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Thread: Anyone go to Chiropractor .... what are your thoughts?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    How do you vet their background? Not trying to be pejorative...but what does "knowing their background" mean? How do we evaluate background vis a vie our own issues and needs?
    That's just it, to me. I've been to physicians and therapists with great backgrounds (on paper), years of experience, and professional recommendations - and they still managed to screw up royally. With something as important as the spine and cord, I won't take chances anymore in the anguished hope that something might help with existing issues that are easier to cope with than bad therapeutic results.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    That's just it, to me. I've been to physicians and therapists with great backgrounds (on paper), years of experience, and professional recommendations - and they still managed to screw up royally. With something as important as the spine and cord, I won't take chances anymore in the anguished hope that something might help with existing issues that are easier to cope with than bad therapeutic results.
    It is one of the most difficult issues that any patient deals with...no matter what the medical issues. One person's great doc is another person's worst nightmare...

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    It is one of the most difficult issues that any patient deals with...no matter what the medical issues. One person's great doc is another person's worst nightmare...
    So true, GJ! Absolutely.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    How do you vet their background? Not trying to be pejorative...but what does "knowing their background" mean? How do we evaluate background vis a vie our own issues and needs?
    Fairly easy now a days, I would assume, with the advent of the internet. It's not that difficult to find what schools and Universities they went too. If from the Falklands school of Chiropractory vs. the Palmer School of Chiropractors would be a good hint of their background and training.

    Do you ever read the certificates of training your doc went thru? They're usually posted on his wall or can ask.

  5. #15
    I used a chiro for several months about 25 years ago for a neck injury after tipping backwards in my chair. Did wonders for me, however I refused to have any manipulation below my neck. Moving forward and into 2000, I developed severe, debilitating bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and basically lost hand use for over a year (I'm T11). Saw a chiro to avoid surgery and within less than 5 months, he had cleared it up doing hand & wrist traction & manipulation along with some neck adjusting. Mine was brought on mostly from doing data entry for 20 years. Even though I had a very knowledgeable chiro each instance I still would avoid it if at all possible and never ever let them get anywhere near my fusion. As Bonnette mentioned, it doesn't take much to screw you up for life.

  6. #16
    I have read in the paper that the neck cracking by the chiropractors lead to stroke in elderly. This article was for able bodies. People with SCI should be very careful. I went to a chiropractor at the beginning to help with pain but he did not want to touch me. I had a neck brace then but then pain went away later.

  7. #17
    The only type of chiropractor I would see is one who uses an activator tool. This is not too invasive. I would totally avoid chiropractic care that involves drop tables or physical manipulation with their hands.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ouch View Post
    The only type of chiropractor I would see is one who uses an activator tool. This is not too invasive. I would totally avoid chiropractic care that involves drop tables or physical manipulation with their hands.
    Referring back to my days in chiropractic college, most chiros scoff at the use of an activator tool. It's not "real" chiropractic. Similarly, if there's no "audible" when delivering an adjustment, was the patient truly adjusted? And what is the goal of adjustments: to align the spine or restore mobility? These are just a sampling of the super-scientific questions that get asked and opinions that get bandied about inside the sausage-making facility. And I shouldn't say science when chiropractic refers to itself as a philosophy (except for those that don't!). Caveat emptor never had greater meaning.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    Referring back to my days in chiropractic college, most chiros scoff at the use of an activator tool. It's not "real" chiropractic. Similarly, if there's no "audible" when delivering an adjustment, was the patient truly adjusted? And what is the goal of adjustments: to align the spine or restore mobility? These are just a sampling of the super-scientific questions that get asked and opinions that get bandied about inside the sausage-making facility. And I shouldn't say science when chiropractic refers to itself as a philosophy (except for those that don't!). Caveat emptor never had greater meaning.
    My own experience with the chiropractors I stayed with was very different. They insisted on xrays, they were pretty humble about their limitations, and they used activators. I did encounter some idiots while traveling, one of whom hurt me. I've walked out of several offices without paying or getting care when it became clear the person was incompetent either ethically or professionally. Except for my current practitioner they have also been generous with their time and offered sliding scales.

    I am now a high risk patient and am vigilant about getting the gentlest of care. A transverse process could break, a vertebra could crack. It is my choice to get care because it improves my comfort a lot. Could I live to regret it? Sure, but this is true of many allopathic medical procedures as well. The care we get depends on the competence of the doctor we see on the particular day we see them.

  10. #20
    Agree with crags above I would not allow manipulation over areas where spinal surgery or damage has occurred without consulting a physiatrist

    pbr
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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