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Thread: How to handle operation

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by oldschool View Post
    xsfxsf,
    My urologist found a small mass on my right kidney back in 2017. He was able to remove the mass and spare my kidney. The recovery was relatively easy, but I already had a colostomy. I was back to normal activities in 6 weeks and cancer free 2 years and counting!
    That is what my urologist told me 7 years ago.

    i wonder what the exact recovery would be for kidney removal?
    Last edited by xsfxsf; 08-10-2019 at 05:40 AM.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by xsfxsf View Post
    That is what my urologist told me 7 years ago. Now they say the kidney cannot be spared.
    Surgery can be daunting but if you want to live as good a life as you can, you can. If you want a better, longer one, I would suggest, get the surgery.
    I have no personal experience with colostomy; what I can tell you is a good friend had a bag attached while she was recovering from bowel cancer surgery. After a time the bag was removed and she was back to the usual.
    After surgery and recovery, you may wish to carry on with the attachment. We all shit - in the toilet, on the bed, in the bed, in our pants, in a bag. It's fortunate for us who live with modern medical assistance, we have choices as well.
    We become accustomed and accepting to new ways of coping too so why not a bag.
    If it was me, I would opt for the surgery with the bag. Or rather, the other way round. Then again it is easy for me as it is an objective proposition from here - at this time..
    Last edited by slow_runner; 08-10-2019 at 06:52 AM.

  3. #13
    Just wondering if a biopsy was done to determine surgery is needed. Also, how big is the "mass". I guess I'm saying has doctor told you enough information so you can be more comfortable about the need for surgery?
    Careful planning for after-surgery care would help - even if a short stay in rehab is needed. I would make sure the doctor/surgeon knows what you need for disability-related after care in case you need their support/orders for care. In my experience their 'routine care' does not include the unique needs of paralysis.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by annev308 View Post
    Can your doctor not stipulate that you get a private room and a quiet environment? I?ve had 6 surgeries and 8 non-surgical hospitalizations since my original injury and I have never been put in a shared room. My insurance is just Medicare so nothing fancy.
    I too have Medicare and they will not pay for a private room unless there is a strict medical need, such as the need for isolation or you are a threat to other patients and persons. The need for a quiet environment, though universal, I do not believe would qualify as a legitimate need.

    You can make your best case and hope for the best, but in the United States private rooms are not the norm unless one is willing to pay for it or you happen to be in the right place at the right time in terms of occupancy rates and one is simply available.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saint Petersburg , Florida
    Posts
    1,093
    After doing bowel care between 2-4 hours a day 3 times a week for 24 years I got a colostomy. The past 5 years have been the best 5 years of my life after my injury. I wish I had it done when I was first injured.

  6. #16
    So they biopsied it or it looks very specific as "cancer"? That being said- get the mass out- my mother died from renal cell cancer because she was diagnosed too late and it had spread to her lungs.
    She was a nurse- every ache she complained of was "menopause, or stress, or nerves". We pick up alot of early renal cancer and it is totally curable with surgical removal. If it is small - is this an area that does the robotic surgery- then very small incision but either way have it out, other than possibly a big incision and 2-3 weks of soreness you should be fine. WE giured she had it for almost 20 years- usually slow growing- which is good.
    Because we do yearly renal ultrasounds we pick up alot of kiidney tumors/cancer and they area taken out or treated in some way. This is one of the best cancers to have- not that it can't return- it might but not like others.
    You can function with a small part of kidney removed or even the whole thing if the other kidney is working well and you defintiely want to make sure that kidney stays healthy.
    Yes, it is surgery but get your troops ( family, friends, short term extra paid caregivers , church, neighbors etc..) to have it done and have help while you recover. You will be great after that and won't have to worry about- just test every 6 months to one year then yearly.
    You can google kidney tumors/cancer and easily get more information. Ask surgeon specifics about surgery and recovery.

    CWO
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by triumph View Post
    Just wondering if a biopsy was done to determine surgery is needed. Also, how big is the "mass". I guess I'm saying has doctor told you enough information so you can be more comfortable about the need for surgery?
    Careful planning for after-surgery care would help - even if a short stay in rehab is needed. I would make sure the doctor/surgeon knows what you need for disability-related after care in case you need their support/orders for care. In my experience their 'routine care' does not include the unique needs of paralysis.
    8cm and yes. I'm trying look into after care planning which is why I am posting this.

    After a kidney removal can I even do a transfer? The way my house is set up the transfer from the chair to toilet takes a lot of strength and strain.
    Last edited by xsfxsf; 08-11-2019 at 08:04 AM.

  8. #18
    I would not be focusing on transfers, but on contacting family/friends ASAP for a care team for after surgery. It seems you will want personal care at home or go to a rehab center. I can't imagine doing transfers right after surgery like that - train your helpers to do that.
    Let us know what you come up with.

  9. #19
    It depends- are they removing the entire kidney or just the cancerous part- or depends on what they find when they go in. unless robotic or minimally invasive will have long incision even if small incision(s) needs to be careful especially the first 2 weeks but after 6 weeks you defintiely should be able to transfer and back to normal. You need to get more specific information from your surgeon. Unless someone has had similiar in the last several years you cannot compare what they did or couldn't do after surgery. There are different options now compared to even 10 years ago depending on the results of scans , location, and surgeon.
    Sometimes surgeons will tell you the restrictions but a "translation" reL to normal SCI activity i.e. transfers, doing own bowel program, etc.. has to be considered. You want a quiet environment in a hospital- wear ear plugs. Even if in isolation, you can be put in a room with someone with same organisms- like MRSA +. we fill up the room. I don't think most post op hospitals do that but... and don't be afraid to ask questions and ask for specifics. After you get specific restrictions we can probably be more specific.

    CWO
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #20
    My urologist has me doing semiannual renal/bladder ultrasounds? Is that unnecessary? It does possibly identify something six months early though.

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