Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Not a cure but dam would this improve quads lives

  1. #1

    Not a cure but dam would this improve quads lives

    13 quads had hand movement restored with nerve transfers. Sounds like triceps also.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...aralysed-hands

  2. #2
    Senior Member Tim C.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,154
    Blog Entries
    1
    hmmmm, what's afoot here?
    a hand?

  3. #3
    There is so much missing from the report in this study that is very necessary information...
    1. How many years post injury?
    2. Were the participants in the study complete or incomplete?
    3. I'm a complete injury at C6/7 and can extend my forearm from my elbow...how would I get more hand function? I pushed a manual wheelchair for years until my shoulders gave out and Atrial Fibrillation curtailed my cardio function.
    4. In the case study, Paul isn't too specific about his improvement. I've been able to use tenodesis grasp to pick up a full 12 ounce can of a drink almost from the beginning 38 years ago. Paul seemed to report that he wasn't be able to do that just a couple of years post injury.
    5. Being able to break down his wheelchair and transfer himself and the chair into a car is admirable and an accomplishment, but what does that really mean, and what will happen to his shoulders long term?
    6. Many quads at C6/7 can and do live independently...
    7. I can extend my hand to shake hands, but I don't have a grasp. Does Paul in the case study have grasp?
    8. Can the individual (Paul in this case study) manipulate and take apart small parts. Can he type on a keyboard or smart phone key pad without some type of aid/stylus?
    9. The injury that all quads suffer is enervation in the spinal cord, not in the shoulder, where it seems this nerve transfer happens. See the diagram in the article sited above. If the enervation doesn't happen from the spinal cord, how is the nerve transplant going to get it's "electrical" signals?
    10. What kind of pain occurred after the transplant?

    So...what is really accomplished...why and how?

    I'm quite skeptical on every aspect of this surgery and the reports of success.
    Last edited by gjnl; 07-06-2019 at 11:39 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    465
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    There is so much missing from the report in this study that is very necessary information...
    1. How many years post injury?
    2. Were the participants in the study complete or incomplete?
    3. I'm a complete injury at C6/7 and can extend my forearm from my elbow...how would I get more hand function? I pushed a manual wheelchair for years until my shoulders gave out and Atrial Fibrillation curtailed my cardio function.
    4. In the case study, Paul isn't too specific about his improvement. I've been able to use tenodesis grasp to pick up a full 12 ounce can of a drink almost from the beginning 38 years ago. Paul seemed to report that he wasn't be able to do that just a couple of years post injury.
    5. Being able to break down his wheelchair and transfer himself and the chair into a car is admirable and an accomplishment, but what does that really mean, and what will happen to his shoulders long term?
    6. Many quads at C6/7 can and do live independently...
    7. I can extend my hand to shake hands, but I don't have a grasp. Does Paul in the case study have grasp?
    8. Can the individual (Paul in this case study) manipulate and take apart small parts. Can he type on a keyboard or smart phone key pad without some type of aid/stylus?
    9. The injury that all quads suffer is enervation in the spinal cord, not in the shoulder, where it seems this nerve transfer happens. See the diagram in the article sited above. If the enervation doesn't happen from the spinal cord, how is the nerve transplant going to get it's "electrical" signals?
    10. What kind of pain occurred after the transplant?

    So...what is really accomplished...why and how?

    I'm quite skeptical on every aspect of this surgery and the reports of success.
    Well said.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tim C.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,154
    Blog Entries
    1
    this some 'for-profit' type trial?
    hate it when you read something that sounds too good to be true
    is this being done next to the blue shark cell transplanting clinic in Tijuana?

  6. #6

  7. #7
    A simple before and after video is all we need to see.
    Last edited by smity50; 07-07-2019 at 02:28 PM.

  8. #8
    There are snippets of videos on The Lancet's YouTube channel - one is a 19-second clip of a hand opening and closing, without discussion or "before" footage; the second clip is an interview with one of the 13 patients, comparing the results of surgeries he underwent as a member of the trial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICg-w0ZdV_c No "before" footage, though.

    This is hardly the kind of in-depth reporting we'd like to see, but The Lancet finds the work legitimate. The full Lancet article is behind a paywall, but there's a summary here: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...143-2/fulltext
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    There are snippets of videos on The Lancet's YouTube channel - one is a 19-second clip of a hand opening and closing, without discussion or "before" footage; the second clip is an interview with one of the 13 patients, comparing the results of surgeries he underwent as a member of the trial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICg-w0ZdV_c No "before" footage, though.

    This is hardly the kind of in-depth reporting we'd like to see, but The Lancet finds the work legitimate. The full Lancet article is behind a paywall, but there's a summary here: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...143-2/fulltext
    A 15 minute podcast interview with the lead author: https://www.thelancet.com/pb-assets/...e_transfer.mp3

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    A 15 minute podcast interview with the lead author: https://www.thelancet.com/pb-assets/...e_transfer.mp3
    Thanks, GRAMMY!
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

Similar Threads

  1. Stem Cells Can Improve Lives
    By Faye in forum Cure
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-23-2005, 01:02 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-21-2005, 07:24 AM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-23-2004, 05:47 PM
  4. Their lives go on
    By Max in forum Recreation, Sports, Travel, & Hobbies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-30-2004, 08:48 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-05-2002, 07:03 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •