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Thread: Off-Road Or "Beefed-up" Casters?

  1. #11
    If I go more than 4" casters, they will hit my feet while turning. They will also be more apt to hit the wall and furniture. Hence, if I were to go large on the casters, it would have to be custom for outdoors. Maybe you don't have that problem. But it's a consideration.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    If I go more than 4" casters, they will hit my feet while turning. They will also be more apt to hit the wall and furniture. Hence, if I were to go large on the casters, it would have to be custom for outdoors. Maybe you don't have that problem. But it's a consideration.
    That is right along the line that I was trying to explain. We are on the same page. Big wheels outside, small inside, different chairs, different geometries. The I-Glide with the big wheels gets me from the stair elevator and out the front door and that is about it. Otherwise it is dang clumsy inside.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by ProPulse View Post
    @baldfatdad I wish that they kept the quick release casters on the modern chairs!! :,(
    When the chairs went to narrower/shorter frames, that took away to room for big front wheels. Then when Tilite put their front casters on wings outside the frame it made it even worse. Now people have to "ad on" front wheels to leave, flat level surfaces. It must be fine with most people.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by baldfatdad View Post
    When the chairs went to narrower/shorter frames, that took away to room for big front wheels. Then when Tilite put their front casters on wings outside the frame it made it even worse. Now people have to "ad on" front wheels to leave, flat level surfaces. It must be fine with most people.
    I'm not most people, but it's definitely fine with me!

    Everyday I'm thankful my 13" chair (just under 22" wide at the widest point of the handrims with 2 degrees of camber) can go through a 24" door. I can deal with the inconvenience of needing to wheelie if I need to go off of the pavement for a little while, but 99% of my life is lived in places where narrowness is crucial and bigger front casters are nothing but inconvenient. I think the freewheel is a genius invention... though to be fair I have yet to get myself one.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by baldfatdad View Post
    Quickies in the 80-90's had quick release caster stems on the chairs. I had a chair with a set of 4 inch wheels and forks and 8 inch wheels and forks.
    A manual wheelchair that can accept a 4" caster as well as an 8" caster has to be large, heavy, and hard to maneuver. Big price to pay.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    A manual wheelchair that can accept a 4" caster as well as an 8" caster has to be large, heavy, and hard to maneuver. Big price to pay.
    This is not true. I am still in my 1983 Quickie 2. It weighs 24 lbs with cushion and air in the tires. I can put casters wheels on from 3 inch to 8 inch. Its a 16x16 seat chair. I don't have a tape with me, but its not more than 24 inches wide. And back in the day, I played basketball in it and did obstacle courses.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by nonoise View Post
    IMO you cannot rebuild the chairs to fit oversize casters. In most cases not even 6X1.25 inch could be used even it they fit due to often fixed dump and caster steering axle angle. My TiLite ZR has 5 inch solid casters which I cannot improve. When I put it back in service with a power add-on I will use the add-on with a Free Wheel.
    I see, so the best solution that you've found so far is pretty much the freewheel. It would work really well with PropPulse. I just wish there was a cheaper way that wouldn't make the wheelchairs footprint so much large.

    One more question. Let's assume we sell the power assist as is and the user has "normal" sized casters. If you are holding a joystick (like the one below) with one hand, is it possible to still wheelie over an obstacle?

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    If I go more than 4" casters, they will hit my feet while turning. They will also be more apt to hit the wall and furniture. Hence, if I were to go large on the casters, it would have to be custom for outdoors. Maybe you don't have that problem. But it's a consideration.
    That makes sense. Do you have any suggestions for us and trying to make our power add on safe when you have to go over a large crack in the pavement? Or is the answer simply to just avoid them at all costs?

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by ProPulse View Post
    I see, so the best solution that you've found so far is pretty much the freewheel. It would work really well with PropPulse. I just wish there was a cheaper way that wouldn't make the wheelchairs footprint so much large.

    One more question. Let's assume we sell the power assist as is and the user has "normal" sized casters. If you are holding a joystick (like the one below) with one hand, is it possible to still wheelie over an obstacle?
    You are asking about a one handed wheelie. Seems to me that would cause one to turn in circles. So the joystick would have to compensate for the other push. I think the learning curve is too steep for me to do it without turning if at all. August probably can.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProPulse View Post
    One more question. Let's assume we sell the power assist as is and the user has "normal" sized casters. If you are holding a joystick (like the one below) with one hand, is it possible to still wheelie over an obstacle?
    It may be possible for a small percentage of wheelchair users, but if you are relying on this ability to be able to use your device safely, then you won’t be selling many!
    Gordon, father of son who became t6 paraplegic at the age of 4 in 2007 as a result of surgery to remove a spinal tumour.

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