Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Manual chair for c4/5 quad?

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southeast, USA
    Posts
    631
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Believe it or not, many nursing homes will not allow residents to use a power chair; they say they fear that other residents will be injured. I think it is discriminatory. Regardless it is a good idea for any power wheelchair user to have a back-up well-fit manual chair that can be pushed by a caregiver; especially for use when being transferred into a car or to a hospital where there is no way to send a power chair along.

    I hope he is getting help in getting out of institutional living all together, and can get into community living. His local CIL/ILC may have a program to help with that.

    (KLD)
    My understanding of his situation is he has no family that is close enough to help take care of him. All but $30 of his SSDI goes to the facility he is at. If he had his own place, he couldn't afford a care giver to stay overnight. He has no means of transportation and can't work. He's just there... I'll look into the local CIL and see what they suggest.

    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Be sure you clarify with the nursing home administration that any seatbelts or chest straps are being used as "supportive devices" as they can be interpreted as restraints, which are not allowed in most nursing homes now days. We frequently had this problem with side rails on the beds as well when getting equipment for our SCI Veterans who lived in SNFs.

    Depending on his person C4 injury, arm troughs may be needed as a feature of the armrests. Are his neck muscles strong? Does he use a headrest in his current power chair? If so, he may need a headrest on a manual chair as well.

    Did this young man not have an inpatient acute rehab stay? Is he eligible for a outpatient seating/chair evaluation under his insurance?


    (KLD)
    I hadn't thought about neck muscles and I can't remember if he uses a headrest. I'm also not sure about his inpatient rehab, that was 10 years ago. It seems from what has been posted so far that using a manual chair for a c4/5 is not going to work (if he does the pushing). He moves his arms like his injury is lower though. He says he has decent upper body strength (chest/shoulders/biceps) but no triceps or hand function. So I'm not really sure what he is capable of.

    Quote Originally Posted by tooley View Post
    Brad - it's awesome you have taken an interest in this person! You can/have probably made a big impact in their well-being by being a new friend that believes in them. But you might not want to give them too much false hope as to their future abilities. And I know that is probably why he is living where/how he is living now - because health care professionals are trained to coddle people and not raise their hopes up. But for someone with a complete C4/C5 injury it may be too much to hope they will be able to push a manual chair.
    Worst case scenario it could lead to a major let-down for this person. All that being said, I don't know this person. Hopefully you're the spark they need to want more from their life. On the other hand you don't want to be one more person that wants the best for them but doesn't allow them to achieve it for themselves. (think of a mother who smothers)
    I hope I'm getting my point across without being a dick. For a lot of quads I know they feel most independent when they are "forced to" accomplish things on their own. A bit like the old adage "give a man a fish [....] teach a man to fish..."
    In your other thread I wanted to comment about trying to find a local quad rugby team - he could meet other quads to network with, even if he's not interested/able to play.
    Thanks for the comments, and I understand what you're saying. I don't want him to get his hopes up either. I'm not sure if we have a local rugby team, I'll have to look into that.

  2. #12
    It would be nice to have a manual chair for times when he is being transported by someone who can't accommodate an electric chair. My main concern would be his stability in the chair. He would need the proper armrests and backrest, maybe even belts. When someone doesn't have any truck muscles or the ability to hold on, then any quick movement or stop can result in them coming out of the chair.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southeast, USA
    Posts
    631
    Just an update, I spoke with the therapist at our local seating clinic who visits this facility twice a month and knows the residents. I asked her if this could at least be an option for transportation, to allow him to be able to leave without someone needing a wheelchair accessible van to pick him up. She did not think a manual chair would provide enough trunk/lateral stability for his injury level and he would have to rely on someone else for pressure reliefs (which I didn't think about). So I guess this isn't going to work out. I wasn't expecting to be told a manual chair can't be setup for someone at that injury level to use safely though. Are there just not lateral supports, high enough backrests, headrests, etc. available for manual chairs? I can imagine it would be difficult to attach things like that to a tilite.

  4. #14
    A reclining back manual wheelchair with chest strap could be used, as long as he has someone with him who could do transfers, dependent weight shifts, and has enough room in their car to break the chair down and get it in/out of the car. There are chairs like this with quick release wheels, and you might be able to find him one on eBay, Craig's List, or other places to get used equipment. It will not be as light weight as a Tilite, but since he wouldn't be able to push it himself anyway, that would not be such an important criteria.

    Here is an example: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Drive-Medic...kAAOSwGWNUV1DF

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southeast, USA
    Posts
    631
    Thanks for the link. Has anyone else used a reclining back manual chair with a chest strap for a C4/5 SCI (even if it's just for transportation)? If so, what kind of backrest did you use that was tall enough to provide enough support? Pics would be great too.

  6. #16
    Brad09, I totally appreciate what you are doing to mentor this person in the nursing home. I agree with Tooley's suggestion to see if there's a quad rugby team near enough to have him and possibly other facility residents attend a game or practice. The reasoning, to clarify, is not to play the game but to attend a sports event, such as a baseball or football game. The possibility of networking with other quads who are active and independent can be invaluable for someone - especially someone in a nursing home where they live with day to day rules based on protecting them.

    I also support the idea of involving a local Center for Independent Living as they may be able to review his current goals, if any, and provide information he may be seeking.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southeast, USA
    Posts
    631
    Thank you for the suggestion. The problem is there is no easy way to get him to a rugby game even if he wanted to go. He would have to find someone with a wheelchair accessible van. That's why I'm trying to figure out if there is any way to modify my old ZRA for him to use for transportation, so anyone with a car could take him somewhere.

    After being told by the specialist at our local seating clinic that it would not be safe for him to use a manual chair for this purpose I started doing some more research. There are plenty of pictures of people on social media with c4/5 SCI's that are sitting in manual chairs (with people pushing them). So I'm struggling to understand the suggestion of the therapist. Is this not as easy as raising the backrest on my old chair all the way up, putting the armrests back on and finding a chest strap? Can anyone with a c4 or 5 SCI comment on using a manual chair for transportation?

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southeast, USA
    Posts
    631
    Can anyone answer this? ^^

  9. #19
    I would be more concerned with how he will transfer in and out of transportation rather than can he sit in a manual chair.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southeast, USA
    Posts
    631
    Quote Originally Posted by smity50 View Post
    I would be more concerned with how he will transfer in and out of transportation rather than can he sit in a manual chair.
    This is a good question. How do others that use manual chairs for this purpose do it if they don't have the ability to transfer themselves? Do others just pick them up and put them in the seat of a vehicle? If that's the case, it would probably be easier to do that than find a way to transport a power chair without a van.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-05-2018, 05:02 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-24-2013, 12:50 AM
  3. Manual chair for quad wanted
    By Stacka in forum Equipment & Services
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-10-2013, 12:35 PM
  4. C5-6 quad looking for new manual chair
    By GReaper in forum Equipment
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-11-2011, 10:43 AM
  5. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-28-2011, 08:37 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •