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Thread: Adaptive skiing question

  1. #1
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Adaptive skiing question

    Hi all, prior to my injury 25+ years ago, I was an avid skier. Since then I?ve been tempted by the thought of trying adaptive skiing, though as a C4/5 complete, I realize would be limited to be tethered on a sit ski. Anyway, I am hoping to visit friends in Denver either this winter or next. In planning, I also saw Amtrak has a ski train that runs from Denver to Winter Park, which I understand has an excellent adaptive ski program. So a few questions/concerns:

    1. Falling. I imagine sit skis are relatively stable, especially when tethered, but I?d be concerned about hard falls onto my shoulders.

    2. What to wear. Obviously in my skiing days I invested in all the gear, but now, for a likely one time experience, what clothing would need to be purchased, and do the adaptive centers provide any of these: snow pants, boots (or do we wear regular sneakers)?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by landrover View Post
    Hi all, prior to my injury 25+ years ago, I was an avid skier. Since then I?ve been tempted by the thought of trying adaptive skiing, though as a C4/5 complete, I realize would be limited to be tethered on a sit ski. Anyway, I am hoping to visit friends in Denver either this winter or next. In planning, I also saw Amtrak has a ski train that runs from Denver to Winter Park, which I understand has an excellent adaptive ski program. So a few questions/concerns:

    1. Falling. I imagine sit skis are relatively stable, especially when tethered, but I?d be concerned about hard falls onto my shoulders.

    2. What to wear. Obviously in my skiing days I invested in all the gear, but now, for a likely one time experience, what clothing would need to be purchased, and do the adaptive centers provide any of these: snow pants, boots (or do we wear regular sneakers)?
    I went to brickridge call them they have a program at breckridge they had clothing outer for us. I fell side way a couple of times no biggy but dang it was fun. call and ask

  3. #3
    Hi
    The PA Center for Adapted Sports offers skiing in the poconos. There office is in Phili.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by landrover View Post
    Hi all, prior to my injury 25+ years ago, I was an avid skier. Since then I?ve been tempted by the thought of trying adaptive skiing, though as a C4/5 complete, I realize would be limited to be tethered on a sit ski. Anyway, I am hoping to visit friends in Denver either this winter or next. In planning, I also saw Amtrak has a ski train that runs from Denver to Winter Park, which I understand has an excellent adaptive ski program. So a few questions/concerns:

    1. Falling. I imagine sit skis are relatively stable, especially when tethered, but I?d be concerned about hard falls onto my shoulders.

    2. What to wear. Obviously in my skiing days I invested in all the gear, but now, for a likely one time experience, what clothing would need to be purchased, and do the adaptive centers provide any of these: snow pants, boots (or do we wear regular sneakers)?
    #1 - the sit-ski they'll most likely put you in will be very stable and they may even add a set of outriggers to it, which would eliminate completely tipping over. As you said, you'll also be tethered. They'll ask how your shoulders are and once informed that they are a point of concern for you will diligently make sure you don't incur more weight/impact than what's safe/smart. Working with the instructors at Winter Park and Breckenridge (and Crested Butte... another option not too too far from Denver), in my experience, feels more like working with actual PTs rather than ski-bums. Short answer: you'll definitely feel it in your shoulders, but if a complete tip over or a hard carve is going to be problematic, your instructors will be all over it.

    #2 - I've always had my own gear, but I know for a fact that Winter Park provides adaptive mittens that unzip all the way to the top, making it easy to stuff my clubs in there. You definitely want boots, not sneakers. I don't imagine they provide boots or pants, but I'm not positive. If you absolutely have no way to get a hold of a pair of warm, waterproof boots of some sort, you can probably convince them to throw you into a regular ski boot... which they do provide for adaptive stand-up skiers.


    You'd be wise to take the train to Winter Park as the traffic up to the mountains can be insane... especially on the weekends. The drive to Winter Park is not as bad as the drive to Breckenridge, but it can still be a beast. As Vjls said, give them a call and ask whatever you want. They're all super-nice, helpful and patient. The whole thing is a fantastic experience - go for it and have a blast!!

    *************************************************************
    *** c4/c5 incomplete *** Injured in Summer 2003 ***
    *************************************************************

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