:
    1. Proximal fibular fracture with distal tibial oblique fracture. Alignment
    is near anatomic.


    What's with the mild in the first one but "appreciated" in the 2nd? Is it bad sounding?
    Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by leschinsky View Post
    I got the findings online of the xrays. The one of the ankle area:

    FINDINGS:There is a mildly displaced spiral fracture through the distal tibial
    diaphysis. The bones are demineralized. Distal fibula appears intact.
    Severe degenerative changes are present at the tibiotalar joint.

    IMPRESSION:
    1. Mildly displaced spiral fracture through the distal tibial diaphysis.


    The tibia-fibula xray

    FINDINGS:
    Oblique fracture of the distal tibial shaft is appreciated. The fibula is
    intact. The medial and lateral malleoli are unremarkable. The proximal
    fibular shaft shows a nondisplaced fracture. Joint spaces are preserved.

    IMPRESSION:
    1. Proximal fibular fracture with distal tibial oblique fracture. Alignment
    is near anatomic.


    What's with the mild in the first one but "appreciated" in the 2nd? Is it bad sounding?
    I'm no expert but my interpretation of "appreciated" means that the mild fracture is noted. It is just restating what has already been said. The words "near anatomic" might be a good thing, almost the same as being nondisplaced, but not quite. My fractures were nondisplaced. That is good in the sense that it did not require surgery, but still very fragile. Any movement or pressure could make the bones move. You have to be very careful about moving your leg at all while it is healing.
    Last edited by Sugarcube; 12-09-2019 at 01:37 PM.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Sugarcube View Post
    I'm no expert but my interpretation of "appreciated" means that the mild fracture is noted. It is just restating what has already been said. The words "near anatomic" might be a good thing, almost the same as being nondisplaced, but not quite. My fractures were nondisplaced. That is good in the sense that it did not require surgery, but still very fragile. Any movement or pressure could make the bones move. You have to be very careful about moving your leg at all while it is healing.
    Thanks.

    I met with the ortho surgeon. Luckily he had experience with SCI people and his main concern too was pressure sores. So he recommended a titanium rod and I agreed. 6-12 weeks of being with a cast would be just too difficult.
    Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

  6. #16
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
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    I have had both leg breaks two years apart. Both were mildly displaced spiral fractures, The surgeon didn't feel there was enough bone mass and growth to do rods and pins (plus the risks associated with surgery). The first had both bones severed, the second was mostly the tibia. The first took 6 moths in lower leg hard cast (there is no way I could manage life in a full leg cast). I went in every 2 weeks to have cast changed and skin inspected. Since there was no signs of skin issues developing, we, eventually, went to every 3 weeks. The second was accompanied by bone density scans and osteo consult. Started off with same cast procedure of two week changes. Osteo consult eventually concluded no intervention, other than taking calcium/vitamin D, since nothing currently seems effective for SCI to build bone mass. Anyway, after 5 months, I notified my doctor of a desire to sail in a regatta where my cast might get wet. He came up with the idea of getting a molded splint (I am pretty sure it was an AFO, also known as a CROW boot) made by the prosthetics guys. It was expensive, $2000 retail. They came in and took a cast of my leg to use as a mold and built a clamshell style plastic splint that pretty much was as good as a cast at immobilizing. It was waterproof and could be removed whenever I wanted. The only downside was that it didn't breath (prosthetic guy said that they can't put in air holes because the skin would push into the holes, creating pressure points), so I had to wear a sock and change it every few days. Maybe this isn't a big deal for you all, but in Hawaii, I don't EVER wear shoes, and so putting on socks is a huge PITA. Anyway, it took a total of 9 months in the cast/splint to get to about 90% healed and being able to go without. While living in the cast for that long isn't pleasant, it isn't difficult, either. I sat sideways on my shower bench, or wore a cast protector when I felt like more immersion. Sleeping was probably the most annoying, as the weight of the cast forces one to be more cautious when turning, and I always had to keep the cast leg outside of the sheets. Now both legs are slightly longer and immeasurably offset (I am guessing the bones were both separated and displaced by about 1/8 - 1/4 inch.

    Anyway, good luck with the surgery, I hope it is successful at keeping you out of a cast.
    Last edited by Kulea; 12-09-2019 at 08:57 PM.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by leschinsky View Post
    I met with the ortho surgeon. Luckily he had experience with SCI people and his main concern too was pressure sores. So he recommended a titanium rod and I agreed. 6-12 weeks of being with a cast would be just too difficult.
    This is the same route I went down after six weeks of wearing a cast and no bone knitting whatsoever. I had a spiral fracture of the tibia and the fibula was broken. I'm a complete injury also and 34 years post. Even though the doctor said my bones were demineralised everything went very well and I have had no issues whatsoever. During the insertion of the tibial or intramedullary nail the surgeon kept saying how soft the bones were and had trouble feeling when the screws went through. Took about two hours and had an spinal anaesthesia with 24 hours of fentanyl using a bolus when needed. So as soon the blood pressure started to rise the fentanyl was released by a nurse, unfortunately no high but it certainly worked lowering the blood pressure. One of the main concerns they had was compartment syndrome postoperation.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by leschinsky View Post
    Thanks.

    I met with the ortho surgeon. Luckily he had experience with SCI people and his main concern too was pressure sores. So he recommended a titanium rod and I agreed. 6-12 weeks of being with a cast would be just too difficult.
    Wow. I am shocked by this, considering your osteoporosis and the fact that you won't be standing on it. How long will it take to heal with the rod? What is being done about the fracture in your fibula? I'm not second guessing your doctor, just genuinely curious.

    I wish you the best of outcomes possible.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by takenaback View Post
    This is the same route I went down after six weeks of wearing a cast and no bone knitting whatsoever. I had a spiral fracture of the tibia and the fibula was broken. I'm a complete injury also and 34 years post. Even though the doctor said my bones were demineralised everything went very well and I have had no issues whatsoever. During the insertion of the tibial or intramedullary nail the surgeon kept saying how soft the bones were and had trouble feeling when the screws went through. Took about two hours and had an spinal anaesthesia with 24 hours of fentanyl using a bolus when needed. So as soon the blood pressure started to rise the fentanyl was released by a nurse, unfortunately no high but it certainly worked lowering the blood pressure. One of the main concerns they had was compartment syndrome postoperation.
    oh thank god a good story. what did you wear after surgery?

    sugacube I believe he said 3 weeks with some kind of soft boot after surgery. He said the fibula would heal on it's own. This guy did a fellowship at Cornell, the top rated Ortho hosp so I'm going to hope he knows what he's doing. He was surprised I thought surgery wouldnt work.

    kulea that sounds like quite an ordeal!
    Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by leschinsky View Post
    oh thank god a good story. what did you wear after surgery?

    sugacube I believe he said 3 weeks with some kind of soft boot after surgery. He said the fibula would heal on it's own. This guy did a fellowship at Cornell, the top rated Ortho hosp so I'm going to hope he knows what he's doing. He was surprised I thought surgery wouldnt work.

    kulea that sounds like quite an ordeal!
    I use Prevalon boots in bed every night for heel pressure reduction but turns out they are really good post surgery for a tibial nail, at least for me. The surgeons weren't at all concerned about the fibula and as they said "not a weight-bearing bone". Probably not a concern for someone who is paralysed but I suspect the same would not apply to able-bodied people. I was also told by the surgeon even though my bones are soft they are not eggshells like older people. I can only repeat what I was told.

    I took the boots to hospital as well as they are a fantastic place for pressure injuries.

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