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Thread: oxybutynin and i.d. catheter

  1. #1

    oxybutynin and i.d. catheter

    I just started using oxybutynin for the purpose of helping relieve head sweating. My urologist never replied to my letter. I asked if it would be safe and contact my GP with dosage. He never did so I went to my neurologist, he said it shouldn't be a problem. Well I took 10mg and it seems it kicked in at the 4 hour mark (dry mouth). It seem to help with the head sweating at about that time. I didn't have to be reclined in my chair. So my question is this safe, it seems like I retained more urine that day.
    Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
    Bob Seger

  2. #2
    Have you had urodynamics recently? While anticholenergics can decrease your bladder emptying/spasm pressures (and thus, problems with AD), they are also used to prevent incontinence in those using intermittent cath or leakage around catheters for those with indwelling catheters, so if you are still trying to use reflex voiding as your bladder management method, this may be a problem.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Have you had urodynamics recently? While anticholenergics can decrease your bladder emptying/spasm pressures (and thus, problems with AD), they are also used to prevent incontinence in those using intermittent cath or leakage around catheters for those with indwelling catheters, so if you are still trying to use reflex voiding as your bladder management method, this may be a problem.

    (KLD)

    Does the same hold true if my bladder muscles are shot? That's why I had to go with the I.D.
    Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
    Bob Seger

  4. #4
    So are you saying your catheter is not draining, or you are making less urine daily? I am confused.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    So are you saying your catheter is not draining, or you are making less urine daily? I am confused.

    (KLD)
    Sorry about the confusion. Here is the lowdown. I was diagnosed with autonomic dysfunction. I just tried the Oxycontin only once Saturday with fair results. Been in bed since. My poor sick PCA. Have another cigarette ahole!

    I think I might of retained a little more urine than normal, not sure as you know there are variables like humidity etc. When I visited my neurologist I told him I got an appointment at Yale neurologist for December 5th and said to him, I figured how much more can they know then you. His reply, a lot make sure you go.
    Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
    Bob Seger

  6. #6
    Have you never had any AD symptoms before? Most people with a cervical SCI/D are at risk for autonomic dysreflexia, and most also have other types of autonomic dysfunction. It goes along with SCI/D.

    Anticholenergics may decrease AD symptoms due to bladder spasm and high pressures, but should not cause urinary retention or reduction of urine production in someone with an indwelling catheter.

    Have you been screened for stones (bladder, ureters, kidney)? Had a recent cystoscopy? How long have you been using an indwelling catheter?

    Sounds like you need to see a good neurologic urologist rather than a neurologist.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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